KORE - Knowledge Sharing Platform on Resilience

Good practices and resilience

Knowledge sharing and capitalization of good practices have a key role to play in building the resilience of agriculture-based livelihoods. Considerable experience is being gained across sectors and ad-hoc solutions addressing shocks and crises are being found in many different contexts. A fair amount of these experiences are already being documented. However, the resilience-related knowledge gained needs to be systematically analysed, documented and shared so that development organizations and actors understand what works well and why and thus replicate and upscale identified good and promising practices in order to inform policies adequately.

Latest Good Practices

Operationalising the humanitarian-development-peace nexus through the promotion of intercommunity coexistence
06 December 2019
One of the 25 selected winning development projects/SDG solutions at the Expo 2020 Dubai Global Best Practice Programme Frequent and persistent droughts are a recurrent feature of the Karamoja Cluster, which encompasses the southwestern parts of Ethiopia, northwestern Kenya, the southeastern [...]
26 November 2019
Cassava is the fifth most produced staple food crop in the world, being a basic source of staple food for an estimated 800 million people worldwide. Like other crops, cassava is vulnerable to pests and diseases that can cause heavy yield [...]
Good Practices of integrated resilience activities in the G5 Sahel
21 November 2019
The World Food Programme (WFP) is scaling-up investments to build community assets, promote education, improve nutrition and health, and create jobs for young people in the G5 Sahel countries – Burkina Faso, Chad, Mauritania, Mali and Niger. The aim is [...]
Improving crop yields to increase smallholder farmers’ incomes and boost their resilience to the impacts of climate shocks and stresses
25 September 2019
Eighty percent of the population of Kenya relies on agriculture for its livelihood. Agriculture is the backbone of the Kenyan economy, accounting directly for 26 percent of GDP and 60 percent of total export earnings. However, Kenyan farmers face major [...]
30 July 2019
Without significant and well-planned adaptation efforts, climate change is predicted to have a marked effect on the agricultural sector in Eastern Africa – reducing agricultural yields and negatively impacting efforts to achieve food security and end hunger in the subregion. [...]
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“Good”, “best” and “promising” practices

When identifying and documenting an experience, it is important to understand the different states of a practice, regarding the level of evidence and its replicability potential. And to recognize that not all experiences can be qualified as good practices.

A good practice can be defined as follows:

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A good practice is not only a practice that is good, but one that has been proven to work well and produce good results. It has been tested and validated through its various replications and is therefore recommended as a model and deserves to be shared, so that a greater number of people can adopt it.

"Best" vs "good" practices:

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The term “best practice” is often used; however, some will prefer to use “good practice” as “best practice” may imply that no further improvements are possible to the practice. It is indeed debatable whether there is a single ‘best’ approach knowing that approaches are constantly evolving and being updated.

For a practice to be considered as a “good practice”, it needs to be supported by a series of evidence obtained through data gathering and several replications. In some cases, a practice has the potential to become a “good practice” but cannot be yet qualified as one because of a lack of evidence and/or replications. In this case, it can be considered a “promising practice”.

 

A promising practice can be defined as follows:

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A promising practice has demonstrated a high degree of success in its single setting, and the possibility of replication in the same setting is guaranteed. It has generated some quantitative data showing positive outcomes over a period of time. A promising practice has the potential to become a good practice, but it doesn’t have enough research or has yet to be replicated to support wider adoption or upscaling. As such, a promising practice incorporates a process of continuous learning and improvement.