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ACHIEVING ECONOMICAL SUSTAINABILITY IN SHEEP AND GOAT HUSBANDRY:
A QUESTION OF MARKETS AND LAND-USE

Boutonnet, J.P.
INRA/ESR, 2, place Viala, 34060
Montpellier Cedex 1, France

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ABSTRACT

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INTRODUCTION

SOME CHARACTERISTICS OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

1. Animal husbandry can use three types of feeding resources (Boutonnet, 1997): natural pasture, by-products and crops. Natural pastures are not created by human labour and the feed provided has no production cost. The amount of animals maintained on it depends on its availability and accessibility (social and demographic conditions). By-products may be domestic or industrial. In the first case the amount of animals depends on the number of families. In the second case, it depends on the quantity of the main products (for example, grain) from which the by-products come (e.g. bran). Both on range-land and by-product, the amount of animal products do not depend on the market (demand and price) of the product, but on the available resources (Figure 1).

Figure 1. Nature of animal husbandry

Table 1. Husbandry patterns

Resources

Products

Natural Pasture

By-product

Cultivated forage

Rm diased forage

Several co-products

Pastoral

Backyard
(Urban or rural)

   
 

Peasant

One product

Randing

   

Industrial

SOME CHARACTERISTICS OF SMALL RUMINANTS

Table 2. World use of raw material by the textile industry 1800-1990

     

1800

1900

1950

1990

     

Million tonne

%

Million tonne

%

Million tonne

%

Million tonne

%

Total

   

0.6

100

4

100

12

100

41

100

 

Of which

Wool

0.2

33

0.8

21

1.0

8

1.5

4

   

Linen

0.3

50

0.6

15

0.4

3

0.7

2

   

Cotton

0.1

17

2.0

50

8.4

70

18.4

45

   

Artificial fiber

-

-

-

-

1.7

14

19.1

47

CONSUMPTION

CONDITIONS FOR SUSTAINABILITY OF SHEEP AND GOAT HUSBANDRY

REFERENCES

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