VALUE-CHAIN IN SMALL SCALE FISHERIES
 

 

 

A VALUE-CHAIN ANALYSIS OF INTERNATIONAL FISH TRADE AND FOOD SECURITY WITH AN IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF THE SMALL-SCALE SECTOR

A FAO PROJECT * 

FAO and the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD) have initiated a comprehensive value-chain analysis of international fish trade with an impact assessment of the small-sale sector in developing countries . The aim is to identify ways to improve food security for local populations through more informed policy decisions.

Background: Fish exports a major source of income for developing countries 

Fish exports and trade is a major source of income for developing countries. They now represent close to 50% of global fish exports with their annual net export revenues exceeding US$ 25 billion. Jobs are created in production, processing and trade, and local food-security is strengthened through the nutritional contribution of fish to human consumption.
 
In fish production, capture fisheries as well as fish farming, a large share is carried out by the small-scale sector. It is therefore of crucial importance to arrive at polices that safeguard the interests of the small-scale producers not only by enabling them to access international markets but also to obtain prices and margins that let them achieve long-term sustainability from an economic, social and biological resource perspective.

Project objective: Improved knowledge of value-chain dynamics

The objective of the project is to achieve a better understanding of the dynamics of relevant value-chains in international fish trade and arrive at policy recommendations. The project will analyse the distribution of benefits in the value-chain and the linkages between the relative benefits obtained and the design of the chain. Comparisons will be made between domestic, regional and international value-chains with the view to understand better how developing countries can increase the value derived from their fishery resources.

Case studies: Small-scale sector in eleven developing and five developed countries

The study will in part build on available value-chain analyses carried out by other institutions, including those concerning developed countries which will serve as a reference of comparison with value-chains in developing countries.

The study will, through the use of case studies from a minimum of eleven selected developing countries and a minimum of two studies from the small-scale sector in developed countries, analyse the factors that determine prices and margins throughout the value-chain as well as the distribution of benefits among the various stakeholders. Aquaculture and inland fisheries will be considered in addition to capture fisheries.  Particular attention will be given to processing in order to compare the difference in value creation from the export of unprocessed and processed fish.

Modalities: FAO and three external experts to implement the project

A group of three international experts and FAO will be crucial in the implementation of the study. The case studies will be carried out by national consultants.

Following are the contact address of the experts involved in the implementation of the project:
 

FAO focal point:

Dr. Audun Lem
Audun.Lem@fao.org

Lead consultant:

Professor Trond Bjorndal
University of Portsmouth
Trond.Bjorndal@port.ac.uk 
 

International consultants:

1. Dr. Madan Dey
University of Arkansas
mdey@uaex.edu

2. Dr. Achini De Silva
Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka
desilva.achini@yahoo.co.uk

International steering committee oversees the project

A steering committee consisting of representatives from international bodies working on fisheries issues monitors progress of the project. The international steering committee is composed of:

 
1. Dr. Blessing Mapfumo
     INFOSA, Namibia
    
blessing@infosa.org.na

2. Dr. Richard Abila
Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute
    
abilarichard@hotmail.com
    
abilarichard@yahoo.com

3. Mr. Sebastian Mathew, International Collective in Support of Fish workers, India
    
sebastian1957@gmail.com

4. Ms. Kirsten Bjoru,
NORAD, Norway
     
Kirsten.Bjoru@norad.no

5. Dr. Audun Lem, FAO
    
Audun.Lem@fao.org

Dissemination of results:

The results of the project report will be disseminated through complementary activities of FAO and presented at FAO conferences such as the COFI Sub-Committee on fish trade. The results will be used in follow-up work at the field-level and included in specific projects benefiting small-scale operators.

Further dissemination will be carried out at the local level in the countries of study. Particular attention will be given to providing feedback to all local informants, interviewees and their communities.

Study to be published in 2011

The results of the study will be presented through various regional and sub-regional workshops and the final report published by the end of 2011.

