Natural Resources
     and Environment

News, Publications & Announcements - Climate Change

April 2007
Assistance to improve local agricultural emergency preparedness in Caribbean countries highly prone to hurricane related disasters
Grenada Case Study - Interim finding and recommendations (TCO/RLA/3101)

Natural disasters have severely destabilized the socio-economic fabric of the Caribbean region in the last two decades, with the most devastating impacts experienced in 2004. According to the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters, at least 6,000 lives were lost, and over one million people were affected by natural disasters in the region in 2004. Comprehensive assessments of the impacts of natural disasters on five Caribbean countries revealed that the extraordinary active hurricane season during that year resulted in damages approximating US $5.7 billion. Moreover, the productive sectors which include agriculture accounted for over one third (35.2%) of associated damages and losses. Such events have exposed the socio-cultural and environmental vulnerabilities of the Caribbean basin, and the urgent need to rethink disaster management options. A comprehensive approach to disaster risk reduction however, has not been integrally incorporated into the agriculture sector within the region. This strategic deficient landscape has significantly reduced the resilience of the sector to cope with extreme hydro-meteorological hazards such as Hurricane Ivan. In recognition of the immense negative impact of the 2004 hurricane season on the farming community, and the urgent call for assistant from regional policy makers, the Food and Agricultural Organization funded ...

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April 2007
Adaptation to climate change in agriculture, forestry and fisheries
Perspective, framework and priorities

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) provides that all Parties must formulate and implement national or regional programmes containing measures to facilitate adequate adaptation to climate change. It lists specific domains in particular need of adaptation, namely coastal zones, water resources, agriculture, and areas affected by drought and desertification, as well as floods. Included among this list are specific reference to: small island countries, countries with forest areas liable to forest decay, countries prone to natural disasters, and countries with fragile ecosystems, including mountain ecosystems. The croplands, pastures and forests that occupy 60 percent of the Earth’s surface are progressively being exposed to threats from increased climatic variability and, in the longer run, to climate change. Abnormal changes in air temperature and rainfall and resulting increases in frequency and intensity of drought and flood events have long-term implications for the viability of these ecosystems. As climatic patterns change, so also do the spatial distribution of agroecological zones, habitats, distribution patterns of plant diseases and pests, fish populations and ocean circulation patterns which can have significant impacts on agriculture and food production.

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April 2007
Adaptation to climate change in agriculture, forestry and fisheries Perspective, framework and priorities
This is a publication of the Interdepartmental Working Group on Climate Change

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) provides that all Parties must formulate and implement national or regional programmes containing measures to facilitate adequate adaptation to climate change. It lists specific domains in particular need of adaptation, namely coastal zones, water resources, agriculture, and areas affected by drought and desertification, as well as floods. Included among this list are specific reference to: small island countries, countries with forest areas liable to forest decay, countries prone to natural disasters, and countries with fragile ecosystems, including mountain ecosystems. The croplands, pastures and forests that occupy 60 percent of the Earth’s surface are progressively being exposed to threats from increased climatic variability and, in the longer run, to climate change. Abnormal changes in air temperature and rainfall and resulting increases in frequency and intensity of drought and flood events have long-term implications for the viability of these ecosystems. As climatic patterns change, so also do the spatial distribution of agroecological zones, habitats, distribution patterns of plant diseases and pests, fish populations and ocean circulation patterns which can have significant impacts on agriculture and food production.

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For related information, see the following theme pages: -Climate Change  
June 2001
World Summit on Sustainable Development
Johannesburg 2002

The Johannesburg summit is a follow-up of the first Earth Summit held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. The Earth Summit represented a turning point in the way we look at environment and development; world leaders adopted Agenda 21, a blue print to attain sustainable development in the 21st century.FAO is task manager for many of the land-related chapters of Agenda 21, chiefly, chapter 10 (Integrated Planning and Management of Land Resources), chapter 11 (Combating Deforestation), chapter 13 (Sustainable Mountain Development) and on chapter 14 (Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development: SARD). It is also a major partner in the implementation of several chapters of Agenda 21, notably, chapters 12 (Combating Desertification and Drought), 15 (Biological Diversity), 17 (Oceans and Seas) 18 (Freshwater) and 19 (Toxic Chemicals). FAO is actively involved in contributing to the Rio+10 process and particularly as regards the preparation of documentation for the intergovernmental process. FAO looks forward to Rio+10 as it will provide a unique opportunity to draw to the attention of world leaders some of the key challenges and opportunities the global community faces in the implementation of various chapters of Agenda 21 for which it is a leader and major partner. We trust the ...

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June 2001
Strengthening pastoral institutions in North-West China pastoral area to access improved extension services for risk management and poverty alleviation

Located in the central part of western China, Qinghai Province is one of the poorest provinces in China. Dari County, the case study area, is located in the south-eastern part of Qinghai-Tibetan High Plateau. Due to Dari’s special geographical location with an average altitude ranging from 3500 to 4000 meters above the sea level, extensive pastoral production systems play an overwhelming role in the local economy. However, the harsh climate determines a high-risk environment and the mainly Tibetan herders are living under difficult and poor conditions with very weak risk prevention and avoiding capacities and capabilities.This report documents the in-depth situation assessment on Pastoral Risk Management and Poverty Alleviation, in Dari County. It identifies the current risks and poverty evidences existing in the county and it compares perceptions, and recomendations of different stakeholders to improve current pastoral risks management approaches and practice.

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