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REPORT of the

TWENTY-FIRST SESSION OF THE

EUROPEAN INLAND FISHERIES ADVISORY COMMISSION

Budapest, Hungary, 1-7 June 2000

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
Rome, 2000

PREPARATION OF THIS DOCUMENT

The present text is the final version of the report adopted on 7 June 2000 by the participants in the Twenty-first Session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission.

Distribution:
Participants
EIFAC Member States
European Community
EIFAC Mailing List
FAO Fisheries Department
FAO Regional Fisheries Officers

FAO.
Report of the twenty-first session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission. Budapest, Hungary, 1-7 June 2000.
FAO Fisheries Report. No. 625. Rome, FAO. 2000. 33 p.

SUMMARY

The Twenty-first Session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission (EIFAC) was held in Budapest, Hungary, from 1 to 7 June 2000, in concomitance with a Symposium on Fisheries and Society. The session reviewed EIFAC’s activities since 1998 in the fields of fishery biology and management, aquaculture, protection of the aquatic resource, and social and economic issues. EIFAC revised and decided its future programme of work, and in particular the activities which should be carried out until the next session of the Commission in 2002, planned to be held in the United Kingdom and preceded by a Symposium on Inland Fisheries Management and the Aquatic Environment.

CONTENTS

DECISIONS, DIRECTIVES AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE TWENTY-FIRST SESSION OF EIFAC

OFFICERS OF EIFAC AND CONVENERS OF AD HOC WORKING PARTIES

I. OPENING OF THE SESSION

II. ADOPTION OF THE AGENDA

III. SYMPOSIUM ON FISHERIES AND SOCIETY

IV. BIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (Sub-Commission I)

Fishing Gear Selectivity

Eels

Electric Fishing

Introductions and Stocking

Synopsis on Alosa alosa and Alosa fallax

Mapping Fish Distribution and Aquatic Habitat Quality

Election of Officers

V. AQUACULTURE (Sub-Commission II)

Fish Diseases and their Control

Aquatic Resources Management in Aquaculture

Fish and Crustacean Nutrition

Other Activities

Other Matters

Election of Officers

VI. PROTECTION OF THE AQUATIC RESOURCE (Sub-Commission III)

Accumulated Toxicants in Fish

Effects of Physical Modifications of the Aquatic Habitat on Fish Populations

Methodologies for Rehabilitation of Lakes and Reservoirs

Prevention and Control of Bird Predation

Influence of Management Practices on the Environment

Evaluation of Ecological and Human Health Effects from Endocrine Disrupting Substances

Election of Officers

VII. SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC ISSUES (Sub-Commission IV)

Communication and Education

Recreational Fisheries

Resolution of Conflicts in River Basins

Socio-economic Aspects of Inland Fisheries

Election of Officers

VIII. ADOPTION OF THE REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE SUB-COMMISSIONS

IX. ADOPTION OF THE REPORT OF THE SYMPOSIUM

X. SYMPOSIUM IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE TWENTY-SECOND SESSION OF EIFAC

XI. STRENGTHENING OF EIFAC

Communications

Duration of the Session

XII. ANY OTHER MATTERS

Publication of Symposia Proceedings

Collaboration with other Organizations

XIII. ELECTION OF EIFAC OFFICERS

XIV. DATE AND PLACE OF THE TWENTY-SECOND SESSION OF EIFAC

XV. ADOPTION OF THE REPORT AND CLOSING OF THE SESSION

Appendix A

Agenda

Appendix B

List of Documents

Appendix C

List of Participants

Appendix D

Opening Addresses

Appendix E

Summary Report of the Symposium on Fisheries and Society

Appendix F

Prospectus of the EIFAC Symposium on Inland Fisheries Management and the Aquatic Environment

DECISIONS, DIRECTIVES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
OF THE TWENTY-FIRST SESSION OF EIFAC

 New Title, Working Party on Fish Monitoring in Fresh Waters

Election of Officers for Sub-Commission I

Convener, Working Party on Aquatic Resources Management in Aquaculture

Creation of Working Party on Organic Fish Farming

Election of Officers of Sub-Commission II

Cancellation of Working Party on Accumulated Toxicants in Fish

Convener, Working Party on Effects of Physical Modifications of the Aquatic Habitat on Fish Populations

Support to internationally coordinated activities on effects of fish-eating birds

Election of officers of Sub-Commission III

Convener, Working Party on Recreational Fisheries

Convener, Working Party on Socio-economic Aspects of Inland Fisheries

Election of officers of Sub-Commission IV

Recommendations from Symposium on Fisheries and Society

Establishment of EIFAC/EC Working Party on Market Perspectives of European Freshwater Aquaculture

Recommendation to hold Symposium on Inland Fisheries Management and the Aquatic Environment

Duration of future Sessions

Election of officers of EIFAC

Date and place of Twenty-second Session

Adoption of the Report

OFFICERS OF EIFAC AND CONVENERS OF AD HOC WORKING PARTIES

 

Chairperson:

R. Müller

 

First Vice-Chairperson:

K. Pintér

 

Second Vice-Chairperson:

M. Bninska

 

Secretary:

H. Naeve

SUB-COMMISSION I – BIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

 

Chairperson:

T. Brenner

 

Vice-Chairperson:

P. Fitzmaurice

 

Rapporteur:

K. Hensel

 

Technical Secretary:

G. Marmulla

ad hoc Working Parties

Eels

Convener

W. Dekker

Fish monitoring in fresh waters

Convener

P. Hickley

Introductions and stocking

Convener

I. Cowx

Mapping of fish distribution and aquatic habitat quality

Convener

A. Lelek

SUB-COMMISSION II – AQUACULTURE

 

Chairperson:

L. Váradi

 

Vice-Chairperson:

Y. Avnimelech

 

Rapporteur:

J.-P. Proteau

 

Technical Secretary:

U. Barg

ad hoc Working Parties

Fish diseases and their control

Convener

R. Richards

Aquatic resources management in aquaculture

Convener

Y. Avnimelech

Fish and crustacean nutrition

Convener

I. Csengeri

Organic fish farming

Convener

V. Hilge

Market perspectives of European freshwater aquaculture (jointly with European Community)

Convener

L. Váradi

SUB-COMMISSION III – PROTECTION OF THE AQUATIC RESOURCE

 

Chairperson:

L. Raat

 

Vice-Chairperson:

D. Gerdeaux

 

Rapporteur:

P. Gérard

 

Technical Secretary:

H. Naeve

ad hoc Working Parties

Effects of physical modification of the aquatic habitat on fish populations

Convener

M. Zalewski

Methodologies for rehabilitation of lakes and reservoirs

Convener

H. Lehtonen

Prevention and control of bird predation

Convener

E. Staub

Influence of management practices on the environment

Convener

M. Aprahamian

Evaluation of ecological and human health effects from endocrine disrupting substances (jointly with GESAMP)

Coordinat.

P.-D. Hansen

SUB-COMMISSION IV – SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC ISSUES

 

Chairperson:

I. Cowx

 

Vice-Chairperson:

R. Marini

 

Rapporteur:

M.J. Collares-Pereira

 

Technical Secretary:

D. Greboval

ad hoc Working Parties

Communication and education

Convener

T. Brenner

Recreational fisheries

Convener

B. Breton

Socio-economic aspects of inland fisheries

Convener

M. Sipponen

I. OPENING OF THE SESSION

1. The Twenty-first Session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission (EIFAC) was held in Budapest, Hungary, from 1 to 7 June 2000 under the Chairpersonship of Mr Christopher Moriarty (Ireland). The Session was attended by 45 representatives from 22 members of the Commission. The List of Participants is given as Appendix C to this report.

2. The Session was opened by the Deputy State Secretary of the Hungarian Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, Mr Imre Mucsi, who described the inland fisheries situation in Hungary as an example of general importance of inland water fisheries.

3. The FAO Sub–Regional Representative for Europe, Mr Jaroslav Suchman, welcomed the participants in the name of the Director-General of FAO, Mr Jacques Diouf. He underlined the role of EIFAC as a forum for interchange of information and a mechanism for ensuring a common approach to inland fisheries throughout Europe.

4. The Chairperson of the Commission, Mr C. Moriarty, noted with appreciation that this was the second time that Hungary had hosted EIFAC and acknowledged the leading role of the host country in many aspects of inland fisheries in Europe. He observed that the Commission is still growing and with the recent addition of Iceland and Latvia has now reached 34 members. He also emphasized that, despite the increasing need for collaborative activities under the Commission, the programme has been streamlined to correspond to current trends in financing and manpower.

II. ADOPTION OF THE AGENDA

5. The Agenda which appears as Appendix A was adopted. The documents which were before the Commission are listed in Appendix B.

III. SYMPOSIUM ON FISHERIES AND SOCIETY

6. A Symposium on Fisheries and Society was organized in conjunction with the Twenty-first Session of EIFAC in Budapest, Hungary, from 1 to 3 June 2000. The Symposium was convened by Mr M. Sipponen (Finland) and chaired by Mr K. Pintér (Hungary). The Symposium was attended by 99 participants from 27 countries. The main documentation comprised 35 experience papers and 15 posters. The summary report of the Symposium is Appendix E to this report.

