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Mitigación del Cambio Climático en la Agricultura

Artículos

Type: Articles
Year: 2013

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agriculture, including crop and livestock production, forestry and associated land use changes, are responsible for a significant fraction of anthropogenic emissions, up to 30% according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Yet while emissions from fossil fuels are updated yearly and by multiple sources—including national-level statistics from the International Energy Agency (IEA)—no comparable efforts for reporting global statistics for agriculture, forestry and other land use (AFOLU) emissions exist: the latest complete assessment was the 2007 IPCC report, based on 2005 emission data.

Type: Articles
Year: 2013

Better information on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and mitigation potential in the agricultural sector is necessary to manage these emissions and identify responses that are consistent with the food security and economic development priorities of countries. Critical activity data (what crops or livestock are managed in what way) are poor or lacking for many agricultural systems, especially in developing countries. In addition, the currently available methods for quantifying emissions and mitigation are often too expensive or complex or not sufficiently user friendly for widespread use. 

 

Type: Articles
Year: 2012

This article will introduce the MICCA pilot project in Kenya in the East Africa Dairy Development Project (EADD) in Kaptumo, where smallholder dairy farmers are integrating climate-smart practices into their farming activities.

Type: Articles
Year: 2012

Soil degradation has drawn great attention in soil and land studies over the last decades. The status of soils has been usually analyzed according to their components, focusing on their physical and chemical properties and their changes. However, only recently there have been attempts to aggregate the information into the single concept of soil health, identifying the capability of soil to support the present land use. A healthy soil is in equilibrium with the cover it supports. When this equilibrium is broken, the soil health deteriorates and the soil degrades. The organic carbon content in the soil (SOC) has been proposed to be used as an indicator of the soil health level. Whilst SOC is surely very signifi cant for such assessment, it should not be taken as a comprehensive indicator for all the aspects of soil health.

Type: Articles
Year: 2012

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agriculture, including crop and livestock production, forestry and associated land use changes, are responsible for a significant fraction of anthropogenic emissions. Using data from a new GHG global database developed at FAO, we focus on global indicator trends in the agriculture sectors, in relation to the carbon intensity of key food commodities. In particular, we find that the carbon intensity of meat and milk production decreased significantly over the period from 1961 to 2010, largely due to increases in animal productivity. At the same time, agricultural emissions nonetheless increased by 1.6% annually, reaching 5.4-5.8 Gt CO2 yr-1 in 2010.

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