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PUBLIC CLIMATE CHANGE DOCUMENTS RELATED TO THE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR, AND FINANCING MECANISMS

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Title/Abstract

Year

2011

The Climate Technology Mechanism: Issues and

The agreement to establish a Technology Mechanism is one of the concrete outcomes of the Cancun climate change conference (2010) that requires a closer look. The main goal of the Mechanism is to enhance action for technology development and transfer, particularly to developing countries, in support of climate change mitigation and adaptation. It is premised on the recognition that the large-scale deployment and diffusion of these technologies is pivotal to worldwide efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, the Mechanism faces many challenges before it can become operational. For instance, it is not clear how well resourced it will be. In addition, many of its functions need to be further ‘fleshed out’ and a number of institutional issues such as the relationship between its two main components – the Technology Executive Committee and the Climate Technology Centre and Network – still need to be agreed. The objective of this publication is to shed some light on the main features and functions of the Technology Mechanism and on some of these challenges.

KEYWORDS: technology development and transfer, climate change mitigation and adaptation, greenhouse gas emissions

   

SOURCE: http://ictsd.org/i/publications/103789/

2011

The REDD Safeguards of Cancun

Reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation and the role of conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks in developing countries has been recognized as a major climate change mitigation tool. But since deforestation and forest degradation so often accompany extreme poverty, particularly among the indigenous people and forest dependent communities, it has been argued that unless properly safeguarded REDD can further impoverish the lives of the poor besides impinging negatively on biodiversity, food security and on national sovereignty. The Cancun Agreement has now addressed these concerns through well designed safeguards. By making REDD primarily responsible for meeting the basic objectives of Article 2 of the UNFCCC that requires climate change mitigation without harming food security and economic development it has been ensured that the REDD activities that discourage future extension of agriculture over forested lands would have to be accompanied by enhanced agricultural productivity so that the food production is not threatened and economic development moves apace. Further the agreement has emphasized REDD as a voluntary mitigation action by developing countries that can only be undertaken taking into account national legislation and sovereignty. Cancun has laid a sound foundation on which a more comprehensive architecture for REDD that includes a market based mechanism can be built in the coming years.

KEYWORDS: REDD, food security, indigenous people, biodiversity, sovereignty

   

SOURCE: http://igrec.in/The_REDD_Safeguards_of_Cancun.pdf

2011

Assuring food security in developing countries under the challenges of Climate Change: key trade and development issues of a fondamental transformation of agriculture

For a large number of developing countries, agriculture remains the single most important sector. Climate change has the potential to damage irreversibly the natural resource base on which agriculture depends, with grave consequences for food security. Agriculture (and related land-use changes) is the most important emitter of global greenhouse gases (more important than all energy-intensive industries taken together and even bigger than the power sector). However, agriculture is the sector that also has the potential to transcend from being a problem to becoming an essential part of the solution to climate change provided there is a more holistic vision of food security, agricultural mitigation, climate-change adaptation and agriculture’s pro-poor development contribution. What is required is a rapid and significant shift from conventional, industrial, monoculture-based and high-external-input dependent production towards mosaics of sustainable production systems that also considerably improve the productivity of small-scale farmers. The required transformation is much more profound than simply tweaking the existing industrial agricultural systems. However, the sheer scale at which modified production methods would have to be adopted, the significant governance and market-structure challenges at national and international level and the considerable difficulties involved in measuring, reporting and verifying reductions in GHG emissions pose considerable challenges.

KEYWORDS: Climate Change, Greenhouse gas reduction, Agriculture mitigation

   

SOURCE: http://www.unctad.org/en/docs/osgdp20111_en.pdf

2011

Rapport de l'atelier d'échange de connaissances et de renforcement des capacités: Possibilités d’investissement pour la gestion durable des terres (GDT) grâce aux mécanismes de financement associés au changement climatique en Afrique Centrale

L’objectif principal de l’atelier était de renforcer, au niveau national et sous-régional, les capacités d’accès aux mécanismes de financement associés aux Changements Climatiques pour augmenter les investissements dans la Gestion Durable des Terres (GDT) dans les paysages dégradés d’Afrique Centrale.

KEYWORDS: Climate change, Sustainable Land Management, Financing mechanism, Central Africa

   

SOURCE:

2011

SAN Climate Module: Criteria for the Mitigation of and Adaptation to Climate Change

The Rainforest Alliance, the Sustainable Agriculture Network and project partners are pleased to announce the launch of the SAN Climate Module: Criteria for the Mitigation of and Adaptation to Climate Change. The new climate module aims to make farmers more aware of the impacts of climate change and to promote the adoption of good agricultural practices that reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, increase carbon sequestration and enhance the capacity of farms to adapt to climate change.