IV. BIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (Sub-Commission I)

7. The Chairperson of the Sub-Commission Mr T. Brenner (Germany) informed the Session of progress achieved in the activities agreed during the Twentieth Session of the Commission. The report of the activities was submitted to the Session as document EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.5.

Fishing Gear Selectivity

8. With the exception of the finalization of the manuscript on gillnetting for roach, work on this topic has been discontinued as agreed at the Twentieth Session of EIFAC. The manuscript has been finalized but must be shortened in accordance with the reviewers’ comments in order to be published. It is expected that the publication will then be available in early 2001.

Eels

9. The Joint EIFAC/ICES Working Party on Eels met in Silkeborg, Denmark in September 1999. This meeting found that eel fisheries throughout Europe are in decline and that recruitment of glass eels from the ocean remains at a very low level. The report of the meeting has been issued by ICES as ICES CM 2000/ACFM:6. It was decided that the EIFAC Secretariat should contact the ICES Secretariat to clarify the possibilities of jointly publishing the report by EIFAC and ICES.

10. The Convener expressed concern about the status of the Working Group. It was therefore recommended that the Chairperson of EIFAC should contact the Secretariat of ICES to ensure that this important Working Party continues as a joint venture.

11. Upon proposal by the delegation of Poland, the Session took note of the emerging problems with the European eel trade, which are mainly caused by overexploitation of the resource and the export of glass eel to Asia for aquacultural purposes. In addition, glass eel is canned for human consumption in substantial quantities. This has had negative effects on the European eel population and has led to a decline in catches. It was recommended that the issue of glass eel trade be brought to the attention of the Sub-Committee on Fish Trade of the FAO Committee on Fisheries (COFI).

Electric Fishing

12. Members of this Working Party contributed to the European Committee for Standardisation Workshop on fish monitoring organized by CEN/TC230/WG2/TG4 in Alvkarleby, Sweden, from 16 to 18 September 1998. On the basis of the increased emphasis on fish monitoring within the European Community arising from its Water Framework Directive, it was felt important that EIFAC experts also contribute to this activity. It was therefore agreed that the scope of the EIFAC Ad hoc Working Party be widened to include the selection of fish sampling methods and sampling of fish with gillnets and that it be renamed Ad hoc Working Party on Fish Monitoring in Fresh Waters. Mr P. Hickley was elected Convener of the renamed Working Party. The outgoing Convener Mr I. Cowx was thanked for his efficient work.

Introductions and Stocking

13. Members of this Working Party contributed toward the "European Union Analysis of the Environmental and Economic Impact of Operations to Reinforce the Aquatic Fauna of Freshwaters for Fishery Purposes". It was recommended that the EIFAC correspondents contact the relevant national experts to ask for further inputs to fill the remaining gaps.

Synopsis on Alosa alosa and Alosa fallax

14. The draft of the synopsis is almost ready although minor editorial changes still have to be incorporated. The draft synopsis was made available at the Session. Mr Cowx agreed to seek a publisher. The meeting was furthermore informed that the section on literature references is also available in electronic format.

Mapping Fish Distribution and Aquatic Habitat Quality

15. No progress has been made in this activity due to lack of funding and institutional support. It is, however, expected that support can be found during this year and that work can then be started without further delay.

Election of Officers

16. The Chairperson Mr T. Brenner (Germany) was re-elected. Mr P. Fitzmaurice (Ireland) was elected Vice-Chairperson. Mr K. Hensel (Slovakia) was re-elected as Rapporteur.

17. Mr R. Marini (Italy) had expressed his wish to discontinue as Vice-Chairperson of this Sub-Commission. The Sub-Commission thanked him for his contribution to its work.

V. AQUACULTURE (Sub-Commission II)

18. The Chairperson of the Sub-Commission, Mr L. Váradi (Hungary) reported on the activities and achievements of the Sub-Commission. The report of the activities was submitted to the Session as document EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.6.

Fish Diseases and their Control

19. A joint EIFAC/European Association of Fish Pathologists (EAFP) Workshop on Health Management in Sturgeon and Carp Aquaculture and Fisheries was held in Rhodes, Greece, on 19 September 1999, in conjunction with the EAFP International Conference on Fish and Shellfish Diseases. The Workshop focused primarily on sturgeon, and formulated a set of recommendations. The summary report of the Workshop is currently being finalized. It will be distributed to interested experts and will also be made available on the EIFAC Home Page. The Ad hoc Working Party will continue its cooperation with the European Association of Fish Pathologists. A follow-up meeting is being planned for September 2001 to be held in Dublin on the occasion of the Tenth International Conference of EAFP.

Aquatic Resources Management in Aquaculture

20. The Convener of the Working Party, Mr H. Ackefors (Sweden), compiled a study report on Aquatic Resources Management on the basis of replies from eleven countries to a questionnaire sent to all EIFAC National Correspondents. The report was submitted to the Commission as document EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.11.

21. The significant work involved with this study report and the efforts by the Convener were recognized. It was felt that while the study report contained significant information, there may be need to update certain parts of it. It was noted that the Convener had indicated that he would like to retire and reduce a number of commitments. The Session felt that the work should continue, and recommended that Mr Yoram Avnimelech (Israel) be contacted to invite him to take the role as Convener of this Working Party. The Sub-Commission’s Chairperson and the Secretariat will consult with Mr Avnimelech and inform members accordingly. The present study report will be distributed to interested experts, and will also be made available on the EIFAC Home Page.

Fish and Crustacean Nutrition

22. The Convener of the Working Party reported that the proceedings of the EIFAC Workshop on Fish and Crustacean Nutrition Methodology and Research for Semi-Intensive Pond-based Farm Systems (Szarvas, Hungary, 3-5 April 1996) have been edited for publication in the yearbook series of the Fish Culture Research Institute, Szarvas, Hungary. A sufficient number of copies will be made available to the EIFAC Secretariat for distribution to authors and EIFAC Officers. The Working Party will continue its work with special emphasis on fish nutrition, flesh quality and nutrient loadings.

Other Activities

23. The Chairperson of the Sub-Commission, Mr L. Váradi (Hungary), represented EIFAC at the following meetings: Fifteenth Annual Meeting of European Senior Fisheries Cooperation Advisers (Bremen, Germany, 17-18 June 1999); Conference on Aquaculture Economics and Marketing (Debrecen, Hungary, 30 August-1 September 1999); FEAP Presidents Meeting (Thessaloniki, Greece, 25 September 1999; Third Thematic Conference on the Future of Aquaculture in Europe (Santiago de Compostela, Spain, 5-6 November 1999).

24. It was recognized that the aquaculture sector continues to grow in importance, globally as well as in Europe. Significant opportunities exist to strengthen regional and inter-regional co-operation on various aspects of aquaculture development, including marketing, producer organizations, information management and coordination of aquaculture related activities. Reference was made to the AQUAFLOW project, to ongoing cooperation with the Federation of European Aquaculture Producers (FEAP) and the requirements of continued support to existing aquaculture development efforts in Central and Eastern Europe.

25. The representative of the European Commission, Mr C. Vamvakas, emphasized the Commission’s interest in EIFAC’s work. He commended the excellent work carried out by the Chairperson and members of Sub-Commission II. Referring to aquaculture, he would welcome initiatives leading to improved coordination of activities, avoidance of duplication of effort, exchange of information and strengthening of existing networks and initiatives. The Session agreed that efforts be supported which would lead to improved information management, enhanced networking and coordination of aquaculture-related activities, which would also improve the use of available financial resources. Mr Váradi indicated his Institute’s preparedness to continue working on information related to aquaculture in Central and Eastern Europe.

Other Matters

26. The Commission established a new Ad hoc Working Party on Organic Fish Farming. The terms of reference for this Working Party are to:

27. Mr V. Hilge (Germany) accepted to act as the Convener of this Working Party.

Election of Officers

28. The Chairperson Mr Váradi (Hungary), Vice-Chairperson Mr Avnimelech (Israel) and Rapporteur Mr J.-P. Proteau (France) were re-elected.

VI. PROTECTION OF THE AQUATIC RESOURCE (Sub-Commission III)

29. The Chairperson of Sub-Commission III, Mr R. Müller (Switzerland) summarized the activities of the Sub-Commission, which were presented to the Session as document EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.7.

Accumulated Toxicants in Fish

30. In view of the heavy workload of the Convener, Ms Z. Svobodovà (Czech Republic), and considering that work on the problem of toxicant accumulation in fish is being carried out by numerous institutions throughout Europe, it was decided to discontinue this activity. Mr Müller will inform Ms Svobodovà of the outcome and thank her for her long-time involvement.

