GLOBEFISH-专注世界渔业贸易分析与信息

International Seminar on Sustainable Seafood Value Chain: Traceability

28/11/2018 - 30/12/2018

The FAO International Seminar on Sustainable Seafood Value Chain: Traceability was held in Shanghai, China on 28-30 November 2018 in collaboration with Shanghai Ocean University (SHOU). The seminar was attended by 35 participants, including speakers from competent authorities of six countries: Chile, China, Oman, Senegal, Sri Lanka and Thailand. Other Speakers were from SHOU, Ningbo University, FAO, SEAFDEC, WWF, and Eachmile Technologies. Representatives from China Aquatic Products Processing and Marketing Alliance (CAPPMA), China Blue Sustainability Institute, and private sector companies were also present. The purpose of the seminar was to address a variety of topics pertinent to the sustainable seafood value chain, including: current systems and principles of a good traceability system; blockchain and seafood traceability; current situation and constraints in seafood traceability. The seminar was also an invaluable opportunity for international experts to discuss challenges and exchange expertise on seafood traceability on both policy and practical levels. 

The seminar was organized around plenary presentations, discussions and a final round of recommendations for future collaboration. A list of supporting documents of FAO Technical Papers and Guidelines on Value Chain, Catch Documentation Schemes and Traceability was distributed to the participants. During the two-day International Seminar, participants reiterated that the sustainability of marine resources is a key aspect of food security and recognized the importance of supply chain traceability for market access and its vital role in addressing issues related to illegal fishing, mislabeling and social responsibility. Participants also highlighted the importance of transparency in all stages of the supply chain. Participants supported the continuous work and engagement by FAO on issues for combatting IUU fishing, particularly the implementation by countries of the FAO Agreement on Port State Measures (PSMA). Participants also highlighted that the FAO PSMA, the Voluntary Guidelines on Catch Documentation Schemes and other relevant instruments are powerful tools to help to eliminate IUU fishing. During the final discussion, participants reiterated the importance of FAO’s work especially in terms of harmonization initiatives as well as capacity building activities.

The seminar conclusions were presented and adopted during the final session and recommendations for future work were discussed. Mr John Ryder, Head of Products, Trade and Marketing Branch (FIAM) and Mr Nianjun Shen, Fishery Officer, Products, Trade and Marketing Branch (FIAM), along with representatives from Chile, Oman, Sri Lanka and Thailand had an official meeting with Prof. Wu, the Party Secretary of the SHOU. Mr Ryder introduced the purpose, program and progress of the seminar to Prof. Wu, and both sides exchanged their appreciation of cooperation between FAO and SHOU, and expressed strong willingness to continue such collaboration in the future. Prof. Wu also introduced to national representatives international training and degree programs offered by SHOU.

Seminar Conclusions and Recommendations:

