Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)
Project meeting, Engaresero Maasai Pastoralist Heritage Area (Tanzania). © FAO/David Boerma.
A cup of tea… or cha?
01 November 2021
Did you know that most of the world uses the same two words for tea? One variation is the one used in English (tea), French (thé), Spanish (té) and Dutch (thee). The other is a variation of chá (in Mandarin and Cantonese), such as chai in Hindi, shay in Arabic and chay in Russian. There’s an interesting reason for this.
©Shizuoka WASABI Association for Important Agricultural Heritage Systems Promotion
With its distinctive green colour and sharp, spicy flavour, wasabi (Eutrema japonicum) has been highly prized in Japan for centuries. There is evidence from written works that Buddhist monks ate “cold wasabi soup” from as early as the 12th century. By the 14th century, they began to eat sashimi topped with wasabi vinegar, and from then on, wasabi started to appear in the meals of the public. Now, it is eaten all...
©FAO
All seems at peace. Just the sound of bleating goats and clanging tin cooking pots ring out over the land as the sun sets between Tanzania’s Lake Natron and the mountain of Ol Doinyo Lengai, meaning ‘Mountain of God’ in the Maasai language. These two powerful symbols of nature make the village of Engaresero spectacularly unique.
The COVID-19 pandemic has hit the tourism sector hard and international travel in particular has suffered a blow, particularly impacting rural people whose livelihoods may rely on foreign visitors. But with every challenge there is an opportunity, and this is one to build tourism back better: more sustainably, more fairly, promoting non-traditional, rural destinations and creating more resilient livelihoods for local communities. One way of doing this is through ‘agritourism’. It...
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