Effects of Physical Modifications of the Aquatic Habitat on Fish Populations

31. Following the publication of the manual on river rehabilitation in 1998 there has been little activity. Due to heavy workload, Mr J. Coeck (Belgium) regretfully resigned as Convener while still remaining a member of the Working Party. There are two institutions presently dealing with river restoration in Europe (River Restoration Centres in Denmark and the UK), as well as the UNESCO Programme on Eco-hydrology convened by Mr M. Zalewski (Poland). It was proposed that Mr Zalewski be approached by Ms M. Bninska (Poland) to see whether he would be prepared to coordinate work in this field.

Methodologies for Rehabilitation of Lakes and Reservoirs

32. An ad hoc meeting was held during the Twenty-first Session to review the structure and content of the proposed manual on Rehabilitation of Lakes and Reservoirs. The list of chapters, which had been agreed upon in 1998 was modified and expanded to comprise 14 chapters, covering all relevant aspects of lake and reservoir rehabilitation. Six chapters have been completed, and outlines for most of the remaining chapters have been received. The remaining chapters are to be sent to the Convener, Mr H. Lehtonen (Finland), by the end of November 2000. Mr I. Cowx (UK) has kindly agreed to edit the manuscripts to standardize format.

Prevention and Control of Bird Predation

33. The Working Party met during the Session to complete the list of recent literature on cormorant and fish, compiled by the Convener, Mr E. Staub (Switzerland). It further identified the need to compare and clarify the actual legal status of cormorants in European countries.

34. No activity has been noted at the level of the European Cormorant Management Plan. In order to further the basic ideas of the Cormorant Management Plan established under the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS), a research project "Reducing the conflicts between cormorants and fisheries on a pan-European scale (REDCAFE)" was elaborated by a number of institutions and submitted to the European Commission in October 1999. EU funding was approved in April 2000. The project will last two years.

35. The Working Party noted that there is a potentially serious situation resulting from the pan-European increase in numbers of cormorants. These are impacting upon aquaculture, fish stocks and the fishery management of inland waters. It therefore recommends that EIFAC members:

36. It further recommends that:

Influence of Management Practices on the Environment

37. There has been little progress with this Working Party despite the Convener’s efforts to recruit members and to initiate a programme. Only two persons have indicated their willingness to participate. The Convener, Mr M. Aprahamian (UK), agreed to carry on work by putting together a framework and to develop a specific work programme. Each member of the Working Party will then develop a particular topic that the Convener will synthesize into a final report for the next Session of EIFAC.

Evaluation of Ecological and Human Health Effects from Endocrine Disrupting Substances

38. The proposed meeting of the joint GESAMP/EIFAC Working Group was not held due to the failure of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to secure funding. In view of the extensive activity taking place on this subject in Europe, it was considered necessary that the Convener, Mr P.-D. Hansen (Germany) continue the work and report to the next EIFAC Session. Material and literature reviews already prepared by GESAMP will be made available to the Convener.

Election of Officers

39. The following officers were elected: Mr L. Raat (the Netherlands), Chairperson; Mr D. Gerdeaux (France), Vice-Chairperson; Mr P. Gérard (Belgium), Rapporteur.

VII. SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC ISSUES (Sub-Commission IV)

40. The Chairperson of the Sub-Commission Mr I. Cowx (UK), assisted by Ms M.J. Collares-Pereira (Portugal), Rapporteur, informed the Session of the progress achieved during the intersessional period. His report was available to the Session as document EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.8.

Communication and Education

41. This Working Party failed to meet during the intersession. In the meantime the Convener, Mr T. Brenner (Germany), informed the Session that he had started to collate the education strategies linked to inland fisheries in EIFAC member countries. It was suggested that a questionnaire be prepared and sent out to EIFAC correspondents. Mr W.J.M. Muyres (the Netherlands) offered support for this activity. The Working Party can then be convened to discuss information resulting from the questionnaires.

Recreational Fisheries

42. Information has been gathered from countries, both inside and outside the EIFAC region, on a Code of Practice for Recreational Fishing. Although many countries have codes of practice already in existence they are of varying quality and scope according to target audience. Some, however, can serve as a template for the proposed EIFAC publication. Particularly suitable for the purpose is the relatively recent Australian National Code of Practice for Recreational and Sport Fishing. Using this and similar codes as a guide, the framework for the EIFAC Code will be formulated and agreed in the intersessional period.

43. Many papers presented at the Symposium on Fisheries and Society held in conjunction with the Twenty-first Session of EIFAC dealt with recreational fisheries in different member countries. It was recommended that a simple questionnaire be prepared to collate the information to support the millennium statement on recreational fisheries in the region.

44. The Convener, Mr P. Hickley (UK) resigned but offered the services of colleagues in the UK to support future work of the group. Mr B. Bengtsson (Sweden) also expressed a wish to be a member of the Working Party. Mr B. Breton (France) was elected as Convener of the Ad hoc Working Party.

Resolution of Conflicts in River Basins

45. This issue was discussed at the University of Hull International Fisheries Institute (HIFI)/EIFAC Symposium on River Fisheries, (Hull, UK, 1998). The full text of the contributions to this is now available in "Management and Ecology of River Fisheries" edited by I.G. Cowx, published in 2000 by "Fishing News Books", Blackwell Science, Oxford (444p.).

Socio-economic Aspects of Inland Fisheries

46. The Ad hoc Working Party on Socio-economic Aspects of Inland Fisheries failed to meet in the intersessional period. However, this topic formed the subject of the Symposium on Fisheries and Society held as part of this Session. Its summary conclusions and recommendations are presented in paragraph 51 of this report.

47. One aspect that was partially covered by the Symposium was the economic valuation of inland fisheries. It was suggested by Ms E. Roth (Denmark) that a workshop on survey techniques for standardizing the collection of economic data for fisheries management be organized to consolidate on this progress.

48. The Convener of the Ad hoc Working Party, Mr A. Neiland (UK), was unable to continue due to other commitments and Mr M. Sipponen (Finland) was elected as the Convener.

Election of Officers

49. The following persons were elected: Mr I. Cowx (UK), Chairperson; Mr R. Marini (Italy), Vice-Chairperson; Ms M.J. Collares-Pereira (Portugal), Rapporteur.

VIII. ADOPTION OF THE REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE SUB-COMMISSIONS

50. The Commission adopted the reports of the Sub-Commissions.

IX. ADOPTION OF THE REPORT OF THE SYMPOSIUM

51. The Commission adopted the report of the Symposium on Fisheries and Society as summarized in Appendix E. The major recommendations were:

X. SYMPOSIUM IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE TWENTY-SECOND SESSION OF EIFAC

52. Two topics were proposed for the Symposium to be held in association with the Twenty-second Session of EIFAC: (a) European Aquaculture in Freshwater: its place and its future in the globalization of markets for fish products, and (b) Inland Fisheries Management and the Aquatic Environment.

53. The Commission recognized that the first of these proposals was urgent and needed more detailed treatment than could be met by the Symposium associated with regular EIFAC Sessions. It therefore recommended that a meeting on "European Aquaculture in Freshwater: its place and its future in the globalization of markets for fish products" be held without delay and report to Sub-Commission II. The European Community and the EIFAC Secretariat were charged with the organization of the meeting1.

54. "Inland Fisheries Management and the Aquatic Environment" was retained as the topic for the Symposium to be held in conjunction with the Twenty-second Session of EIFAC. Mr D. Gerdeaux (France) accepted to serve as Convener for the Symposium. Mr Cowx (UK) was proposed as Chairperson of the Symposium. The outline of the Symposium Prospectus is included as Appendix F.

XI. STRENGTHENING OF EIFAC

Communications

55. The Secretary requested all members to report changes to mailing, fax and e-mail lists. Wider use can be made of e-mail by setting up topic-oriented lists. This would substitute the directory of expertise which the Secretariat had unsuccessfully attempted to prepare in the past.

56. In view of advances in electronic communication, it was agreed that the EIFAC Newsletter be discontinued in its paper form.

57. Members were encouraged to make maximum use of the EIFAC leaflet prepared by the Secretariat by distributing it widely in their respective countries.

Duration of the Session

58. Delegates felt that the limitation of the Session and Symposium to five days in accordance with the decision of the Twentieth Session of EIFAC did not leave enough time for the Commission to fully transact its business. It was therefore decided that future Sessions be extended to six days with three days allowed for the Symposium. Better use should also be made of the time available through more efficient programming of business. The Executive Committee was invited to address this issue at its next Session.

XII. ANY OTHER MATTERS

Publication of Symposia Proceedings

59. The Session noted with appreciation that selected papers presented at the Symposium in connection with the Twentieth Session were published as a special volume of "Fisheries Management and Ecology".

60. Efforts will be made for similar arrangements for the Proceedings of the Symposium of this Session.

Collaboration with other Organizations

61. Upon the retirement of Mr P. Tuunainen (Finland), Mr G. Rasmussen (Denmark) agreed to represent EIFAC at the ICES Statutory Meeting.

XIII. ELECTION OF EIFAC OFFICERS

62. The following were elected as Officers of the Commission: Mr R. Müller (Switzerland), Chairperson; Mr K. Pintér (Hungary), First Vice-Chairperson; Ms M. Bninska (Poland), Second Vice-Chairperson.

