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وثائق

Private Sector
27 May 2016
This publication examines 70 PPP cases from 15 developing countries to better understand the approach various countries have used in developing PPPs for agri-food systems around the world.   It includes a summary of the main lessons learned and recommendations on how to enable more effective partnerships with the private sector through improved public skills and more effective institutions.
South-south Cooperation
08 Mar 2016
South-South Cooperation (SSC) is a cost-effective mechanism for sharing knowledge, resources and developing capacities among countries of the global South. Global demand for successful SSC and Triangular Cooperation is at an all-time high and FAO’s Corporate SSC Strategy aims to facilitate SSC development solutions to achieve food security, poverty reduction and sustainable agriculture.
South-south Cooperation
17 Sep 2015
There is a growing consensus around the world, affirming South-South and Triangular Cooperation as effective instruments for catalyzing agricultural development. South-South Cooperation (SSC) is widely accepted as a complementary model of development cooperation to the traditional NorthSouth model, in overcoming common challenges and achieving food security, poverty reduction and the sustainable management of natural resources.
Resource Partners
13 Jul 2015
For several decades, Japan has been among the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations’ (FAO) foremost partners in feeding the hungry and caring for the earth. The country ranks second in assessed contributions to FAO’s regular budget, and fourth in terms of voluntary contributions in 2012-2013. It is also among the top contributors to the 2 500 ongoing field programmes, with a total value of nearly USD 800 million.  It also provides expertise in the fields of agriculture, fisheries and forestry, contributing valuable human resources to various FAO projects.
South-south Cooperation
15 Jun 2015
Brazil has made tremendous progress in reducing malnutrition. In 1990, 14.8 percent of the population suffered from hunger; the figure is now just 1.7 percent. This remarkable transformation owes much to the country’s school feeding programme. By 2014, the programme was supplying approximately 43 million pupils with one or more servings of food per day, in almost 250 000 schools across the country. By Brazilian law, at least 30 percent of the food must be sourced from family farms, thus providing significant benefits to over 120 000 rural families. 
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