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PUBLIC CLIMATE CHANGE DOCUMENTS RELATED TO THE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR, AND FINANCING MECANISMS

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Title/Abstract

Year

2011

Land and Climate Change finance in Central Afica

The aim of this study is to assess the state of play of climate change related financing and funding in the Central Africa sub-region, with a focus on UNCCD relevant activities and areas. The mapping exercise identifies the extent to which climate change related financing and funding has penetrated the sub-region, in which specific countries and sectors, where obvious gaps exist and where support is required. This includes a review of the institutional framework to assess the support structures in place for project development, the identification of projects successfully receiving either mitigation or adaptation funding, as well as support initiatives to help improve the region’s access to carbon markets. It is anticipated that these results will be used to help countries in the Central Africa subregion to formulate a strategy to improve their access to climate change related funding in UNCCD relevant areas, thus assisting this Convention to meet its goals.

KEYWORDS: Land and Climate Change finance, Central Africa, Global mecanism, COMIFAC

   

SOURCE: http://global-mechanism.org/dynamic/documents/document_file/ecosecurity-v7-english.pdf

2011

AN ANALYSIS OF NON-ANNEX I PARTIES NAMAs: Challenges for Designing International Support and Implementing an Effective MRV Framework

This paper analyses the Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) that non-Annex I Parties pledged to the UNFCCC in compliance with Appendix II provisions of the Copenhagen Accord. The purpose of the analysis is to suggest an effective framework for delivering international financial, technology, and capacity building support as well as a measuring, reporting, and verifying (MRV) GHG emission reductions. The paper shows NAMAs can be divided into four groups: 1) enabling conditions; 2) projects, programs and sectoral measures; 3) carbon neutrality; and 4) national GHG emission reduction targets. The diversity in NAMAs reflects the diverse mitigation needs of non-Annex I Parties and thus calls for a “layering” approach to international support and MRV for NAMAs. This paper further identifies remaining designing issues for an MRV framework by exploring what needs to be incorporated in guidelines for MRV and International Consultations and Analysis (ICA) to be adopted by COP.

KEYWORDS: Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs), Measurable, Reportable, Verifiable (MRV),

   

SOURCE: http://enviroscope.iges.or.jp/modules/envirolib/upload/3040/attach/cc-working-paper2010-001.pdf

2011

Making the Adaptation Fund work for the most vulnerable assessing progress in the Adaptation Fund

Climate change is already threatening many poor people and their chances of de-velopment. Unless these particularly vulnerable people are enabled to adapt to cli-mate change they will fall further into poverty. Effective and sustainable adaptation addresses the physical risks occurring with climate change by reducing vulnerabil-ity, increasing resilience and enhancing adaptive capacity. Ensuring that the Adap-tation Fund (AF) established under the Kyoto Protocol works for the most vulner-able people is rooted in international human rights obligations and enshrined in the strategic priorities of the AF. The innovative features of the Fund provide the po-tential for achieving this objective. Although the Fund has only just begun its concrete implementation phase, this pa-per identifies entry points where the Board of the Fund must focus its attentions in order to ensure it meets its priority, and makes recommendations.

KEYWORDS: Adaptation fund, Climate change, vulnerability, community based

   

SOURCE: http://www.germanwatch.org/klima/af2010-mvp.pdf

2011

Cancun Climate talks: keeping options open to close the gap

Current emission-reduction pledges fall short of what is needed to get the world on track for limiting global warming to 2 and 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. Both of these warming limits are mentioned the Cancun Agreements. While progress was made and adaptation, emission reduction no global target was set. To emissions need to drop to 44 adding up reduction proposals of individual countries and taking into account accounting provisions, expected global emissions leave a gap of 2020 to what is required. In Cancun, countries discussed a wide range of influence the size of the gap. They have proposed, with the shrink to 8-12 billion tonnes, provides an independent assessment of individual counties’ emission reduction proposals and their global aggregate status of the progress being made at international climate negotiations. The performed the analyses followed peer Nature and other journals)2 and significantly contributed to the UNEP Emissions Gap Report.

KEYWORDS: Cancun agreement, climate change, future

   

SOURCE: http://www.climateactiontracker.org/briefing_paper_cancun.pdf

2011

Longer-term climate finance after Cancun

The recent UN Climate Change Conference in Cancun may turn out to be a watershed in the international climate change regime. It has given the multilateral approach under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) a new lease of life. Even the Kyoto Protocol obituaries remain as exaggerated as when it entered into force,2 it is still alive. Concerning longer-term climate finance, the key outcome of Cancun is the decision by the Conference of the Parties (COP) in the Cancun LCA Agreement3 (i) to establish a Green Climate Fund, (ii) that a significant share of new multilateral funding for adaptation should flow through this fund, and (iii) to establish a Standing Committee under the COP to assist it in exercising its functions with respect to the UNFCCC financial mechanism. Everybody involved in bringing about this outcome deserved a good year-end holiday. But it is now time to roll up the sleeves even higher than last year, in order to carry out the substantial amount of work needed to implement these decisions by the next session of the COP in December 2011 in Durban, South Africa. The aim of this paper is to look at some of the main issues facing this implementation.