XIV. DATE AND PLACE OF THE TWENTY-SECOND SESSION OF EIFAC

63. The delegate of the United Kingdom declared that it was the intention of the UK to invite the Commission to hold its Twenty-second Session and Symposium in Windermere, subject to approval of funding. The delegates requested that the Session be held in the second half of June 2002.

XV. ADOPTION OF THE REPORT AND CLOSING OF THE SESSION

64. The Report of the Twenty-first Session of EIFAC was adopted on 7 June 2000.

65. The Chairperson of EIFAC, Mr C. Moriarty, thanked the Government of Hungary and their staff for the excellent way in which the Session was organized and serviced. He closed the Session at 17.00 hours on 7 June 2000.

Appendix A
AGENDA

1.

Opening of the Session

2.

Adoption of the Agenda

3.

Symposium on Fisheries and Society

4.

Sub-Commission I

Review of intersessional activities:

  • Eels
  • Electric fishing
  • Introductions and stocking
  • Mapping of fish distribution and aquatic habitat quality

Programme of the Sub-Commission

Other matters

Election of Officers

5.

Sub-Commission II

Review of intersessional activities:

  • Fish diseases and their control
  • Aquatic resources management in aquaculture
  • Fish and crustacean nutrition

Programme of the Sub-Commission

Other matters

Election of Officers

6.

Sub-Commission III

Review of intersessional activities:

  • Accumulated toxicants in fish
  • Effects of physical modifications of the aquatic habitat on fish populations
  • Methodologies for rehabilitation of lakes and reservoirs
  • Prevention and control of bird predation
  • Influence of management practices on the environment
  • Evaluation of ecological and human health effects from endocrine disrupting substances

Programme of the Sub-Commission

Other matters

Election of Officers

7.

Sub-Commission IV

Review of intersessional activities:

  • Communication and education
  • Recreational fisheries
  • Social and economic aspects of inland fisheries

Programme of the Sub-Commission

Other matters

Election of Officers

8.

Adoption of the reports and recommendations from the Sub-Commissions

9.

Adoption of the Report of the Symposium

10.

Symposium in conjunction with the Twenty-second Session of EIFAC

11.

Strengthening of EIFAC

12.

Any other matters

13.

Election of EIFAC Officers

14.

Date and place of the Twenty-second Session

15.

Ad hoc Working Parties

16.

Adoption of the Report

17.

Closing of the Session

Appendix B
LIST OF DOCUMENTS

EIFAC/XXI/2000/1 Rev.

Provisional Agenda and Timetable

EIFAC/XXI/2000/2

Summary Record of Meeting of the EIFAC Executive Committee, Rome, 14-15 June 1999

EIFAC/XXI/2000/3

Summary Report of the Symposium

EIFAC/XXI/2000/4

European Commission Proposal for the Symposium in Connection with the Twenty-second Session of EIFAC

EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.1 Rev.

Provisional List of Documents

EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.2

List of Participants

EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.3

Prospectus of the Symposium

EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.4

Analysis of European Catch and Aquaculture Statistics

EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.5

Progress Report, Sub-Commission I

EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.6

Progress Report, Sub-Commission II

EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.7

Progress Report, Sub-Commission III

EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.8

Progress Report, Sub-Commission IV

EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.9

List of EIFAC Correspondents

EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.10

Opening Addresses

EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.11

Aquatic Resources Management in European Aquaculture

EIFAC/XXI/2000/Inf.12

Statement of Competence and Voting Rights by the European Community and its Member States

Appendix C
LIST OF PARTICIPANTS

MEMBERS OF THE COMMISSION/MEMBRES DE LA COMMISSION

Albania/Albanie

Austria/Autriche

KAINZ, Erich
Federal Agency for Water Management
Institute for Water Ecology, Fisheries and Lake Research
Scharfling 18
A-5310 Mondsee
Fax: (+43-6232) 3847-33
E-mail: edv@igf.bmlf.gv.at

Belgium/Belgique

GERARD, Pierre
Ministère de la Region Wallonne
Avenue Maréchal Juin, 23
B-5030-Gembloux
Fax: (+32-81) 615727
E-mail: p.gerard@mrw.wallonie.be

Bulgaria/Bulgarie

Croatia/Croatie

SUIĆ, Josip
Fisheries Directory
Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry
Ulica grada Vukovara 78
HR-
10000 Zagreb
Fax: (+385-1) 6109208
E-mail: josip.suic@mps.hr

Cyprus/Chypre

Czech Republic/République Tchèque

Denmark/Danemark

RASMUSSEN, Gorm
Danish Institute for Fisheries Research
Department of Inland Fisheries
Vejlsoevej 39
DK-8600 Silkeborg
Fax: (+45) 89213150
E-mail: gr@dfu.min.dk

GEERTZ-HANSEN, Peter
Danish Institute for Fisheries Research
Department of Inland Fisheries
Vejlsoevej 39
DK-8600 Silkeborg
Fax: (+45) 89213150
E-mail: pgh@dfu.min.dk

Estonia/Estonie

VETEMAA, Markus
University of Tartu
Institute of Zoology and Hydrobiology
Vanemuise St. 46
Tartu 51014
Fax: (+372-7) 375830
E-mail: mvetemaa@ut.ee

European Community/Communauté Européenne

VAMVAKAS, Constantin
Commission Européenne
Direction générale de la pêche
200, rue de la Loi
B-1049 Bruxelles
Fax: (+32-2) 2951940
E-mail: constantin.vamvakas@cec.eu.int

Finland/Finlande

TUUNAINEN, Pekka
Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute
Pukinmäenaukio 4
P.O.Box 6
FIN-00721 Helsinki
Fax: (+358-205) 751201
E-mail: pekka.tuunainen@rktl.fi

AUVINEN, Heikki
Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute
Saimaa Fisheries Research and Aquaculture
Laasalantie 9
FIN-58175 Enonkoski
Fax: (+358-205) 751609
E-mail: heikki.auvinen@rktl.fi

LEHTONEN, Hannu
Department of Limnology and Environmental Protection
P.O. Box 27
FIN-00014 Helsinki
Fax: (+358-9) 708 5857
E-mail: Hannu.Lehtonen@helsinki.fi

SIPPONEN, Matti
Employment and Economic Develop-ment Centre for Central Finland
P.O. Box 44
FIN-40101 Jyväskylä
Fax: (+358-14) 4104747
E-mail: matti.sipponen@te-keskus.fi

France

COURCOL, Christian
Ministère de l’agriculture et de la pêche
Direction des pêches maritimes et de l’aquaculture
Bureau de la pisciculture
3, place de Fontenoy
F-75007 Paris
Fax: (+33-1) 49555984
E-mail: christian.courcol
@agriculture.gouv.fr

BOISNEAU, Philippe
Secrétaire général de la coordination
nationale de la pêche professionnelle en eau douce
La Bardoire
F-37150 Chisseaux
Fax: (+33-2) 47238609
E-mail: boisneau@univ-tours.fr

CHANGEUX, Thomas
Conseil supérieur de la pêche
Direction générale - Service technique
134, avenue de Malakoff
F-75116 Paris
Fax: (+33-1) 45012723
E-mail: thomas.changeux
@paris.environnement.gouv.fr

GERDEAUX, Daniel
Laboratoire d’hydrobiologie lacustre, INRA
BP 511
F-74203 Thonon Cedex
Fax: (+33-4) 50260760
E-mail: gerdeaux@thonon.inra.fr

GUERNALEC, Cyrille
Comité national des pêches maritimes et des élevages marins
51, rue Salvador Allende
F-92027 Nanterre
Fax: (+33-1) 49000602
E-mail: cguernalec@comite-peches.fr

VILAINE, Louis
Comité national des pêches maritimes et des élevages marins
51, rue Salvador Allende
F-92027 Nanterre
Fax: (+33-1) 49000602
E-mail: lvilaine@comite-peches.fr

Germany/Allemagne

HILGE, Volker
BFA für Fischerei
Wulfsdorfer Weg 204
D-22926 Ahrensburg
Fax: (+49-4102) 898 207
E-mail: hilge_bfafi@compuserve.com

BRENNER, Tomás
Ministerium für Umwelt und Forsten
Kaiser-Friedrich-Strasse 1
D-55116 Mainz
Fax: (+49-6131) 165926
E-mail: tomas.brenner@wald-rlp.de

WEDEKIND, Helmut
Institute for Inland Fisheries
Potsdam-Sacrow
Jägerhof
D-14476 Gross Glienicke
Fax: (+49-33201) 40640
E-mail: helmut.wedekind@ifb-potsdam.de

Greece/Grèce

ECONOMIDIS, Panagiotis S.
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Department of Biology, Laboratory of Ichthyology
Box 134
GR-540 06 Thessaloniki
Fax: (+30-31) 998279
Email: psecon@bio.auth.gr

