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KORE - Knowledge Sharing Platform on Resilience

Good practices and resilience

Knowledge sharing and capitalization of good practices have a key role to play in building the resilience of agriculture-based livelihoods. Considerable experience is being gained across sectors and ad-hoc solutions addressing shocks and crises are being found in many different contexts. A fair amount of these experiences are already being documented. However, the resilience-related knowledge gained needs to be systematically analysed, documented and shared so that development organizations and actors understand what works well and why and thus replicate and upscale identified good and promising practices in order to inform policies adequately.

Latest Good Practices

Delivering peace, agriculture-led growth and socio-economic transformation in the Horn of Africa
10 April 2019
The IGAD region is exposed to multiple hazards and recurrent shocks such as droughts, floods, socio-economic shocks and conflicts. Most of the population in the IGAD region rely on agriculture for their livelihoods, have limited capacity to cope with the [...]
05 February 2019
Without significant and well-planned adaptation efforts, climate change is predicted to have a marked effect on the agricultural sector in Eastern Africa – reducing agricultural yields and negatively impacting efforts to achieve food security and end hunger in the subregion. [...]
29 October 2018
Pine dieback, caused by bark beetles, is severely damaging Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) in Belarus and Ukraine. Forestry and the wood processing industry of Scots pine is relevant in Belarus and Ukraine from the economic, social and environmental perspective. In recent [...]
20 August 2018
Banana Bunchy Top Disease (BBTD) caused by the virus named Banana Bunchy Top Virus (BBTV) is listed among the world’s worst 100 invasive species. The disease is transmitted by the banana aphid Pentalonia nigronervosa and through infected propagation materials. BBTD is [...]
02 July 2018
The Mediterranean fruit fly (or medfly), Ceratitis capitata Wied., is considered a major agricultural pest worldwide because of its direct damage to fruit and vegetable production, and restrictions imposed to commercialization of horticultural commodities by countries free of the pest. [...]
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“Good”, “best” and “promising” practices

When identifying and documenting an experience, it is important to understand the different states of a practice, regarding the level of evidence and its replicability potential. And to recognize that not all experiences can be qualified as good practices.

A good practice can be defined as follows:

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A good practice is not only a practice that is good, but one that has been proven to work well and produce good results. It has been tested and validated through its various replications and is therefore recommended as a model and deserves to be shared, so that a greater number of people can adopt it.

"Best" vs "good" practices:

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The term “best practice” is often used; however, some will prefer to use “good practice” as “best practice” may imply that no further improvements are possible to the practice. It is indeed debatable whether there is a single ‘best’ approach knowing that approaches are constantly evolving and being updated.

For a practice to be considered as a “good practice”, it needs to be supported by a series of evidence obtained through data gathering and several replications. In some cases, a practice has the potential to become a “good practice” but cannot be yet qualified as one because of a lack of evidence and/or replications. In this case, it can be considered a “promising practice”.

 

A promising practice can be defined as follows:

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A promising practice has demonstrated a high degree of success in its single setting, and the possibility of replication in the same setting is guaranteed. It has generated some quantitative data showing positive outcomes over a period of time. A promising practice has the potential to become a good practice, but it doesn’t have enough research or has yet to be replicated to support wider adoption or upscaling. As such, a promising practice incorporates a process of continuous learning and improvement.