TCI-ClimateChange@fao.org

PUBLIC CLIMATE CHANGE DOCUMENTS RELATED TO THE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR, AND FINANCING MECANISMS

The library is being populated with the most relevant publications, including the latest ones of 2011.

Should you have any documents you wish to share with us, please send them to us with your comments for posting in the Library!

Title/Abstract

Year

2011

International climate financing: From Cancún to a 2°C stabilisation pathway

This paper examines potential sources of revenues and analyses, which instruments are most compatible with these sources and the climate objectives. Ultimately, the paper provides suggestions for progress in international climate financing after Cancún, towards a 2°C stabilisation pathway.

KEYWORDS: Climate Finance, After Cancun, Climate objectives

   

SOURCE:

2011

NEFCO Carbon Finance and Funds

News NEFCO Carbon Finance and Funds Unit Releases Operational Review 20102 February 2011: The Carbon Finance and Funds Unit of the Nordic Environment Finance Corporation (NEFCO) has released its Operational Review for 2010, which highlights new financing mechanisms. The Review features sections on: a review of operations; new climate finance facilities and initiatives; the NEFCO Carbon Fund (NeCF); a case study on wind energy developments in Oaxaca state, Mexico; the Baltic Sea Region Testing Ground Facility (TGF); an overview of the Carbon Finance and Funds (CFF) Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)/Joint Implementation (JI) portfolio; and a case study on climate-proofed water storage and conservation strategies in Ghana. The Review also highlights the 2010 launch by NEFCO of a new climate guarantee facility, ProClimate, which seeks to unite loan guarantees to carbon financing. The facility is implemented jointly with the Nordic Development Fund (NDF).

KEYWORDS: Carbon Finance, financing mechanisms, CDM

   

SOURCE: http://www.nefco.org/files/310111-CFF-2010-FINAL-v4-screen.pdf

2011

UNFCCC the future of the process

The Report looks at certain near-term actions that can be taken to restore the trust that has been lost in the UNFCCC process over the last few years. Cancun was no doubt a turning point in that respect, but the recovery process is still fragile and requires particular attention to how the process is being managed. The Report looks at the use of small groups, be it during negotiations or informal consultations, and considers the way in which high-level stakeholders are to give guidance to the process and it gives a number of simple and hopefully practical ideas for dealing with these issues in a way that benefits the Process.

KEYWORDS: UNFCCC, future strategies, after Cancun

   

SOURCE: http://www.climatestrategies.org/our-reports/category/55/302.html

2011

Community Champions: Adapting to Climate Challenges

This publication contains abstracts (mainly in English, some in French) from papers presented at the fourth International Conference on Community-Based Adaptation to Climate Change which was held on 21-27 February 2010 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The Conference was structured around plenary and technical sessions on a variety of important subject areas such as agriculture, water resources, and ecosystems to cross-cutting issues of policy, funding, and strengthening institutions. Nearly a hundred projects were showcased and demonstrate the sheer variety and innovation of current community-based projects. The projects are a resource for information sharing and learning.

KEYWORDS: Adaptation, Climate change, Agriculture, Community based

   

SOURCE: http://pubs.iied.org/pdfs/10028IIED.pdf

2011

IFAD, FAO and ILO Release Report on Gender and Agriculture

The report, titled "Gender dimensions of agricultural and rural employment: Differentiated pathways out of poverty," is based on a 2009 workshop that sought to identify best practices for addressing gender inequalities, as well as gaps in data and research. It addresses the current trends in rural employment impacting gender roles, including, international trade, migration and HIV/AIDS. It also highlights gender constraints related to unpaid work, education, and access to land, credit and markets. The report explores the consequences of gender inequalities, underscoring policy options related to fundamental rights, creation of employment, social protection and social dialogue. The report also includes papers that were contributed to the workshop on specific cases from Mexico, South Africa, the Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam. The report also notes that climate change, as well as the global food, fuel and financial crises, constitute new challenges to the achievement of poverty reduction and gender equality in the rural world. It underlines that these processes are not sufficiently documented yet to permit any sound assessment, but formulates some tentative considerations related to the gender differentiated effects of climate change mitigation and adaptation policies

KEYWORDS: Gender, rural employment, poverty, climate change, agriculture

   