Hungary/Hongrie

PINTÉR, Károly
Ministry of Agriculture and Regional Development
Kossuth L. tér 11
H-1055 Budapest
Fax: (+36-1) 3014781
E-mail: karoly.pinter@fvm.hu

CSENGERI, Istvan
Fish Culture Research Institute
P.O. Box 47
H-5541 Szarvas
Fax: (+36-66) 312142
E-mail: csengeri@haki.hu

GABOR, Janos
Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development
H-1055 Kossuth tér 11
Budapest
Fax: (+36-1) 3014781
E-mail: karoly.pinter@fvm.hu

VÁRADI, László
Fish Culture Research Institute
P.O. Box 47
H-5541 Szarvas
Fax: (+36-66) 312142
E-mail: varadil@haki.hu

Iceland/Islande

ÓSKARSSON, Sumarlidi
Directorate of Freshwater Fisheries
Vagnhöfda 7
IS-110 Reykjavík
Fax: (+354) 5678850
E-mail: sumarlidi@veidimalastjori.is

Ireland/Irlande

FITZMAURICE, Paddy
Central Fisheries Board
Mobhi Boreen
Glasnevin, Dublin 9
Fax: (+353-1) 8360060

MORIARTY, Christopher
University of Dublin
Zoology Department
Trinity College
Dublin 2
E-mail: cm@iol.ie

Israel/Israël

Italy/Italie

BEDIN, Luca
Ministero Politiche Agricole e Forestali
Direzione Generale Pesca e Acquacoltura
Viale del Caravaggio, 107
00147 Roma
Fax: (+39) 0659084176
E-mail: pesca2@politicheagricole.it

MARINI, Raffaele
Commissariato Italiano
Commissione italo-svizzera per la pesca
Viale G. Modugno 42
I-16156 Genova
Fax: (+39) 0106967647
E-mail: raffaele.marini@aleph.it

Latvia/Lettonie

RIEKSTINS, Normunds
National Board of Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture
2, Republikas laukums
LV-1010 Riga
Fax: (+371) 7334892
E-mail: fish@com.latnet.lv

OZOLINA, Gunta (Ms)
National Board of Fisheries
Ministry of Agiculture
2, Republikas laukums
LV-1010 Riga
Fax: (+371) 7334892
E-mail: fish@com.latnet.lv

Lithuania/Lituanie

Luxembourg

KRIER, Ady
Administration des eaux et forêts
Service de la chasse et de la pêche
16, rue Eugène Ruppert
L-1025 Luxembourg
Fax: (+352) 402201-350
E-mail: ady.krier@ef.etat.lu

Netherlands/Pays-Bas

MUYRES, W.J.M.
Organization for the Improvement of Inland Fisheries (OVB)
Buxtehudelaan 1
P.O. Box 433
NL-3430 AK Nieuwegein
Fax: (+31-30) 6039874
E-mail: muyres@ovb.nl

RAAT, Lex (A.J.P.)
Organization for the Improvement of Inland Fisheries (OVB)
Buxtehudelaan 1
P.O. Box 433
NL-3430 AK Nieuwegein
Fax: (+31-30) 6058446
E-mail: raat@ovb.nl

Norway/Norvège

Poland/Pologne

STACHOWIAK, Piotr M.
Ministerstwo Rolnictwa I Rozwoju WSI
Department Rybolówstwa
Ul. Wspólna 30
00-930 Warszawa
Fax: (+22) 6232204
E-mail: P.Stachowiak@minrol.gov.pl

BNINSKA, Maria (Ms)
Inland Fisheries Institute
Ul. Oczapowskiego 10
10-719 Olsztyn 5
Fax: (+48-89) 5240505
E-mail: irs@uwm.edu.pl

Portugal

BOCHECHAS, Jorge
Divisão de Pesca nas Águas Interiores
Direcção Geral das Florestas
Av. 5 Outubro 52-6ºD
1050-058 Lisboa
Fax: (+351-21) 3156188
E-mail: jorge.bochechas@dgf.min-agricultura.pt

COLLARES-PEREIRA, Maria João (Ms)
Centro de Biologia Ambiental
Dep. de Zoologia e Antropologia
Faculdade de Ciências de Lisboa
Campo Grande, C2
P-1749-016 Lisboa
Fax: (+351-21) 7500028
E-mail: mcolares@fc.ul.pt

Romania/Roumanie

Slovakia/Slovaquie

Spain/Espagne

Sweden/Suède

BENGTSSON, Bo
National Board of Fisheries
Dept. of Coastal and Freshwater Resources
P.O. Box 423
S-40126 Göteborg
Fax: (+46-31) 743044
E-mail: bo.bengtsson@fiskeriverket.se

HAMRIN, Stellan F.
National Board of Fisheries
Dept. of Coastal and Freshwater Resources
Institute for Freshwater Resources
S-17893 Drottningholm
Fax: (+46-8) 7590338
E-mail: stellan.hamrin@fiskeriverket.se

Switzerland/Suisse

STAUB, Erich
Office fédéral de  l'environnement, des forêts et du paysage
Division écologie et pêche
Hallwylstrasse 4
CH-3003 Berne
Fax: (+41-31) 3230371
E-mail: erich.staub@buwal.admin.ch

MÜLLER, Rudolf
EAWAG, Fisheries
CH-6047 Kastanienbaum
Fax: (+41-41) 3492162
E-mail: rudolf.mueller@eawag.ch

Turkey/Turquie

United Kingdom/Royaume-Uni

HICKLEY, Phil
National Coarse Fish Centre
The Environment Agency
Hoo Farm Industrial Estate
Worcester Road
Kidderminster DY11 7RA
Fax: (+44-1562) 69477
E-mail: phil.hickley@environment-agency.gov.uk

COWX, Ian G.
University of Hull
International Fisheries Institute
Hull HU6 7RX
Fax: (+44-1482) 470129
E-mail: i.g.cowx@biosci.hull.ac.uk

Yugoslavia/Yougoslavie

SECRETARIAT

FAO Subregional Office for Central and Eastern Europe
Benczúr utca 34
1068 Budapest
Hungary

SUCHMAN, Jaroslav
Subregional Representative
Fax: (+36-1) 3517029
E-mail: jaroslav.suchman@fao.org

FAO Fisheries Department
Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
I-00100 Rome
Italy/Italie

NAEVE, Heiner
Secretary of EIFAC
Fax: (+39) 0657053020
E-mail: heiner.naeve@fao.org

BARG, Uwe
Fishery Resources Officer
Fax: (+39) 0657053020
E-mail: uwe.barg@fao.org

GREBOVAL, Dominique
Senior Fishery Planning Officer
Fax: (+39) 0657056500
E-mail: dominique.greboval@fao.org

MARMULLA, Gerd
Fishery Resources Officer
Fax: (+39) 0657053020
E-mail: gerd.marmulla@fao.org

WEBB, Janet C. (Ms)
Meetings Officer
Fax: (+39) 0657056500
E-mail: janet.webb@fao.org

WELCOMME, Robin
Renewable Resources Assessment Group, Room 403
T.H. Huxley School of Environment, Earth Sciences and Engineering
Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine
Royal School of Mines
Prince Consort Road
London SW7 2BP
United Kingdom
Fax: (44-171) 5895319
E-mail: r.welcomme@ic.ac.uk

 

FORNALE, Rita (Ms)
Fax: (+39) 0657053020
E-mail: rita.fornale@fao.org

SOLA, Rine (Ms)
Fax: (+39) 0657053020
E-mail: rine.sola@fao.org

Interpreters/Interprètes

CAMPLAN, Sylvie (Ms)
JAMATI-SCOLARI, Nadia (Ms)
TANGO, Anne (Ms)
TOMASETTI, Teresa (Ms)

Appendix D
OPENING ADDRESSES

Address by
Mr Imre Mucsi
Deputy State Secretary Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development

On behalf of the Hungarian Government I want to welcome all of you to the Twenty-first Session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission and to the related Symposium on Fisheries and Society. We are very glad that you have decided to have this important event in Hungary when we are celebrating the millennium of the Hungarian State.

For people living under the changing hydrogeographical conditions of the Carpatian basin it was absolutely indispensable to know the waters - especially the rivers - and to utilize them. This resulted in very rich fishery traditions, use of very wide range of fishing gears and as a consequence - the ability of regeneration. When by the end of the nineteenth century - following the improvement of riverways - the natural fish production capacity of our rivers declined, the traditional fishery was not able to ensure source of livelihood for so many people as in the previous centuries. At the same time the role of fish as easily available food for local population also decreased.

Solution for this problem was offered by the regeneration of fisheries by the development of pond farming. Construction of still water pond farms in Hungary started in the last decades of the nineteenth century. The present total productive area of such ponds in Hungary is about twenty two thousand hectares, which is a very high value in comparison with other European countries. I would like to add to this data that the present agricultural policy considers pond construction and reconstruction a priority area and ensures state aid for these activities. We are convinced that construction of fish ponds is a very effective and perspective way to utilize land area less suitable for other agricultural purposes. It is a perspective solution as we expect a considerable increase in demand for fish and fishery products as a result of increased prosperity of the population and due to changing mode of living. It is one of the objectives of our agricultural policy to meet the demand for fish as far as possible from domestic production.

