KORE - Knowledge Sharing Platform on Resilience

Good practices and resilience

Knowledge sharing and capitalization of good practices have a key role to play in building the resilience of agriculture-based livelihoods. Considerable experience is being gained across sectors and ad-hoc solutions addressing shocks and crises are being found in many different contexts. A fair amount of these experiences are already being documented. However, the resilience-related knowledge gained needs to be systematically analysed, documented and shared so that development organizations and actors understand what works well and why and thus replicate and upscale identified good and promising practices in order to inform policies adequately.

Latest Good Practices

Promoting COVID-19-safe migration and livestock markets while tailoring livestock packages and cash-for-work schemes
24 November 2020
Kuchi pastoralists, numbering around 2.4 million people in Afghanistan, are one of the region’s most vulnerable groups. Their condition has since been exacerbated by COVID-19 and containment measures related to the pandemic. As part of its emerging COVID-19 response, the [...]
Using digital media and distanced messaging to promote virus mitigation and combat misinformation
09 November 2020
The continuing COVID-19 pandemic—and related lockdowns—triggered a massive cash crisis around the world for families who depend on informal earnings, including daily wage workers. In Pakistan, a nationwide lockdown was imposed on 21 March 2020. This had major reverberations on [...]
Protecting livelihoods and boosting social cohesion between Venezuelan migrants, Colombian returnees and host communities in the department of La Guajira
08 September 2020
  Colombia’s northern neighbour Venezuela has slipped into a deep economic crisis that has sent 5 million people across borders in search of food and stability. It has been the fastest movement of people in Latin America’s recent history and it [...]
Improving diets while promoting the diversification of livelihoods and nutrition education in a protracted crisis
02 September 2020
Over 75 percent of the population in rural and peri-urban areas in South Sudan rely on agriculture for their livelihoods. With the outbreak of conflict starting at the end of 2013, the country has seen large-scale displacement, loss of livelihoods [...]
Safeguarding agricultural and pastoralist livelihoods by transforming a longstanding threat into a sustainable resource for women and youth
21 August 2020
Prosopis juliflora is a thorny, dominant and thirsty tree species that has invaded the main grazing areas in many countries in the Horn of Africa (HoA), posing a major threat to rural livelihoods. The scale of Prosopis expansion is dramatic [...]
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“Good”, “best” and “promising” practices

When identifying and documenting an experience, it is important to understand the different states of a practice, regarding the level of evidence and its replicability potential. And to recognize that not all experiences can be qualified as good practices.

A good practice can be defined as follows:

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A good practice is not only a practice that is good, but one that has been proven to work well and produce good results. It has been tested and validated through its various replications and is therefore recommended as a model and deserves to be shared, so that a greater number of people can adopt it.

"Best" vs "good" practices:

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The term “best practice” is often used; however, some will prefer to use “good practice” as “best practice” may imply that no further improvements are possible to the practice. It is indeed debatable whether there is a single ‘best’ approach knowing that approaches are constantly evolving and being updated.

For a practice to be considered as a “good practice”, it needs to be supported by a series of evidence obtained through data gathering and several replications. In some cases, a practice has the potential to become a “good practice” but cannot be yet qualified as one because of a lack of evidence and/or replications. In this case, it can be considered a “promising practice”.

 

A promising practice can be defined as follows:

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A promising practice has demonstrated a high degree of success in its single setting, and the possibility of replication in the same setting is guaranteed. It has generated some quantitative data showing positive outcomes over a period of time. A promising practice has the potential to become a good practice, but it doesn’t have enough research or has yet to be replicated to support wider adoption or upscaling. As such, a promising practice incorporates a process of continuous learning and improvement.