KORE - Knowledge Sharing Platform on Resilience

Good practices and resilience

Knowledge sharing and capitalization of good practices have a key role to play in building the resilience of agriculture-based livelihoods. Considerable experience is being gained across sectors and ad-hoc solutions addressing shocks and crises are being found in many different contexts. A fair amount of these experiences are already being documented. However, the resilience-related knowledge gained needs to be systematically analysed, documented and shared so that development organizations and actors understand what works well and why and thus replicate and upscale identified good and promising practices in order to inform policies adequately.

Latest Good Practices

28 May 2020
Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) is a transboundary animal disease (TAD) notorious for its ability to severely affect, and indeed disrupt, regional and international trade in animals and animal products. In FMD-endemic countries, which are usually developing countries, the disease threatens food security [...]
Enhancing monitoring for disaster resilience, preparedness and response in a context prone to hydro-meteorological hazards
16 April 2020
The Philippines ranks fourth among the world’s most disaster-prone countries. The archipelago’s over 7,000 islands lie in the path of the most active typhoon generator in the world, as well as in perilous proximity to the Pacific Ocean’s volcano-filled, earthquake-plagued [...]
06 April 2020
The main farming systems in Karamoja Cluster incorporate mixed farming; agro-pastoral farming; highland perennial farming; highland mixed farming and pastoral farming; fish-based farming; irrigated farming; sparse arid pastoralism and oases farming and urban and peri-urban farming systems. In terms of [...]
31 March 2020
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is the capacity of microorganisms to resist medicines used to treat infections. It is a major global threat of increasing concern to human and animal health. It also has implications for the food safety, food security and [...]
06 March 2020
Livestock is one of the major renewable resource endowments of the IGAD Member States (Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan and Uganda). The region has one of the highest ruminant livestock concentrations in Africa and in the world. Its [...]
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“Good”, “best” and “promising” practices

When identifying and documenting an experience, it is important to understand the different states of a practice, regarding the level of evidence and its replicability potential. And to recognize that not all experiences can be qualified as good practices.

A good practice can be defined as follows:

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A good practice is not only a practice that is good, but one that has been proven to work well and produce good results. It has been tested and validated through its various replications and is therefore recommended as a model and deserves to be shared, so that a greater number of people can adopt it.

"Best" vs "good" practices:

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The term “best practice” is often used; however, some will prefer to use “good practice” as “best practice” may imply that no further improvements are possible to the practice. It is indeed debatable whether there is a single ‘best’ approach knowing that approaches are constantly evolving and being updated.

For a practice to be considered as a “good practice”, it needs to be supported by a series of evidence obtained through data gathering and several replications. In some cases, a practice has the potential to become a “good practice” but cannot be yet qualified as one because of a lack of evidence and/or replications. In this case, it can be considered a “promising practice”.

 

A promising practice can be defined as follows:

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A promising practice has demonstrated a high degree of success in its single setting, and the possibility of replication in the same setting is guaranteed. It has generated some quantitative data showing positive outcomes over a period of time. A promising practice has the potential to become a good practice, but it doesn’t have enough research or has yet to be replicated to support wider adoption or upscaling. As such, a promising practice incorporates a process of continuous learning and improvement.