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Tajikistan PDF version    Email this article Print this article Subscribe FAO GIEWS RSS  Share this article  

Reference Date: 25-February-2013

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  1. Early forecast for winter cereal production is positive

  2. The aggregate cereal production in 2012 is close to last year’s level

  3. The country depends heavily on cereal imports that remain at a high level in 2012/13 marketing year

  4. High food prices are affecting the food security of vulnerable populations

Early forecast for winter cereal production is positive

Despite the level of soil moisture differs by the regions of the country, vegetation conditions for winter crops appear unharmed, possibly due to the continued presence of irrigation water in some areas. The total winter wheat planting area has increased slightly. Assuming normal weather conditions, the early forecast for winter cereal production is positive. Winter crops represent about two thirds of all cereals planted in the country and the winter wheat planting area accounts for approximately 92 percent of the total.

The aggregate cereal production in 2012 is close to last year’s level

The aggregate 2012 cereal production is estimated at some 1 million tonnes, which is close to both last year’s level and the five-year average level. Wheat represents around three fourth of the total aggregated cereal production. Average yields in Tajikistan demonstrate a steady increase for four consecutive years: they are 2.5 tonnes per hectare, although they are much higher in the irrigated fields. The other cereal crops are barley, maize, and rice that represent around 26 percent of the total cereal production on average.

The country depends heavily on cereal imports that remain at a high level in 2012/13 marketing year

The country heavily depends on cereal imports, mainly food wheat despite stable cereal output being experienced for four consecutive years. Imports have been steadily increasing since 2006/07 marketing year (July-June) due to insufficient level of local production, increasing number of population and level of consumption. Wheat imports represent about 80 percent of domestic food consumption in the 2011/12 marketing year, which reflects increased demand both for feed and food. It is estimated that imports account for over 58 percent of Tajikistan’s domestic cereal requirements and 81 percent of food consumption for 2012/13 marketing year. Import of wheat and barley mainly comes from Kazakhstan, rice - from the Russian Federation.

High food prices are affecting the food security of vulnerable populations

In Tajikistan, which heavily depends on import, prices of wheat flour remained stable or showed some declines in December 2012, though still by 33 percent higher than a year earlier. Prices reflect strong export quotations from Kazakhstan, the country’s main supplier. Transportation and fuel prices have also contributed to surging of food prices. In Khalton and Sughd, December prices of wheat flour were even 29 percent and 44 percent above last year’s level, respectively. During 2012 an increase in food prices was also recorded on other staple food products such as potatoes (by 19 percent), beef (by 15 percent), bread and other staple products. For mitigating risks of food price increase the Government has started to release wheat flour from state reserves in parallel to significant increased import of wheat to ensure domestic availability. However, increasing food prices are affecting the food security of vulnerable groups of population.









Relevant links:
From GIEWS:
 Food Price Data and Analysis Tool
 Main Food-related Policy Measures (From 1 Jan 2008 to 11 Oct 2011)
 Crop and Food Security Assessment Mission (CFSAM) Reports & Special Alerts: 2009, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1996
From FAO:
 FAO Country Profiles

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