Organic fertilizers (including manure and compost)
 

Naturally occurring organic fertilizers include (green) manure, slurry, worm castings, peat, seaweed, humic acid, guano, sewage sludge, compost, bloodmeal, bone meal.

Many organic materials serve both as fertilizers and soil conditioners: they feed the soil and the plants. This is one of the most important differences between a chemical approach and an organic approach toward soil care and fertilizing. Soluble chemical fertilizers contain mineral salts that plant roots can absorb quickly. However, they do not provide a food source for soil microorganisms and earthworms. Over time, soils treated only with synthetic chemical fertilizers lose organic matter and the living organisms that help to build a quality soil.

Therefore using organic fertilizers has a positive impact on water pollution, soil erosion and fertility.

 

 

Title

Authors

Country

Date

Green manure/cover crops and crop rotation in Conservation Agriculture on small farms

FAO

All

2011

Blending guide for low-analysis organic fertilizers

Kerr centre for sustainable agriculture, Oklahoma

USA

2012

Soils and Fertilizers

Craig Cogger, Washington State University

USA

/

Organic fertilization in a Sugarbush

Jeff Levesque, Faculté de foresterie, Université de Moncton, Campus d’Edmundston

Canada

/

Manure for vegetables

Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FIBL)

Europe

2011

Manual of On-Farm Vermicomposting and Vermiculture

English   -   French

Glenn Munroe, Organic Agriculture Centre of Canada

Canada

/

On-Farm composting methods

FAO

All

/

Think manures - A guide to manure management

Environment Agency

UK

2011

How to make and use compost

S. Edwards and H. Araya, Institute for Sustainable Development (ISD), Ethiopia

Sub-Saharan Africa

2011

Guidelines for Sustainable Manure Management in Asian Livestock Production Systems

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

Asia

2008