CASE STUDY COUNTRIES

The project involves case studies of sixteen countries, where five are industrialized and the remaining are developing countries. The industrialized countries include Japan, Canada, Norway, Iceland and Spain. The case study for Iceland and Norway are locally financed.

The developing countries are Honduras and Peru (central and south America); Morocco, Uganda, Kenya and Ghana (Africa); Cambodia, Vietnam, Thailand, Bangladish and The Maldives (Asia).

Following are the relevant species and the name(s) of the consultant(s) for each country:

Industrialised countries

 

Country

Species included

Consultant

Japan

Skipjack tuna, sardine (Japanese pilchard), horse mackerel, Pacific saury, sea bream, common squid

Dr. Nobuyuki Yagi,

The University of Tokyo

yagi@fs.a.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Canada

Lobster, halibut, wild salmon, farmed salmon,
dog fish

Professor D.V. Gordon

University of Calgary

dgordon@ucalgary.ca

Norway

Salted & dried cod, salmon

Dr. Erik Nesset, Aalesund University College

en@hials.no

Iceland

Cod, haddock

Dr. Ögmundur H. Knútsson, University of Akureyri.

ogmundur@unak.is

Spain

Horse mackerel; squid; halibut; salmon; cod; anchovy; hake, octopus; sardine; Nile perch; tuna; shrimp; trout; pangasius

Professor Dr. Jose Manuel Fernandez Polanco

University of  Cantabria

Santander

jm.fernandez@unican.es

Africa

 

Country

Species included

Consultant

Morocco

Anchovy, demersal fish, Hake, octopus, Sardine 

Dr. David Bouras, Lincoln University, USA ‎BourasD@lincolnu.edu

Kenya

Lobster; three species from Lake Victoria:  Nile perch, tilapia, dagaa

Mr. Julius Manyala

manyalajo@yahoo.com

Uganda

Catfish, tilapia, Nile perch, Rasterineobola argentea  (Mukene), Bagrus docmak

Mr. Maurice Ssebisubi, Aquaculture Management Consultants Ltd. mauriceisnot@gmail.com

Ghana

Tuna and Tilapia

Mr. Theodore-Oboo Antwi-Asare, 

University of Ghana

anasare@ug.edu.gh

Central and South America

 

 

Country

Species

Consultant

Honduras

Shrimp, tilapia, spiny lobster

Ms. Claudia Stella Beltrán,

Consultant clabeltu@gmail.com

Peru

Peruvian anchovy,
scallops, shrimp, trout

Dr. Sigbjorn Tveteraas,

Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú

stveteras@gmail.com

Ms Yvonne del Carmen Cruz Castañeda, Consultant

yevans@terra.com.pe

 

Asia

 

Country

Species

Consultant

Cambodia

Pangasius, giant snakehead, sanna, ruddis, crocker

Dr. Hap Navy, Ministry of Fisheries

hap_navy@yahoo.com

Vietnam

Shrimp, catfish, hardclam

Msc. Nguyen Thanh Hai

Vice Director of Vietnam Institute of Fisheries Economics and Planning – 10 Nguyen Cong Hoan, Ba Dinh district, Hanoi, Vietnam

thanhhaithuysan@yahoo.com

haisifep@yahoo.com

Ms. Ngo Thi Thanh Huong

Researcher

Vietnam Institute of Fisheries Economics and Planning

10 Nguyen Cong Hoan, Ba Dinh district, Hanoi, Vietnam

dahuongait9@yahoo.com

Bangladesh

Ruhu, catla, pangas, tilapia, ilish

Dr. Ferdous Alam ‎dr.ferdous@gmail.com

Thailand

Sea bass, goby, grouper, shrimp, tilapia, catfish, tuna

Mrs. Amporn Laowapong,

Department of Fisheries amporn0108@gmail.com

The Maldives

Skipjack tuna

Mr. Sinan Hussain, Ministry of Fisheries

hsinan@gmail.com


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[1] This is a follow-up to a 2004 study on the impact of international fish trade on local food security, published as FAO Fisheries Technical Paper 456

* WITH THE FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF NORAD