In the supply of Hungarian market our traditional natural water fisheries play only a minor role in comparison with the carp produced in pond farms or with the marine fish products originating from imports. Fish caught from natural waters ensure a wider variety of goods and meet special demands of the gastronomy. Nevertheless, we are very proud of the fact that the traditional natural water fisheries still exist in Hungary in spite of unfavourable conditions in some periods of the past.

In our days - like in other developed industrial societies - recreational activities as angling and sportfishing have the priority in utilization of fish stocks. Traditional fisheries carry out restocking programmes and regulatory harvesting of stocks in order to create more favourable conditions for recreational fisheries in which every year three hundred sixty thousand Hungarian citizens take part as well as thousands of foreign visitors.

Openness was the characteristic feature of the Hungarian fisheries even in times when - because of well known political and economic reasons - it could not be stated in case of other branches of our national economy. This openness was manifested in the fact that part of our fishery products was sold in international markets and also in the participation of Hungarian experts in fisheries and aquaculture development projects in all parts of the world. Due to this openness the process of integration into the European Union in the case of fisheries seems to be less painful than in agriculture. I would like to acquaint you with the main phases of this process in the fisheries sector.

In 1996 Hungary answered the detailed questionnaires of the EU Commission which contained a special chapter on fisheries. In 1998 the screening of EU and Hungarian fishery legislation - including regulation of fish trade - was carried out. The accession negotiations in fisheries were terminated in the first half of 1999. In May 1999 the fisheries chapter of the negotiations was closed - as the first one of those belonging to the competence of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development.

International reputation of Hungarian fisheries has been achieved mainly on the basis of scientific background. Institutional fisheries research started in Hungary more than ninety years ago, when the Royal Experimental Station for Fish Physiology and Wastewater Purification was established in 1906. The experimental station was located in Budapest at that time, and after several reorganizations and relocations, as well as changes of the name, the fisheries research station found its final place at Szarvas in 1953. The institute was upgraded in the frame of an FAO/UNDP supported development programme between 1975 and 1980. The Fish Culture Research Institute (its internationally known acronym is HAKI) became an acknowledged research and training centre.

The institute is a governmental organization supervised by the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development that provides core funding of about 40 percent of the total annual budget. Thus the larger part of the budget derives from competitive grants, consultancies, services and training programmes, through the intensive utilization of the wide range of expertise and complex facilities. The main research philosophy of HAKI is to link science to practical application, it means to provide scientific basis for the development of fisheries and fish culture technologies under various conditions from natural waters to intensive fish rearing systems.

In spite of the fact that Eastern European institutions have been rather isolated internationally in the past, HAKI scientists and aquaculturists have been actively involved in international collaborations not only in the field of research but also in aquaculture and fisheries development projects world-wide. HAKI experts assisted numerous aquaculture programmes in developing countries in Asia, Africa and South America.

The other internationally recognized institution of the Hungarian fisheries, the Warm Water Fish Hatchery, the TEHAG, located at Százhalombatta has been established by the help of the World Food Programme. Since 1974 this farm has been operated as a pilot farm of the development of fish culture in Hungary and also in countries of the Third World. Especially the training courses organized for fishery experts and consultancies in Latin America ensured good international reputation for this farm.

In the early 1990s when the process of privatization took place in the Hungarian fisheries the government declared that TEHAG - because of its international tasks and strategic role in the Hungarian fisheries - will remain a state property. The farm is supervised - both financially and professionally - by the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development. Its pond area has been increased during the last few years to 500 hectares, and a general reconstruction programme has been started since 1999 financed completely by the government. In the framework of this programme first the hatchery building and the water supply network of the ponds have been reconstructed. Next steps of the programme - in the years 2000 and 2001 - will be the establishment of high-tech processing unit specially for freshwater fish and then the renovation of all pond facilities.

The objective of my lecture was to show that the Hungarian Government gives priority to the development of freshwater fisheries and ensures financial support to this both in the scientific sphere and in the production activities.

I have presented two institutions directly supervised by the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, but I have to mention that fisheries research and training activities are actually performed by all agricultural universities of the country. Among institutions belonging to the Hungarain Academy of Sciences especially three institutions contributed to the development of fisheries sciences. These are the Balaton Limnological Research Institute in Tihany, the Hungarian Danube Research Station in Göd and the Institute of Veterinary Sciences located in Budapest.

I hope that this Session and the Symposium will contribute to the maintenance of best fishery traditions in the third millennium and also to the even closer cooperation of fishery experts in the conservation and sustainable use of our natural environment, as well as to the development of recreational activities and a more healthy human nutrition. With regard to these objectives, on behalf of the Hungarian Government, I open the EIFAC Session and the related Symposium on Fisheries and Society.

Thank you for your attention.

Address by
Mr Jaroslav Suchman
Subregional Representative for Central and Eastern Europe, FAO SEUR

It is my pleasure to address the Twenty-first Session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission on behalf of the Director-General of FAO, Mr Jaques Diouf, as his Representative for Central and Eastern Europe, and Mr Ichiro Nomura, Assistant Director-General of the Fisheries Department. Organization of such workshops, like this one is, in my opinion, an important occasion to have the opportunity to cooperate with the Hungarian Government.

I also wish to express my appreciation to the organizers of this seminar for giving me the opportunity to present brief information about the activities of FAO Subregional Office for Central and Eastern Europe to such a distinguished audience.

The Subregional Office for Central and Eastern Europe (SEUR) has been established in October 1995. Thanks to the hospitality of the Government of Hungary it is located in Budapest.

Today, the Office is fully staffed and operational including 7 professionals and 7 persons of support staff.

The main tasks of the Office are to:

Thus, the Office is serving the role of a sensor, located in the first line of the front with main task to monitor the developments in the Region, transmit to HQ the needs of the Region and identify priority areas for action. The Office, as such, if I may continue using military terminology, should use its limited resources and ammunition within the priority areas, as defined by member countries themselves prior to the establishment of the Subregional Office and which are reflected by the expertise made available to the Subregional Office, which is as follows:

I will highlight only some of the activities which, I assume, are of interest to you:

The major strength of FAO resides in its technical expertise and independence or probably the word "neutrality" will be better in this case. With these two strong points FAO is able - when requested by member governments - to organize a number of technical meetings at global, regional or national level to discuss and provide unbiased advice on important policy and technical issues, often of sensitive nature. FAO, through its neutral and high quality technical meetings, contributed to the elaboration and adoption of a number of international agreements setting quality standards or codes of conduct. However, majority of the meetings like workshops, training courses and seminars or studies are geared to provide neutral forum for the exchange of technical or scientific information, as well as discussion of specific problems and options available for their solution. These are the so called FAO normative activities, which are of interest to all or a large number of member countries.

Another way of assistance to the Member Nations is through specific projects implemented with technical assistance of FAO in a specific country and seeking to help resolve problems of a particular nature or remove constraints with the view to promote the agricultural and rural development in the country.

Since its foundation in 1957, EIFAC has grown from 16 members to 34, and I have the honour to announce that during the last intersessional period Iceland and Latvia did come on board.

In all these years the Commission has performed an important task in drawing the attention of its members to the importance of the sector of inland fisheries and aquaculture in the socio-economic context of the countries, an issue which has been taken up by the Symposium attached to this Session.

EIFAC continued to serve as a forum for exchange of information and for ensuring a common approach to inland fisheries throughout Europe. Indeed, for many years of its existence there has been no other body charged with the international aspects of inland fisheries. This has changed during the last 10 years, and with the imminent accession of a number of Central and Eastern European countries to the European Union also the role of EIFAC may change.

The achievements of the Commission are the achievements of its members and the voluntary contributions of scientists from every country have contributed to its work. The Commission’s achievements have been significant, as reflected by the numerous high quality publications either funded by FAO or its member countries. This remains an example for other Commissions to aspire to.

FAO is convinced that EIFAC will continue to play an important role in the management of European inland fisheries, and we will do whatever is possible to facilitate EIFAC’s work also in the future.

I am very glad that so many delegates and experts have been able to come here and I would like to thank you all in advance for the valuable contributions you will no doubt make to this Session and the Symposium attached to it.

Full success to your work.

Köszönöm a figyelmüket!

Address by
the Chairperson of EIFAC,
Mr Christopher Moriarty, Ireland

Honourable Deputy State Secretary, distinguished delegates, dear friends and colleagues.

It is my great pleasure to welcome you to the Twenty-first Session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission and the associated Symposium on Fisheries and Society in this beautiful city of Budapest.

On behalf of all the participants, I would like to ask you, Deputy State Secretary, to convey to your Government our gratitude for your kind invitation to hold the Twenty-first Session here in Hungary and to thank the Fish Culture Research Institute for the excellent arrangements.