SOURCE: http://www.ifad.org/pub/gender/agriculture/GRE_WEB.pdf

2011

The future of food and farming: Challenges and choices for global sustainability

The Foresight project Global Food and Farming Futures explores the increasing pressures on the global food system between now and 2050. The Report highlights the decisions that policy makers need to take today, and in the years ahead, to ensure that a global population rising to nine billion or more can be fed sustainably and equitably. The Foresight report makes a compelling case for urgent action to redesign the global food system to meet the challenge of feeding the world over the next 40 years

KEYWORDS: Food security, Farming, population, production, prices

   

SOURCE: http://www.bis.gov.uk/assets/bispartners/foresight/docs/food-and-farming/11-546-future-of-food-and-farming-report.pdf

2011

Regional implication of the Advisory Group on Climate Finance (AGF) recommandations: Africa

Building on the Copenhagen Accord, the United Nations Secretary’s High-Level Advisory Group on Climate Change Finance (AGF) was set up in February 2010 to identify how industrialised countries could mobilise US$100 billion of resources per year by 2020, to support climate-resilient development in the developing world. The Group consisted of 21 members, from the public and private sectors and from the developed and developing worlds. It was co-chaired by the Meles Zenawi, Prime Minister of Ethiopia, and Jens Stoltenberg, Prime Minister of Norway. Working through most of 2010, it has analysed a wide range of options for raising this money from both public and private sources. The AGF reported in November 2010 that reaching the goal of US$100 billion was ‘challenging but feasible’.

KEYWORDS: Climate Finance, Africa

   

SOURCE: http://cdkn.preprod.headshift.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/AGF-Implications-Africa-CDKN-Special-Briefing-small1.pdf

2011

Technology needs assessment for Climate Change

This updated Technology Needs Assessment Handbook is designed to assist countries in making informed decisions in their technology choices. Building on lessons from earlier TNA efforts over the past decade, it offers a systematic approach for conducting technology needs assessments in order to identify, evaluate and prioritize technological means for both mitigation and adaptation. It also provides processes and methodologies for uncovering gaps in enabling frameworks and capacities and for formulating a national action plan to overcome them, as part of overall climate change strategies and plans such as NAMAs and NAPAs.

KEYWORDS: Climate change, technology, NAMAs, NAPAs, UNDP, UNFCCC

   

SOURCE: http://content.undp.org/go/cms-service/stream/asset/?asset_id=2972062

2011

Further important steps underlining the role of the Adaptation fund

The Adaptation Fund (AF) was established under the Kyoto Protocol of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in order to finance concrete adaptation projects and programmes, which should support the adaptation of developing countries to negative impacts of climate change. This report highlights and summarises the key issues on the agenda of the 12th meeting of the Adaptation Fund Board, and outlines some actions being taken by the Board. These include the approval for another two AF projects (Nicaragua and Pakistan) and some more project concepts. However, a number of projects submitted were also rejected. With regard to direct access, there was little progress since no further National Implementing Entities were ready for accreditation. Other issues on the agenda included the first formal meeting with civil society observers, consideration of the financial status of the AF and activities during the Cancun COP. As Germanwatch has been following all of the meetings one can find elaborate information on the Adaptation Fund and the past meetings on our web page www.germanwatch.org/klima/af. Official background information and the preparatory documents for the 12th meeting can be found at www.adaptation-fund.org.

KEYWORDS: Adaptation fund, Climate Change, Implementation entities

   

SOURCE: http://www.germanwatch.org/klima/afb2011-01r.pdf

2011

Taking a climate chance: A procedural critique of Vietnam’s climate change strategy

This article asks through what processes and for which interests the emerging Vietnamese climate change strategy is being designed, and if, ultimately, it is likely or not to be effective in the face of the looming threat. Through a review of an emerging body of literature and field observations, the paper finds the strategy partial and problematic in several ways. Its technocratic process prevents a pluralist representation of interests, obfuscating and perpetuating sectorial ones, at the expense of a more transparent and democratic resource allocation. The strategy therefore reflects and reinforces existing power relations in both politics and production. It feeds into a business-as-usual complacency, protecting national and international interests vested in unchallenged continuity, even when considering post-carbon technological fixes, which largely serve to expand capital accumulation opportunities. The article concludes that the national climate change strategy provides an illusion of intervention and security, but largely fails to identify and mitigate the underlying causes of climate change, or to lay the ground for a robust mid- and long-term adaptation strategy that can cope with yet unknown levels of climatic and other structural changes.

KEYWORDS: adaptation, climate change, political ecology, political economy, Vietnam

   

SOURCE: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8373.2010.01428.x/pdf

Credits: Luc Dubreuil - Massimo Lupascu