FAO in Tanzania

Project list

Advancing “healthy street food incentives” to boost the safety and nutritional balance of street food in sub-Saharan Africa

Advancing “healthy street food incentives” to boost the safety and nutritional balance of street food in sub-Saharan Africa

Duration November 2017 - October 2019

Project code  TCP/RAF/3611

Objective:

This Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP) aims at making street food in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) safer, more nutritionally balanced, and more profitable, contributing to the health and livelihoods of the population in the region, as well as contributing to the achievement of sustainable development goals. With this aim, the TCP introduce the “Healthy Street Food Incentives”, an integrated, long-term, financially self-sustaining plan, to support Governments in Sub-Saharan Africa in developing the street food sector

Short description:

SFVs have proliferated in the last three and a half decades throughout Africa due to the ongoing urbanization (that is, increased population living in urban areas, and increased size of the cities). On one hand, its sale provides a regular source of income for millions of people (mostly women) with limited access to the formal wage labor market; on the other hand, it represents a significant part of the daily diet for millions of low-and-middle-income urban dwellers who spend long hours out of the house. Despite the nutritional, economic, social, and even cultural importance of street food vendors in Africa, the sector is affected, to varying degrees in each country and urban area, by three specific issues that hinder its development, that is, a) poor food safety; b) nutritional imbalance (since most SFVs tend to sell more meat and starchy food over micronutrient-rich foods such as fruit and vegetable; c) widespread informality of SFVs.  SFV also often operate under unsanitary conditions with little or no infrastructural support and are perceived to be a major public health risk.

The pilot of the plan will be implemented in Accra (Ghana) and Dar es Salaam (Tanzania), In the meantime,

Donor: FAO-TCP

Engaging the Food and Agriculture sectors in Sub-Saharan Africa and South and South-East Asia in the global efforts to combat Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) using One Health Approach or The Fleming Fund Phase Two AMR Project

Engaging the Food and Agriculture sectors in Sub-Saharan Africa and South and South-East Asia in the global efforts to combat Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) using One Health Approach or The Fleming Fund Phase Two AMR Project

Duration: April 2017 - March 2019

Project code: GCP/GLO/710/UK

Objectives:

  • To raise public awareness and understanding of AMR threats.
  • To strengthen laboratory capacities for AMR/Antimicrobial Use (AMU) surveillance and monitoring.
  • To review national regulatory framework in relation to AMU/AMR 
  • To promote good practices  to reduce infection  and prudent use of antimicrobials  through improved farm hygiene, biosecurity and biosafety measures, use of vaccines and other alternatives. 

Short description:

  • Fleming Fund Phase Two AMR project is specifically addressing Antimicrobial Resistance /Antimicrobial Usage in the food and agriculture sectors.
  • All project activities are implemented  using One Health approach and collaboration
  • The project through FAO supports the Government of the URT to implement the Nation Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance (2017-2022) but also supports the development of Antimicrobial Resistance Nation Action Plan for Zanzibar.
  • The main pillars of the project are awareness, evidence, governance and practices that are coherent with World Health Organization/Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)  Global action Plans on Antimicrobial Resistance.
  • Surveillance activities are expected to generate AMR data that will guide clinical treatment options and management of infectious diseases in humans and animal health sectors.

Donor: The UK

Building surveillance and management capacity to effectively respond to fall armyworms (FAW) in Tanzania

Building surveillance and management capacity to effectively respond to fall armyworms (FAW) in Tanzania

Duration: November 2017 - December 2018

Project code: TCP/3508/URT

Objective:

  • Comprehensive, multi sectoral approaches to control, monitor and manage FAW problem and improve the health, food safety, food security, nutrition, income and livelihoods of farm households in Tanzania

Short description

Fall Armyworm (FAW), is native to tropical and subtropical regions of the Americas, with the adult moth able to move over 100 km per night. This new pest in Africa, attacking maize and can also feed on more than 80 crop species such as rice, sorghum, paddy, legumes wheat, sugar cane as well as vegetable crops and cotton.  In Tanzania Maize is major staple food, produced by 4.5 million farm households which representing about 82% of all Tanzanian farmers.

The fall armyworm, which was first arrived in Tanzania March 2017, due to delay in detection of pest and response and low levels of awareness among stakeholders, it has now covered more than 71,426.5 hectares of maize and sorghum (Ministry of Agriculture – MoA Feb 2018, Report). The pest has now spread all over the country and have been reported on more than 10 regions in Tanzania, which are Rukwa, Kagera, Coastal Region, Geita, Simiyu, Kilimanjaro, Njombe, Dodoma, Morogoro, Iringa, Mara, Katavi, Mbeya, Arusha, Mwanza and Songwe. Warm climate is conducive for rapid multiplication of FAW, and in a very near future, the Country could experience a major outbreak.

To avert impending wide spread of FAW outbreaks and subsequent costs related to food insecurity, Upon request from the Government of Tanzania, represented by the Ministry of Agriculture (Mainland), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) provided both financial and  technical assistance for the mentioned Technical Cooperation Project (TCP).