This is the second time that Hungary has been the host country for EIFAC. The Twelfth Session was held here in Budapest and the subject of the Symposium was Stock Enhancement. I have to say that this is my first visit to Hungary - but I was happy to see that both of the Vice-chairs of EIFAC, Károly Pintér and Maria Bninska, took part in that meeting in 1982. On that occasion, the Chairperson, Professor K. Tiews, drew particular attention to the achievements of Hungary both in advancing new technologies and in disseminating its experience both around European countries and also to developing countries. It is very good to hear today from the Deputy State Secretary that Hungarian workers continue to take a lead in this respect.

With great regret I have to inform you of the death of our former colleague Jørgen Dahl of the Danish Inland Fisheries Institute. Jørgen represented his country at the First Session of EIFAC, held in Dublin 40 years ago, and until his retirement, was one of the most active members of the Commission, serving finally as a Vice-Chairperson.

Looking down the list of participants at the First Session, I see that I am the only person still involved in EIFAC - although I am happy to say that a number of the others are still alive and active in fisheries work.

The best news concerning EIFAC is that we are still growing. Fourteen member countries and one observer were represented in Dublin in 1960. Today we have 34 members. What is particularly pleasing about this is that our membership is still growing. Since the last Session, two countries, Iceland and Latvia have joined the Commission and I extend a warm welcome to their delegates. When you ask yourself the question: does EIFAC still have relevance forty years after its foundation, when so much has changed? The fact that membership continues to grow is a very clear indication of the value of the work of the Commission.

EIFAC is a Commission of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. We share with some fisheries sectors of FAO the professional services of the Secretariat team under the able leadership of Heiner Naeve. Apart from experts occasionally employed as consultants, the work of EIFAC depends entirely on the personal commitment of individuals, all of whom are employed in other capacities within their countries. The member countries make a threefold contribution to the work of the Commission, firstly through the provision of funds to FAO, secondly, in many cases, by allowing their employees to devote some of their time to EIFAC, and, thirdly, by making the very considerable contribution of hosting the biennial Sessions and the meetings of Working Parties.

None of these situations is entirely satisfactory. It is quite difficult to make a case within FAO for the sort of increased funding for EIFAC that would allow it to recruit a full-time team of experts. It is equally difficult for the individuals, faced by ever-increasing workloads, to devote to EIFAC the time that its activities deserve. We have discussed these problems in the past - and will continue to do so. Fisheries managers and scientists are well aware of the value of the work of EIFAC, particularly in its achievements in tackling subjects of mutual interest and in the preparation of seminal publications. But we face a serious psychological problem in that the value of such achievements cannot be quantified in the terms which are readily comprehensible to those who take decisions on priorities in the distribution of funds.

Our examination of this problem at the last Session has led to the realization that, apart from report material, EIFAC had never made available any publication to inform the authorities or the fishing public of its existence, to say nothing of its contribution to fisheries management. Since then we have developed a web page and produced a leaflet, both of which summarize the activities of EIFAC and, above all, indicate the expertise which it can make available to planners.

During the intersessional, papers presented at the Twentieth Session Symposium on Water for Sustainable Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture were published as a special issue of Fisheries Management and Ecology, edited by Rudolf Müller and Heiner Naeve.

Most of you are here to take part in the Symposium on Fisheries and Society which will begin later today. I would like to thank the Chairperson of the Symposium Károly Pintér and the Convenor Matti Sipponen for their good work in making the arrangements and to thank all of those who are contributing papers or posters. At each EIFAC Session, the first part of the business is the symposium. It provides us all with a relatively rare opportunity to consider the subject on a continent-wide basis, rather than from a national or regional point of view.

The second part of the Session will begin next Monday and gives delegates the opportunity to review the work which has taken place in the last two years and to plan for the future.

My introduction to the Twentieth Session of EIFAC two years ago drew attention to a considerable number of listed topics on which no progress had been made. I believe that my address today is very much more positive. During the Twentieth Session we agreed to a considerable streamlining of our activities, including a more concentrated programme for this session. I am very happy to say this evening that progress has been made in all directions.

Thank you ladies and gentlemen, I look forward with you to a stimulating Symposium and Session.

Appendix E
SUMMARY REPORT OF THE SYMPOSIUM ON FISHERIES AND SOCIETY

INTRODUCTION

1. A Symposium on Fisheries and Society was organized in conjunction with the Twenty-first Session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission (EIFAC) in Budapest, Hungary from 1 to 3 June 2000. Mr M. Sipponen (Finland) convened the Symposium, which was chaired by Mr K. Pintér (Hungary). The Symposium was attended by 99 participants from 27 countries.

REVIEW OF FISHERIES MANAGEMENT AND POLICY ISSUES

2. Inland fisheries management in most European and North American countries tends increasingly to emphasize recreation and conservation rather than the older function of food production. Many of the problems currently facing managers lie in the transition from commercial to recreational fishing. Recreational fishing is thought to have a growing socio-economic benefit to society, through increased rent and through the development of tourism.

3. The transition from commercial to recreational use has been the cause of conflict between commercial and recreational fishermen and between recreational fishermen and conservationists. Many of the misunderstandings underlying these conflicts lie in difficulties of communication between the disciplines for lack of a common technical language. There is also a lack of appropriate mechanisms for dialogue and conflict resolution in some areas. However, the failure of dialogue between the two sectors of the fishing community more frequently arises through a lack of willingness on the part of the stronger group to discuss resource allocation with the minority group from a political perspective. Increasing demand for recreational fishing has put pressure on the natural, wild and the more remote fisheries. This has led to conflicts between local inhabitants and those who are not permanently resident in the locality.

4. The change in the political climate in Eastern Europe has resulted in a move away from a planned economy to one that is demand led. This has meant the development of new systems of management, which in shared water bodies can involve more than one country. There is still a lack of acceptance of laws that are aimed at safeguarding the stock.

5. The growth in recreational fishing has generated significant illegal movements of fish intra- and inter-nationally. Such trade has been generated in order to meet anglers’ expectations, which are often obtained in countries other than the one in which they are resident. The main species subject to such movements are carp (Cyprinus carpio), wels catfish (Siluris glanis), crucian carp (Carassius auratus gibelio), a small number of sturgeon and crayfish species. The illegal movement of fish has led to the establishment of a number of non-native species in countries from which they were previously absent. It has also had implications for fish health as in the case of the co-introduction of a number of novel parasites (Ergasilids) which have been responsible for fish mortalities.

6. Fisheries science has widened its remit by including studies of the social and economic aspects of fishing. It has thus enlarged its view from that of concern with only the fish and its habitat to take into account the human dimension including fishermen’s preferences, attitudes and choices.

7. Co-management is one possible mechanism to ensure that the sociological aspects are accounted for. This inclusive approach to management brings together all aspects of the community and encourages a sense of ownership of the process and of the resources. The first step in moving towards active co-management is to analyse stakeholder structure, The next steps are to strengthen user organizations, adopt a participatory approach to management and to establish an adequate institutional framework for effective dialogue. Finally, the process of sharing responsibilities for management can be initiated.

8. Inclusion of all stakeholders in co-management systems ensures that decisions better reflect local, social, economic and environmental conditions. The success of co-management depends on meeting short-term economic and social aspirations of stakeholders, otherwise enthusiasm for the system is difficult to sustain.

9. In order for the various user groups to engage in meaningful dialogue, communication needs to be established through a common technical language. This tends to be difficult as fishermen tend to rely on their own experience and on anecdotal information whereas scientists rely more on informed opinion based on quantitative information.

10. Cooperative management is a mechanism whereby two or more countries agree on an approach to management of a transboundary water body. Representatives of fishery administrations, surveillance organizations, ichthyologists and fishermen meet within a formal framework to reach decisions based on consensus. Rivers and lakes that have been managed cooperatively have proved more sustainable than those where individual efforts by riparian countries are contradictory and confusing.

11. Providing fishing opportunities closer to the urban areas where most people live can reduce pressures on natural fisheries. There is, therefore, an urgent need to improve fishing sites in areas close to towns. Such urban fisheries need to be artificially maintained to produce higher catches than would otherwise be sustainable. Co-management approaches are needed to ensure that natural fisheries are managed sustainably and that they still generate angling tourism. Dialogue between local and tourism communities is needed, as is a commitment on the part of non-resident stakeholders.

ASSESSMENT AND VALUATION OF INLAND FISHERIES

12. Knowledge of the three sectors of European inland fisheries differs widely. Aquaculture is generally well understood with regard to its component enterprises, production techniques, species reared, market structure and economics. Less is known about the more complicated structure of food fisheries in rivers and lakes where the overlap between subsistence and commerce is particularly ill defined. Recreational fisheries with their substantial numbers of active anglers, who are divided into sub-cultures and are often not formally organized, are even more difficult to study. Generally, little is known about the motivations and expectations of anglers and the benefits that society may derive from their activities. This lack of knowledge is limiting in view of the increasing importance of recreational fisheries relative to commercial fisheries over most of Europe during recent years.

