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PUBLIC CLIMATE CHANGE DOCUMENTS RELATED TO THE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR, AND FINANCING MECANISMS

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Title/Abstract

Year

2008

Forests and energy

This paper describes that bioenergy offers the opportunity of reducing carbon dioxide emissions per unit energy production, reducing dependence on energy imports and, together with other alternative fuels, creating a cap on soaring oil prices and also there is great variation in the role of wood as a source of energy in different regions of the world

KEYWORDS: Bioenergy, Forestry

   

SOURCE: ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/010/i0139e/i0139e00.pdf

2008

Policies and practices for a low-carbon society

The work has focused on the strategic challenge of transforming our energy systems to create a more secure and sustainable future

KEYWORDS: Carbon

   

SOURCE: http://www.earthscanjournals.com/cp/008/cp008S005.htm

2008

The political economy of the CDM Executive Board

Based on data for about 250 methodologies and about 1000 projects discussed by the EB so far, this paper provides a first econometric analysis of this hypothesis. The results suggest that indeed, along with formal quality criteria, political-economic variables determine the final EB decision

KEYWORDS: CDM

   

SOURCE: http://www.cis.ethz.ch/publications/publications

2008

Migration and Climate Change

This report focuses on the possible future scenarios for climate change, natural disasters and migration and development, looking to increase awareness and find answers to the challenges that lie ahead.

KEYWORDS: Migration

   

SOURCE: http://www.iisd.org/pdf/2008/migration_climate.pdf

2008

The role of high-value crops in rural poverty reduction in the NENA Enabling poor rural people to overcome poverty

In their efforts to address the problems of poverty, IFAD and its partners in the Near East and North Africa (NENA) region are confronted by a large number of socio economic and environmental constraints. The experience of IFAD and the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) suggests that these limitations may best be resolved through innovation in farming systems and diversification in livelihoods. One promising avenue is the production and improved marketing of high-value crops (HVCs) of non-traditional horticultural types and the judicious use of herbal, medicinal and aromatic plants (HMAPs). To help define a practicable approach for the promotion of HVCs and HMAPs, and to direct the research agenda, IFAD and ICARDA organized two regional expert consultation workshops during 2007. The workshops were held at ICARDA headquarters in Aleppo, the Syrian Arab Republic. Both workshops attracted the attendance of about 50 delegates, representing NENA countries, other countries with relevant experiences in this field, a cross-section of donors, research and development institutions and private-sector firms active in HVCs and HMAPs. This summary report is a synthesis of the findings and conclusions of the workshops and illustrates the implications that will guide IFAD and its partners in promoting and supporting the development of these commodities as an approach to sustainable rural poverty reduction in the NENA region

KEYWORDS: NENA, agriculture

   

SOURCE: http://www.ifad.org/pub/thematic/index.htm#climate

2008

The role of high-value crops in rural poverty reduction in the NENA Enabling poor rural people to overcome poverty

In their efforts to address the problems of poverty, IFAD and its partners in the Near East and North Africa (NENA) region are confronted by a large number of socio economic and environmental constraints. The experience of IFAD and the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) suggests that these limitations may best be resolved through innovation in farming systems and diversification in livelihoods. One promising avenue is the production and improved marketing of high-value crops (HVCs) of non-traditional horticultural types and the judicious use of herbal, medicinal and aromatic plants (HMAPs). To help define a practicable approach for the promotion of HVCs and HMAPs, and to direct the research agenda, IFAD and ICARDA organized two regional expert consultation workshops during 2007. The workshops were held at ICARDA headquarters in Aleppo, the Syrian Arab Republic. Both workshops attracted the attendance of about 50 delegates, representing NENA countries, other countries with relevant experiences in this field, a cross-section of donors, research and development institutions and private-sector firms active in HVCs and HMAPs. This summary report is a synthesis of the findings and conclusions of the workshops and illustrates the implications that will guide IFAD and its partners in promoting and supporting the development of these commodities as an approach to sustainable rural poverty reduction in the NENA region

KEYWORDS: NENA, agriculture

   

SOURCE: http://www.ifad.org/pub/thematic/index.htm#climate

2008

Carbon Sunk? The Potential Impacts Of Avoided Deforestation Credits On Emissions Trading Mechanisms

There is an expectation amongst some observers - not the least some members of the conservation community - that inclusion of avoided deforestation credits into ‘Kyoto II’ mechanisms would generate sufficient funds to provide strong incentives to halt tropical forest destruction. However, the data in this report suggests that the absorption of substantial volumes of avoided deforestation credits within carbon markets is likely to be highly problematic unless there is a major increase in the markets due to negotiated commitments to very deep emissions reductions by Annex 1 countries.

KEYWORDS: REDD, forestry, carbon markets

   

SOURCE: http://www.rainforestfoundationuk.org/files/Carbon%20Sunk%20Report.pdf

2007

Innovations in Climate Risk Management: Protecting and Building Rural Livelihoods in a Variable and Changing Climate

We argue that more effective management of climate risk must be part of the response of the international agriculture community to the double crisis of persistent poverty and a changing climate. The most promising opportunities to adapt to climate change involve action on shorter time scales that also contributes to immediate development challenges. Climate risk management (CRM) combines systematic use of climate information, and technology that reduces vulnerability and policy that transfers risk. The cost of climate risk comes both through damaging extreme events and through forfeited opportunity in climatically-favorable years. Effective CRM therefore involves managing the full range of variability, balancing hazard management with efforts to capitalize on opportunity. We discuss several innovations for managing climate risk in agriculture, which have not yet been fully mainstreamed in international agricultural research-for-development. First, effective rural climate information services enable farmers to adopt technology, intensify production, and invest in more profitable livelihoods when conditions are favorable; and to protect families and farms against the long-term consequences of adverse extremes. Second, information and decision support systems synthesize historic, monitored and forecast climate information into forms that are directly relevant to institutional decisions (planning, trade, food crisis response) that impact farmer livelihoods. Third, innovations in index-based insurance and credit overcome some of the limitations of traditional insurance, and are being applied to pre-financing food crisis response, and to removing credit constraints to adopting improved technology. We present a typology of CRM interventions around the concept of dynamic poverty traps.

KEYWORDS: climate risk management, agriculture

   

SOURCE: http://www.icrisat.org

2007

Carbon market report

Forecasts related to Carbon Credit supply in future period.

KEYWORDS: Carbon, markets

   

SOURCE: IDEACarbon, http://www.ideacarbon.com/

Credits: Luc Dubreuil - Massimo Lupascu