Land Resources

News

March 2014
Stocktaking Landscape Initiatives work by FAO and Partners Global Land Cover SHARE (GLC-SHARE)
Assesing and monitoring our Earth’s land and water resources to support Food Security and Early Warning System with contributions from all

FAO’s new database includes eleven global land cover layers each representing the major land cover classes defined by the FAO andSystem of environmental-Economic Accounting (SEEA) legend.

It brings global land cover data under one roof for the first time and represents the most-reliable global view of planetary land cover assembled to-date.

This new product collects previously scattered and unharmonized land cover information from around the globe into one centralized database, marking a major improvement in information regarding the physical characteristics of the Earth’s surface.

Up to now, one of the major challenges for countries and organizations was to identify, measure and record efficiently a good global overview of land cover. 

The GLCSHARE database has been:   

ƒcompiled with data pulled from multiple sources; ƒquality controlled and harmonized using internationallyaccepted definitions and standards; produced to bring a wealth of country-level information into one consolidated dataset spanning the entire planet.

Applications of the new database include monitoring of global land cover trends, evaluating the suitability of land for various uses, assessing the impact of climate change on food production, and land-use planning. 

The basic concept and principles applied aim to integrate the best land cover data available, from local to global, into one single database using international standards; this task requires the harmonization among different layers and legends to create a consistent product 

 

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July 2013
Stocktaking Landscape Initiatives work by FAO and Partners Stocktaking Landscape Initiatives work by FAO and Partners

FAO Natural Resources Management and Environment Department (NR) has started a process to gather information on landscape/territorial approaches which are planned, being implemented or have been finalized to identify opportunities to improve synergies and collaborate more effectively to strengthen support to member countries and partners in this regard. As part of this process a pilot survey was undertaken in February 2013. A summary of the results from the pilot survey is available for your reference.

This further survey is to collect further information on the diverse landscape/territorial initiatives to obtain a more complete representation of the suite of work under-taken and, thereby, to effectively inform and facilitate this harmonization and outreach process.

We welcome an active response from relevant FAO technical/officers, project staff and your direct partners (-> Survey closes July 24)

Thank you for your cooperation.

*** ENTER THE SURVEY ***

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June 2013
Review of evidence on drylands pastoral systems and climate change - Implications and opportunities for mitigation and adaptation CA-CoP Newsletter - Alert N. 29 (30 April 2013)

CONSERVATION AGRICULTURE COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE for sustainable production intensification

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February 2010
Review of evidence on drylands pastoral systems and climate change - Implications and opportunities for mitigation and adaptation Review of evidence on drylands pastoral systems and climate change - Implications and opportunities for mitigation and adaptation

The review highlights the significant untapped potential for climate change mitigation and adaptation associated with improved management of grazing lands in pastoral systems and rangelands. Grasslands and rangelands deserve greater attention, not only for their large extent, widespread degradation and limited resilience to drought and desertification, but also for their potential capacity to sequester and store carbon in soils. Degradation of the land base negatively affects the accumulation of carbon in the soils. Thus, reversing land degradation in extensive dryland areas through improved pasture and rangeland management would contribute to restoring the soil carbon sink while also improving livelihoods of pastoral and agropastoral peoples. The review also highlights the multiple benefits of enhancing ecosystem services and processes for improving livelihoods while contributing to adaptation to climate change impacts. Realizing this potential will require increased awareness and coordinated global efforts alongside interventions that address associated socio-political and economic barriers, such as land tenure constraints and inadequate services for, and political marginalization of, pastoral and agropastoral communities. The opportunity to support climate change mitigation in drylands that will simultaneously contribute to climate change adaptation and reduced vulnerability of pastoral societies should be a key area of focus in post-Kyoto mechanisms.

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February 2010
Guidelines for constructing small-scale map legends now available Guidelines for constructing small-scale map legends now available

The guidelines for constructing small-scale map legends using the World Reference Base for Soil Resources is now ready.
In this addendum to the WRB 2006, the guidelines are provided to construct map units (or soil typological units) and map legends for scales of 1:250 000 and smaller.

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