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Turkmenistan PDF version    Email this article Print this article Subscribe FAO GIEWS RSS  Share this article  

Reference Date: 13-December-2012

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  1. Weather conditions in 2012 were favourable for winter crops planting

  2. The 2012 cereal production slightly decreased

  3. Cereal import requirements forecast to increase though insignificantly

  4. Food insecurity remains a concern for low-income population

Weather conditions in 2012 were favourable for winter crops planting

Weather conditions in 2012 were favourable for winter crops planting. The adequate level of precipitation provided needed soil moisture at the beginning of the cropping season. The winter crops are about 60 percent of the total crops. The planting area remains at the level of last year and no increase is foreseen.

The 2012 cereal production slightly decreased

The aggregated cereal output in 2012 is slightly below last year’s level due to cold winter and hot weather during the spring-summer months. The main cereal crop is wheat representing around 87 percent of the total cereal production. The state provides subsidies to farmers for agricultural inputs including fertilizers, fuel, machinery services etc. However, the growing of cereals mainly rely on irrigation which is not sufficient to cover the needs during the summer months. The country also faces the land degradation, therefore in spite of irrigation, yields are very low or around 1.5 tonnes per hectare.

Cereal import requirements forecast to increase insignificantly

Following increased harvests in 2009 and 2010, imports of cereals have significantly dropped in the past two marketing years (July/June). The country still needs to import cereals, mainly wheat, considering the poor quality of the locally produced one. For three consequent marketing years, 2008/09 to 2010/11, the import of wheat for food consumption has significantly decreased from 58 to 9 percent of the total food consumption. In 2011/12 marketing year (July-June) cereal import, mainly wheat, consisted around 9 percent of domestic needs. The bulk of cereals imports are in the form of wheat for covering production deficits and also the low quality of the locally produced wheat. The country imports wheat from Kazakhstan and rice from the Russian Federation; both of them have reduced cereal harvest in 2012 and increased export prices. Thus, the import bills of the country will increase accordingly.

Food insecurity remains a concern for low-income population

Prices of wheat flour and bread have increased in the last months in Turkmenistan, due to the elimination of social subsidies which were provided by the Government for keeping prices at a lower level especially on basic foods. High unemployment, in particular in rural areas, and surged prices on staple food push an increase of food insecurity among low-income groups of the population.







Relevant links:
From GIEWS:
 Earth Observation Indicators
 Maps
 Seasonal Indicators
 Vegetation Indicators
 Precipitation Indicators
 Graphs & Data
 NDVI & Precipitation
From FAO:
 FAO Country Profiles

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