KEYWORDS: Cancun, UNFCC, climate finance

   

SOURCE: http://www.oxfordenergy.org/pdfs/comment_10_01_11.pdf

2011

Economis of adaptation to Climate Change, synthesis report

As developing countries weigh how best to revitalize their economies and craft a sustainable development path to boost living standards, they will have to factor in the reality that the global annual average temperature is expected to be 2º C above pre-industrial levels by 2050. A 2º warmer world will experience more intense rainfall and more frequent and more intense droughts, fl oods, heat waves, and other extreme weather events. As a result, it will have dramatic implications for how countries manage their economies, care for their people and design their development paths. Countries will need to adopt measures to adapt to climate change. These measures off er a way to make the eff ects of climate change less disruptive and spare the poor and the vulnerable from shouldering an unduly high burden. To address these objectives, the study was conducted on two parallel tracks: (1) a global track—a top-down approach, in which national databases were used to generate aggregate estimates at a global scale, drawing on a wide variety of sector studies; and (2) a country level track—a bottom-up approach, in which sub-national data were aggregated to generate estimates at economywide, sectoral, and local levels. Th is Synthesis Report integrates and summarizes the key findings of a global study report and seven country case study reports—covering Bangladesh, Bolivia, Ethiopia, Ghana, Mozambique, Samoa, and Vietnam (Figure ES-1). By providing information on lessons learned and insights gained on adaptation to climate change from global, country, and sector-level analyses, the hope is to help policymakers worldwide prioritize actions, along with developing a robust, integrated approach for greater resilience to climate risks. The Report begins with the concepts and methodology used for analyses in both the global and the country case studies, including a discussion of study limitations. This is followed by a synthesis of key results from the global and country tracks and a conclusion with lessons learned.

KEYWORDS: World bank, adaptation, Climate Change, economic development

   

SOURCE: http://beta.worldbank.org/sites/default/files/documents/EACCSynthesisReport.pdf

2011

Time now for taking Adaptation Seriously

Among development experts there is a widely held view that adaptation to climate change must be planned bottom up and many examples are shown how small communities have been able to tackle higher temperatures and irregular rainfall by changing their cropping patterns and crops. Such instances are indeed many but it should be remembered that non-technological innovations of this nature have only very narrow range within which they can provide some succour. Serious adaptation measures that can help tide over large changes in temperatures and precipitation are likely to be costly technology based efforts the demand for which would not arise bottom up but must, of necessity, be planned top down. Adaptation Planning is best done by a small team of experts happy to work among a noisy opinionated crowd of local stakeholders, willing to listen to them but knowing well that Grandma’s wisdom is good only for surviving a hot day’s outing in the sun.

KEYWORDS: Climate change, Adaptation, Technology Transfer

   

SOURCE: http://www.igrec.in/time_for_taking_adaptation_seriously.pdf

2011

REDD Should Create Jobs, Not Merely Bring Compensation

The REDD payments must not only be adequate but also reflect the realities of cost to different stakeholders and reach them without vanishing in corrupt practices. One way of approaching it is to make REDD Plus a positive action instead of a passive compensation for harm not done and making most of the payments to those who actually participate in such positive actions. These activities may include identification and survey of forest boundaries, maintenance of related land records, inventorying timber and non-timber forest produce, preparation of management plans, carrying out sustainable harvesting, first level value addition to the harvested product, setting up and managing decentralized biomass energy units sustainably for meeting local energy needs, replanting at least some of the previous years cleared lands, protection against fires and pests and promotion of ecotourism through laying trails and managing them, and capacity building of suitable members of the local communities for all the related activities. In the forestry sector an annual expenditure of $ 1 million creates between 500 to 1000 full time jobs in the developing countries and between 20 to 100 jobs in the developed countries. In these times of high unemployment in the Annex I countries, it would be a politically wise step to ensure that REDD creates a good number of jobs in developed economies, too, for the purpose of capacity building, planning, monitoring, reporting and verification. At annual investments of $ 20 billion, and with a quarter of money being spent within developed economies, REDD would have the potential of creating about 1,00,000 direct full time jobs in the developed countries besides 7.5 million full time forestry jobs in the developing economies.

KEYWORDS: REDD payment, Employment, Forest management

   

SOURCE: http://www.igrec.in/REDD_should_create_Jobs_Not_merely_bring_compensation.pdf

2011

Understanding Climate Change from below, addressing barriers from above

This report communicates the local, practical experiences and learning from one of the fi rst action research projects on community-based climate change adaptation interventions in Bangladesh: Assistance to Local Communities on Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction piloted by ActionAid Bangladesh and funded by the Embassy of Denmark. It is an action research project that facilitated local people’s analysis of their own vulnerability towards climate change and piloted a variety of community-based adaptation measures.

KEYWORDS: Adaptation, Climate Change, vulnerability, resilience

   

SOURCE: http://www.preventionweb.net/files/17233_17233understandingccfrombelow.pdf

Credits: Luc Dubreuil - Massimo Lupascu