KEYWORDS: Tool, Climate Change, mitigation, adaptation, farmers

   

SOURCE: http://sanstandards.org/userfiles/file/SAN%20Climate%20Module%20February%202011.pdf

2011

Bioenergy, Land Use Change and Climate Change Mitigation

This report was prepared by Associate Professor Göran Berndes, of Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; with input from contributing authors Dr Neil Bird, Joanneum Research, Austria and Professor Annette Cowie, The National Centre for Rural Greenhouse Gas Research, Australia. It was co-financed by IEA Bioenergy and the Swedish Energy Agency. The report addresses a much debated issue – bioenergy and associated land use change, and how the climate change mitigation from use of bioenergy can be influenced by greenhouse gas emissions arising from land use change. The purpose of the report was to produce an unbiased, authoritative statement on this topic aimed especially at policy advisors and policy makers.

KEYWORDS: Bioenergy, Land use chang, climate change, mitigation

   

SOURCE: http://www.ieabioenergy.com/LibItem.aspx?id=6770

2011

Toward a Green Economy

The report asserts that an investment of 2% of global gross domestic product (GDP), or US$1.3 trillion per year, into 10 key sectors could trigger "greener, smarter growth" while fighting poverty, through a transition to a low-carbon, resource-efficient economy. An investment of that amount "would grow the global economy at around the same rate" as under current economic models, or higher. The new, green model would also remove the inherent risks, shocks, scarcities, and crises of the current model (the "brown economy"). The 10 sectors, where UNEP says investment would be key to building a green economy are: agriculture, buildings, energy supply, fisheries, forestry, industry including energy efficiency, tourism, transport, waste management and water.

KEYWORDS: Green economy, UNEP, sustainable development, poverty eradication

   

SOURCE: http://www.unep.org/greeneconomy/Portals/88/documents/ger/GER_synthesis_en.pdf

2011

Cancún De-briefing: An Analysis of the Cancún Agreements

Within this report, we highlight some of these key issue areas under discussion in the COP16 and CMP6 meetings: adaptation, capacity building, technology transfer, finance, REDD+, and the flexibility mechanisms: CDM and JI. Within these sections, we make note of the background of these areas leading into Cancún, discuss some of the issues under debate, and discuss their subsequent outcomes. We then turn our attention to other notable conclusions contained or missing from the Cancún Agreements and look to the road ahead in 2011 as Parties prepare for next year’s COP and CMP conference in Durban, South Africa.

KEYWORDS: COP16, Cancun agreement, Project-Based Mechanisms: CDM & JI, adaptation, REDD+, finance

   

SOURCE: http://indigenouspeoplesissues.com/attachments/article/8980/Cancun%20De-briefing.pdf

2011

Impact of Climate Change on Bioenergy and Nutrition

"This paper, prepared for the High Level Conference on World Food Security: The Challenge of Climate Change and Bioenergy (Rome, 3-5 June 2008), explores the implications of climate change and rising bioenergy demand for nutrition. It examines the direct nutrition effects of rising bioenergy demand, as well as its contribution to rising food prices. The paper begins by describing the current state of global food insecurity and malnutrition and the causes, consequences and costs of food insecurity and malnutrition. A number of factors besides climate change, bioenergy and rising prices that can contribute to malnutrition in the future are also discussed. Finally, a chapter on policy implications provides several options for improving food security and nutrition, as well as for addressing the links between climate change and bioenergy demand and nutrition."

KEYWORDS: Climate change, Food securition, nutrition, bioenergy

   

SOURCE: ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/010/ai799e/ai799e00.pdf

2011

Climate proofing for development: adapting to Climate Change, reducing risks

How can institutions operating in climate-sensitive sectors (for example agriculture, forestry, spatial planning, urban development and nature conservation) assess the impacts of climate change on their work? How can they determine what action is needed? How can they adapt their plans and ensure they are making the right decisions? What further steps can they take? Since 2007, GTZ/GIZ has developed the ‘Climate Proofing for Development’ approach to help governmental and non-governmental institutions answer these questions. The approach is currently being implemented in more than ten countries around the world. A new publication has been produced that describes the method and how it works using examples and best practices. It also draws conclusions based on the experience gathered so far.

KEYWORDS: GIZ, Climate proofing, risk reduction, adaptation

   

SOURCE: http://www2.gtz.de/dokumente/bib-2010/gtz2010-0714en-climate-proofing.pdf

Credits: Luc Dubreuil - Massimo Lupascu