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Reference Date: 14-August-2014

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  1. Cereal production in 2014 forecast at a record level

  2. Import requirements are forecast at an average level in the 2014/15 marketing year (July/June)

  3. Food security concerns for vulnerable groups of population

Cereal production in 2014 forecast at a record level

Harvesting of the 2014 winter crops, mainly wheat, is nearing completion, while that of spring crops just started and is expected to continue until the end of September. The wheat crop, accounts for about 90 percent of the total cereal production. FAO’s latest forecast of 2014 wheat production stands at 7.3 million tonnes, 6 percent up from last year’s above-average harvest. The increase is mainly attributed to anticipated record yields, following favourable weather conditions during the growing season and use of improved seeds. Similarly, prospects for the maize and barley crops are good due to favourable weather conditions during the growing season and adequate supplies of water for irrigation. Total cereal production in 2014 is forecast at 8 million tonnes, 6 percent above last year’s high level.

Import requirements are forecast at an average level in the 2014/15 marketing year (July/June)

Despite relatively stable cereal production in recent years (2009-2013) and anticipated record production in 2014, the country still needs to import almost 50 percent of wheat for food consumption in the 2014/15 marketing year (July/June). Wheat import requirements in 2014/15 are forecast to decrease slightly but remain at a high level of 2 million tonnes, due to sustained strong domestic demand. Kazakhstan is the main supplier of high quality wheat and wheat flour.

Food security concerns for vulnerable groups of population

A significant proportion of cultivated land is irrigated, although 50 percent of irrigated land suffers of salinity and degraded fertility that impacts farmers and rural populations. The low-income rural households are most vulnerable to food insecurity, given that they spend on average about 61 percent of their income on food and consume mainly cereals.







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