Although FAO FAW index test for level of vulnerability and lack of coping capacity as a function of Government spending on agriculture and infrastructure development, cereals supply level and food prices is medium, about 8,859,652 population are at high risk level of exposure to the FAW hazard. Apart from FAW, the Country is experiencing invasion of other new pests and invasive alien plants such as Striga; stalk borers, white grubs, earworm, weevils, grain borers, quelea quelea birds. The FAW infestation problem is wide spread but no assessment has been done to determine the socioeconomic impact of this pest

Donor: FAO-TCP

Priority area: Strengthening resilience to natural and man-made threats and crises, such as climate change impact; and unsustainable management of natural resources

Improve the competitiveness and increase postharvest value chain of small holder farmers

Improve the competitiveness and increase postharvest value chain of small holder farmers

Duration: July 2017 – June 2020

Project codeGCP/URT/148/EC

Objective: To reduce rural poverty through improved competitiveness of smallholder rice producers in the SAGCOT area

To increase the competitiveness of rice value chain and improve post-harvest management of small holder farmers in Iringa regions.

Short description:

The project is focusing on improving the competitiveness of smallholder farmers in 12 producer organizations. The project is set to deliver the following key results/outcomes:    

  • Result 1 – The managerial capacities of small holder farmers’ cooperative associations strengthened. 
  • Result 2 - Innovative and sustainable market systems and capacities of producers to engage on postharvest processes and market linkage strengthened
  • Result 3 -Postharvest facilities including storage provided, rehabilitated and professional management promoted
  • Result 4 – Coordination, synergies and complementarities with ongoing initiatives enhanced and strengthened

Donor: European Union (EU)

Priority areas:

  • Priority area A: Promoting agriculture as a profitable business
  • Priority Area C: Improving market access for increased incomes

Support Livelihoods Restoration to the Disaster Affected Communities in Kagera Region of Tanzania

Support Livelihoods Restoration to the Disaster Affected Communities in Kagera Region of Tanzania

Duration: February 2017 – January 2019

Project Code: TCP/URT/3606                        

Objective: 

The overall objective of the project is to provide technical support to smallholder producers (farmers, livestock keepers and fisherfolk communities) affected by the 2016 earthquake and prolonged drought disaster in Kagera region, north western Tanzania. The 5.9 Richter scale earthquake struck the region killing 19 people while injuring more than 400 others with 2,072 buildings reduced into rubbles. A total of 14,000 other buildings developed major cracks. The earthquake and prolonged drought compounded the risk of food shortages and seed scarcity.

Short Description:

In response to earthquake which occurred in Kagera Region in September 2016, FAO is supporting smallholder farming communities to increase agricultural productivity and production which in turn will improve household food security and income. Currently, the project is supporting farmers in five councils in terms of capacity building training to farmers and professionals, distribution of improved seeds and planting materials, agricultural equipment, nutrition education and campaign and improved livestock breeds. Capacities of the region and districts to prepare and respond to disasters are also strengthened.

Donor: FAO

Priority areas: Strengthening resilience to natural and man-made threats and crises, such as climate change impacts; and unsustainable management of natural resources

Strengthening Food and Nutrition Security and Decision Making through Support to the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) System

Strengthening Food and Nutrition Security and Decision Making through Support to the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) System

Duration: January – December 2018

Project code: GCP/GLO/691/USA

Objectives: To assess the chronic drivers of food insecurity that contribute to chronic malnutrition in the United Republic of Tanzania and recommend on medium and long term interventions to address food insecurity.

Short Description: The Government of Tanzania in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) through Tanzania Food Security and Nutrition Analysis System — in Kiswahili: “Mfumo wa Uchambuzi wa Uhakika wa Chakula na Lishe (MUCHALI)’ in the Mainland and the Zanzibar Food Security and Nutrition Information and Early Warning System (Zanzibar FSNIEWS) and other Food Security and Nutrition Stakeholders are conducting the food security assessment on the chronic drivers of food insecurity in Tanzania.

This first IPC Chronic Analysis in United Republic of Tanzania commenced in January 2018 and it involves a series of six (6) steps of implementation in a period of eight (8) to twelve (12) months. It is expected that this analysis will be able to articulate issues of concern for medium to long term interventions with regard to food and nutrition security - structural issues. The study is conducted through a joint review of the existing information from accepted sources at national and global levels. 

Donor: The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) 

Priority areas: Evidence – based agriculture policy, planning, investment and sector coordination

Support sustainable value chain development for job creation, food and nutrition security

Support sustainable value chain development for job creation, food and nutrition security

Project code: UNJP/URT/150/UNJ

Duration: January, 2018-June 2021

Short description:

  • Tanzania has sustained relatively high economic growth over the last decade, averaging 6–7% a year. But while its poverty rate has declined, its absolute number of poor has not because of its high population growth rate. The country's overall population is about 55 million (2016).
  • Although Tanzania's poverty rate fell from 60% in 2007 to an estimated 47% in 2016, based on the US$1.90 per day global poverty line, about 12 million Tanzanians still live in extreme poverty on earnings of less than US$0.60 per day. Many others live just above the poverty line and risk falling back into poverty in the event of socio-economic shocks.
  • In support of Government development effort UN agencies has developed the UN Development Assistance Plan (UNDAP) II 2016-2021, through this joint project, the FAO, will provide assistance to the government and other stakeholders to build their capacity to implement inclusive economic growth strategies that accelerate poverty reduction through the promotion of sustainable value chain interventions
  • Focus will be placed on supporting functioning local enterprises, viable and inclusive value chains with potential to generate employment for women, men and young people to ensure their active and meaningful participation in the economic. 
  • The activities of the project are prepared to address the creation of employment, providing healthy and nutritious food and stimulating economic growth. The initiatives will assist the Government of the United Republic of Tanzania in the implementation The Five-Year Development Plan (FYDP 2016-2021-Phase II) is an important framework to guide development plan in the country by reaching Development Vision 2015 and attain SDGs;

Donor: SIDA

Support to the Review of the National Forest Policy

Support to the Review of the National Forest Policy

Duration: January 2017 – March 2018.

Project code: TCP/URT/3603

Objectives: The primary objective of the forest policy review process was to update or improve the current (operational) forest policy. Besides of linking the policy with the current regional environmental initiatives (e.g. Southern African Development Community Protocol on Forestry), the review process puts in consideration the overall perspective of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and targets.

Short description:

The policy review process aimed to provide an opportunity for stakeholders to share their experiences and to put in place the operational framework of their involvement in the process. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) supported the entire process, including the recruitment of consultants to conduct the policy review and three special studies on community-based forestry, forest tenure, and forestry and food security, respectively. Recommendations from these studies contributed to the development of new provisions in the draft policy. In addition, the project supported a multi-stakeholder task force mandated to provide guidance to the consultants and assisted in the conduct of consultations to collect stakeholder inputs and views. As a result of project activities, the country developed a draft National Forest Policy and an improved forest policies framework, providing an enabling environment and guidance for country-driven forest sector development.

Donor: FAO

Priority area: Strengthening resilience to natural and man-made threats and crises, such as climate change impacts; and unsustainable management of natural resources

Supporting the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) to Address Zoonotic Diseases and Animal Health in Africa

Supporting the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) to Address Zoonotic Diseases and Animal Health in Africa

Project code: OSRO/GLO/507/USA

Duration: 01 October 2015 – 30 September 2019

OBJECTIVES:

  • Improve adoption of measured behaviours, policies and/or practices that minimize the transmission of zoonotic diseases from animals into human populations.
  • Strengthen existing surveillance systems for prioritized zoonoses of greatest national concern.
  • Improve the national biosafety and biosecurity system, ensuring that especially dangerous pathogens are identified, held, secured and monitored in a minimal number of facilities according to best practices.
  • Strengthen real-time bio-surveillance and laboratory-based diagnostics.
  • Contribute to increased availability of skilled and competent health personnel for sustainable and functional public health surveillance and response at all levels of the health system and the effective implementation of the International Health Regulations (IHR), 2005.

Donor: United States Agency for International Development (USAID)

Priority Area: Strengthening resilience to natural and man-made threats and crises, such as climate change impacts; and unsustainable management of natural resources

UN Joint Programme to Support Sustainable Agriculture Value Chain Development in Tanzania

UN Joint Programme to Support Sustainable Agriculture Value Chain Development in Tanzania

Project code: UNJP/URT/150/UNJ

Duration: 02 April 2018 - 30 June 2021

Objective: The main objective of the UN Joint Programme to Support Sustainable Agriculture Value Chain Development in Tanzania (Kigoma Joint Programme- Focus on Food and Economic Security through Agriculture) project is to increase the income of smallholder farmers in the region by offering a value chain centric approach which will increase the investment in agriculture, while lowering the risk of investments and increasing the private sector engagement.

Short description:

Output 1: Organizational and practical capacities of smallholder producers strengthened for increased production, post- harvest handling and nutrition

Activities:

  • Strengthening group cohesion and building producer organizations through Farmer Field Schools (FFS) and Junior Farmer Field Learning Schools (JFFLS)
  • Training on good agriculture and Climate Smart Agriculture practices for selected commodities with special focus on maize and cassava crops such as/on  good hygiene practices, integrated pest management, value addition, food preservation technologies and market access
  • Procurement and distribution of agricultural inputs
  • Promote growing of a variety of maize and cassava crops through various channels including community radios and school programmes
  • Promote and train beekeeping as a viable enterprise including dissemination of information via community radio.

Output 2: Increased resilience of smallholder farmers to climate shocks and adoption of ecosystems based adaptation strategies

Activity:

  • Develop and implement integrated landscape management plans in the project area/ agricultural zone

Donor: Government of Norway

Partners: Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries, Kigoma and Local Government Authorities in Kasulu, Kibondo and Kakonko and Uvinza districts

UN Agencies:  WFP, ITC, UNCDF

CSO/NGOs: selected locally based organizations

Priority areas:

Priority Area B: Increasing agricultural production, productivity for food and nutrition security.

Priority Area D: Strengthening resilience to natural and man-made threats and crises, such as climate change impacts; and unstainable management of natural resources