  1. A group of representatives working in different departments of national governments dealing with trade and traceability in fish and fishery products, was brought together by FAO for the International Seminar on Sustainable Seafood Salue Chain: Traceability held in Shanghai from 28-30 November 2018. The International Seminar served as a platform for the participants to address a variety of topics pertinent to the sustainable seafood value chains and the applications of traceability. The International Seminar was implemented and hosted by the Shanghai Ocean University.
  2. The opening ceremony began with welcome remarks from Prof. Jiannong Wu, Deputy Secretary of the Shanghai Ocean University who underlined the importance of the topic and praised the cooperation between the University and FAO over the recent years. Present at the opening ceremony was also Mr Jianmin Zhou, Director of Aquatic Product Office who recalled the importance of fisheries and aquaculture in Shanghai Municipality and informed of the Office’s roles in strengthening capacity to combat Illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing and delivering on responsible fishing practices and implementing traceability. In his opening remarks on behalf of FAO, Mr John Ryder, Head of Products, Trade and Marketing Branch (FIAM) noted the roles of FAO and highlighted the recent challenges faced by the fisheries and aquaculture sector and underscored the timeliness of the International Seminar. Mr Ryder concluded by reiterating thanks and appreciation to Shanghai Ocean University for hosting the event.
  3. On the first day of the International Seminar, FAO representatives gave an overview of the status and trends of fish trade and markets and presented on FAO work on value chains, traceability in relation to food safety, certification and ecolabeling schemes, as well as the Voluntary Guidelines for Catch Documentation Schemes (CDS) and the EU requirements for food safety and traceability. The audience was introduced to the organization’s normative, technical assistance and capacity building work.
  4. National experiences on the current status and constraints in seafood traceability were presented by representatives from Chile, China, Oman, Senegal, Sri Lanka, Thailand. We have noted government efforts to put in place traceability, with examples of electronic systems already implemented or being piloted as well as an example of government-industry co-led initiatives to implement and maintain such systems.
  5. Participants were introduced to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) CDS as an example of a joint regional Catch Documentation Scheme with practical applications in the industrial and small scale fisheries in  the ASEAN region.
  6. Two main seafood platforms were presented: Seafood Alliance for Legality and Traceability (SALT) and the Global Dialogue on Seafood Traceability (GDST). Participants were briefed on their objectives, scopes and actions to promote sustainability, legality and traceability of seafood. The audience was also introduced to blockchain technology and its potential applications for seafood traceability by Eachmile Technologies.
  7. During the two-day International Seminar, participants reiterated that the sustainability of marine resources is a key aspect of food security and recognized the importance of supply chain traceability for market access and its vital role in addressing issues related to illegal fishing, mislabeling and social responsibility. Participants also highlighted the importance of transparency in all stages of the supply chain.
  8. In addition, many presentations by country delegates indicated a positive trend towards implementation and harmonization of traceability systems. However, it should be noted that the set-up and maintenance of such systems might prove costly especially for developing countries with significant small-scale or artisanal fisheries.
  9. Participants supported the continuous work and engagement by FAO on issues for combatting IUU fishing, particularly the implementation by countries of the FAO Agreement on Port State Measures (PSMA). Participants also highlighted that the FAO PSMA, the Voluntary Guidelines on Catch Documentation Schemes and other relevant instruments are powerful tools to help to eliminate IUU fishing.
  10. At various occasions, presentations and discussions highlighted the key foundations of traceability: inclusivity, impermeability and verifiability. Strong regulatory frameworks to deliver these functions are important.
  11. It was also noted that traceability systems implementation was catalyzed by market access requirements, especially the EC regulations for food safety and the EU IUU regulation, the USSeafood Import Monitoring Program (SIMP) as well as those required by private sector actors.
  12. When traceability systems exist, presentations highlighted that there is often little interaction between the health Competent Authority and the fisheries Competent Authority in terms of their set-up and assessment. In such cases, harmonization of actions and policies of the different official bodies having responsibilities regarding seafood traceability systems is important.
  13. Country presentations highlighted that for traceability systems to work efficiently, collaboration and involvement of supply chain stakeholders is crucial to ensure compliance.
  14. International initiatives such as the Seafood Alliance for Legality and Traceability (SALT) and the Global Dialogue on Seafood Traceability (GDST), are promoting and voicing out the industry’s interest to adopt electronic traceability and advance the importance of interoperability and adoption of a global seafood traceability framework.
  15. Of note is also the expansion of roles and functions of traceability to cover social sustainability which has become a major concern in fisheries due to labour rights violations and human rights abuses.
  16. During the final discussion, participants reiterated the importance of FAO’s work especially in terms of harmonization initiatives as well as capacity building activities. In this regard, participants proposed the following recommendations:
  • Recommendation 1: Development of guidance to member states on national seafood traceability regulatory framework. The guidance document should include a list of minimum requirements for traceability along the seafood value chain. Data verification to address issues related to transparency, data recording and verification as well as support to interoperability, should also be included.
  • Such a document will support the development, enforcement and effective verification of traceability in the seafood supply chain. It will also help countries with existing traceability systems evaluate the efficacy of their systems and identify gaps. While initiatives such as SALT and the GDST are developing industry-initiated lists of Key Data Elements (KDEs) and framework for their verification, it was recommended that FAO works towards setting up a list of minimum requirements for seafood traceability with clearly defined authoritative sources of KDEs and supporting verification mechanisms. The minimum requirements could build on the Universally Unique Identifier (UUID) developed by FAO and its partners within the framework of the Blue BRIDGE Project;
  • Recommendation 2: Identify, document and disseminate benefits and incentives for the adoption of traceability systems in the seafood supply chain. This could be in the form of a study highlighting the importance of traceability for market access, insurance premium, claim of ownership and promotion of products and country’s image. The proposed study will also build on successful business cases from both developed and developing countries;
  • Recommendation 3: FAO should play a more proactive role in coordinating global seafood traceability work, and contributing to multiple stakeholder initiatives constructively. The recommendation includes the possible joining of FAO into the GDST advisory group.
  • Recommendation 4: FAO should continue to provide technical capacity building support to member states in establishing or strengthening national traceability system, being for combating IUU fishing or food safety purposes.

17. Finally, participants were informed that the conclusions and recommendations of the International Seminar will be brought to the next meeting of the FAO Committee on Fisheries- Sub-Committee on Fish Trade to be held in Vigo, Spain, in November 2019.

Documents - Plenary Presentations

FAO Technical Papers and Guidelines on Value Chain, Catch Documentation Schemes and Traceability

分享本页内容