APFIC REGIONAL CONSULTATIVE WORKSHOP

APFIC REGIONAL CONSULTATIVE WORKSHOP

RAP PUBLICATION 2007/18

APFIC REGIONAL CONSULTATIVE WORKSHOP

MANAGING FISHING CAPACITY AND ILLEGAL, UNREPORTED AND UNREGULATED FISHING IN ASIA

Phuket, Thailand, 13–15 June 2007

 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
REGIONAL OFFICE FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
Bangkok, 2007

The designation and presentation of material in this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers and boundaries.

© FAO 2007

NOTICE OF COPYRIGHT

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For copies write to:   

The Senior Fishery Officer
FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific
Maliwan Mansion, 39 Phra Athit Road
Bangkok 10200
THAILAND
Tel: (+66) 2 697 4000
Fax: (+66) 2 697 4445
E-mail: FAO-RAP@fao.org

 

FOREWORD

This workshop was held to meet the recommendation of the 29th Session of the Asia-Pacific Fishery Commission (APFIC) to assist member countries improve the management of their fishing capacity in the region, including combating illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing. The overall aim of the workshop was to raise awareness of and promote actions towards achieving one of the most fundamental tenets of fishing – ensuring that fishing efforts are commensurate with the productive capacity of the fishery resource and their sustainable utilization (FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries).

At the global level, the call for States to reduce fishing capacity and combat IUU fishing is very loud and clear. Many reports have argued that existing global capacity is far greater than what is necessary to sustainably harvest the world’s fishery resources. This has been manifested through FAO members drafting and agreeing on an International Plan of Actions for the Management of Fishing Capacity and to Prevent, Deter and Eliminate Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing.

With a few exceptions, however, the responses at the national level have been much weaker, especially in Asian countries. One major dilemma is that if we limit access to fisheries resources we run the risk of cutting off an important source of livelihoods for poor communities, while if we keep the commons open, the resources will sooner or later be fished down (also impacting very negatively on poor communities in the longer term). Most fisheries in the region, therefore, are still open access in nature implying that capacity is not being managed and IUU fishing is still rampant, with most countries stating that they do not have the resources or capacity to do anything about it.

Through this workshop it is hoped that a collective commitment and initiative to assist countries improve their management of fishing capacity and IUU fishing can be made, and that the agreed "call for action" be implemented.

                   
He Changchui                            
Assistant Director-General and            
Regional Representative for Asia and the Pacific

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

WORKSHOP CONCLUSIONS AND CALL FOR ACTION

STRATEGIES FOR IMPLEMENTATION

OPENING OF THE WORKSHOP

INTRODUCTION TO THE WORKSHOP

Workshop objectives and modus operandi
Overview of fishing capacity and IUU fishing in Asia

THEME I: NEED FOR CAPACITY REDUCTION AND CONTROL OF IUU FISHING

Scientific evidence on the status of resources
What the fishers are saying
Socio-economic indicators of overcapacity
Costs/benefits of capacity management
Social implications of capacity reduction: Small-scale fisheries perspective

THEME II: CURRENT STATUS IN CAPACITY REDUCTION AND CONTROL OF IUU FISHING

Australia
Bangladesh
Cambodia
China
India
Indonesia
Malaysia
Myanmar
Pakistan
Philippines
Sri Lanka
Thailand
Viet Nam

THEME III: CAPACITY REDUCTION TOOLS AND ACTIONS

Partner Programs on capacity reduction and IUU fishing
Global setting – IPOAs and the benefits/costs of managing capacity and IUU fishing
Capacity management: actual tools – what works and what doesn’t
Combating IUU fishing – what works and what doesn’t
Progress in managing fishing capacity and IUU fishing – implementation of the FAO Code of Conduct in APFIC countries

THEME IV: LOCAL, COUNTRY AND REGIONAL ACTIONS

Working Groups
Working Group 1 – Capacity Management
Working Group 2 – IUU fishing
Working Group 3 – Information needs

WORKSHOP RECOMMENDATIONS AND ACTIONS

WORKSHOP CLOSURE

ANNEX I Agenda
ANNEX IIA Welcome Remarks
ANNEX IIB Opening Statement of APFIC Chair
ANNEX IIC Opening statement of APFIC Secretary
ANNEX III List of participants
ANNEX IV Management tool box
ANNEX V Regional Plan of Action
ANNEX VIA Priority actions and implementation strategies – Management Fishing Capacity
ANNEX VIB Priority actions and implementation strategies – IUU Fishing
ANNEX VIC Priority actions and implementation strategies – Information Needs