13. Two main approaches to management of recreational fisheries are common in Europe: (a) the protection of the aquatic environment by using its natural productivity but limiting the number of anglers supported, or (b) increasing angling opportunity through stocking and intensive management of the ecosystem. Each of these management systems has social and environmental benefits and costs that should correspond to the goals of the society in which they are applied.

14. Fishery associations and fish-watch services can play a valuable role in the re-establishment and maintenance of fish stocks and nature protection, particularly where war and other social and economic disruptions have damaged the resource.

15. Fisheries management is increasingly concerned with the management of people’s activity rather than the management of the fish stock. This has led to an increase in the number of studies aimed at determining the various human dimensions involved. Several different techniques have been elaborated to obtain relevant information. Most of these centre round various approaches to surveys to elucidate angler behaviour and preferences, and to assess economic value and dynamics. Fishery biologists and social scientists must cooperate to link biological criteria and catch and effort data to social and economic data from anglers. Despite these efforts an apparent lack of basic information on recreational fisheries and fishermen persists in a number of European countries.

16. A unified survey was carried out on recreational fisheries management and socio-economics in the five Nordic countries - Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Norway and Iceland. The different institutional backgrounds and affiliations of the partners involved and their possibilities to fund their continued participation in the project received attention. Problems experienced in random sampling of population addresses from official registers due to differences in the definition of recreational fisheries and fishermen and to the fact that not all questions in questionnaires applied to the situation in a specific participating country were resolved. Combined surveys have been carried out successfully on several lakes in Texas, USA.

17. Fisheries in the rivers and lakes of Finland had been organized by statutory fishery associations in the past. These have not been effective especially with regard to commercial fisheries. At the same time the importance of recreational fisheries and aquaculture has increased although the commercial sector has remained static or even declined.

18. The efficiency of Finnish inland fisheries has been enhanced by a reorganization of the system, creating fisheries regions and introducing co-management schemes. Common goals were defined taking into account the interests of all parties involved, including owners of fishing rights, fishermen, administrators and researchers. These goals have helped in the implementation of the fishery policy. In general, priority is given to recreation in private waters, whereas commercial fisheries have been given priority in state-owned waters.

PERSPECTIVES IN INLAND FISHERIES

19. The next decade will be critical in ensuring the sustainable development of European inland fisheries and aquaculture. Increased pressures on the resource from recreational demand and environmental damage mean that all applicable methods should be used for planning and applied resource management. Models should be elaborated which give a macro-economic perspective. The socio-economic value of the fishery and of related activities should be established more precisely and the various needs of resource users, and new scientific and technical developments taken into account.

20. In general, aquaculture is directed at satisfying food requirements in general through improved supply, quality, price and marketing. Aquaculture should also support needs related to the availability of fish for restocking water bodies for production, recreation and for the preservation of biodiversity. In view of the ongoing debate in Europe a position should eventually be developed by members of EIFAC with regard to Genetically Modified Organisms.

21. Subsistence fisheries still constitute a significant socio-economic activity in some areas. These should be kept under review to assess changes occurring in the activity and required policy adjustments.

22. Artisanal fisheries should be assessed separately from commercial fisheries, if only because the artisanal sector generally relies more on traditional methods and techniques that may be less destructive and more appropriate for meeting conservation objectives. These methods may also need to be preserved as a historical and cultural heritage that may further prove useful for defining improved exploitation and management methods.

23. Commercial fishing is an important sector in financial terms. Market forces directly drive this sector. It generates direct returns and employment benefit that can be substantial at the level of local economies. Increasing development of this sector may generate conflicts with other users and lead to serious resource overexploitation.

24. Recreational fisheries have grown in importance throughout Europe in recent years and have been the object of increased research. Research and fisheries administrations have been especially involved in the assessment of the production and socio-economic value of this activity as compared with other more commercial uses. The role of recreational fisheries should be better recognized and recreational fishers should be involved more systematically in the management of fisheries.

25. Conflicts between resource users can occur as a result of direct competition for the same fishery resource, or because resource and environmental degradation caused by one category of users is not acceptable by other users. In some cases these conflicts are resolved by limitations on access or by partitioning the resource in space or time to allow access to a greater range of users.

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

26. The Symposium demonstrated that the value of the inland fisheries resources in member countries of EIFAC considerably exceeds previous estimates albeit on the basis of preliminary studies. Indications are that in coming years there will be an increased demand for inland fishery products including especially recreational use. There will also be a continued demand on water and aquatic environments for purposes other than fisheries. Inland fisheries resources will not be able to sustain increased levels of production and alternative use without careful management of the fish, the aquatic environments and the human elements of the fisheries represented by the various stakeholders. In general the members of EIFAC should endeavour to encourage policies directed at increasing the capacity of the inland fisheries to meet sustainably the expectation that the public place upon them.

Co-management

27. Co-management is a valuable tool for the sustainable management of fisheries. It should also facilitate the resolution of potential conflicts among user groups. Fisheries administrations need to better recognize the need for co-management and to support improved institutional and organizational mechanisms to facilitate the adoption of this mechanism. Dialogue between all stakeholders in the fisheries is normally part of co-management but dialogue between local and tourism communities is also needed, as is a commitment on the part of non-resident stakeholders.

28. There are clear indications that fisheries in international and shared rivers and lakes are better managed if collaborative mechanisms are in place. Mechanisms for collaborative management of trans-national lakes and rivers should therefore be established where they do not already exist.

29. The high degree of interactivity between the various users of inland waters and the impacts that can result from poor management practice within a watershed make it essential that appropriate linkages between fishery administrations and various user groups are maintained. These should serve as mechanisms for negotiations to ensure that at least the minimum requirements for the maintenance of healthy fish communities are established.

30. The growing importance of the human dimensions of inland fisheries means that social scientists should be more closely involved in research and management of the fishery. Their role should be to elucidate the complex linkages that underlie fishery policy formulation to ensure that all stakeholders are included in dialogues regarding the fishery and to resolve any possible conflicts.

Database, statistics, science

31. Basic information on recreational fisheries is still incomplete in some parts of Europe. Efforts should be increased to better this situation. Techniques developed for the estimation of environmental goods that have so far been rarely applied to inland fisheries in Europe should be further assessed and promoted.

32. Technical terms should be defined when starting joint projects, be it on the level of different disciplines or among neighbouring countries on the same subject.

33. In view of the need for a better understanding of socio-economic issues, surveys should be undertaken more systematically in EIFAC member countries. It is recommended that EIFAC’s Working Party on Socio-economic Aspects of Inland Fisheries organize an ad hoc workshop on methodologies for socio-economic surveys. This should build upon the existing experience as reflected in contributions to this Symposium to review concepts and methodologies and to ensure harmonized approaches to future studies.

Environmental issues

34. The fishing community should be prepared to meet the increasing concerns of the animal welfare movement, particularly with regard to catch-and-release fisheries.

35. Prospective assessment and long-term projections should be carried out so as to facilitate and improve the management process. An integrated approach is required at this level and assessments should concern all key factors (resource, environment, and socio-economic variables such as population trends, etc.). This is all the more important if one considers that management should satisfy various socio-economic needs, as well as the requirements for the protection of the resource and its environment.

36. EIFAC involvement with the problem of illegal international movements of fish could be achieved by national contacts working closely together to raise awareness of the ecological threat of such practice and thus draw the serious nature of the problem to the attention of the enforcement agencies. The development of an international network across Europe and the development of awareness building programmes would be the first step in trying to reduce this problem.

Financing

37. In view of the demonstrated importance of the inland fisheries sector, the growing challenges for its sustainable management and the increasing international dimensions of tourism and environmental concerns, the Symposium felt that collaborative efforts and technical cooperation among members should be strengthened. It urged EIFAC to intensify intersessional activities through cooperative programmes on key technical and management issues. Financing should be sought in support of such programmes.

38. In view of the important contribution of recreational fishing to society, appropriate financing should be allocated to the sector by governments.

Education and communication

39. A system of education of commercial fishermen is a good basis for ensuring the future of inland fisheries. Programmes should also be developed for the education of anglers where not already in existence. Efficient communication projects should also be promoted to raise public awareness of the benefits of inland fisheries.

Management policy

40. Efforts should be increased to rehabilitate and improve the state of rivers, lakes and lagoons with a view to preserving sustainable fishing activities.

41. To conform to consumer preferences towards shorter fishing trips and to the growing urbanization of European societies there is an urgent need to improve fishing sites in areas close to towns.

42. Subject to management requirements, access to fishing grounds should be maintained for commercial fishermen where traditional access rights already exist or where there are strong economic and social justifications.

 

Appendix F
EIFAC SYMPOSIUM ON
INLAND FISHERIES MANAGEMENT AND THE AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT

June 2002

PROSPECTUS AND FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS

The European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission will hold a Symposium on Inland Fisheries Management and the Aquatic Environment in connection with its Twenty-second Session in June 2002.

Rationale

There is an increasing requirement for an international forum to consolidate our understanding of the inter-relationship between fisheries management activities and other environmental issues. The relationships between environment and fisheries act in two directions: first, adverse and beneficial environmental activities which impinge on fish populations and fish communities (e.g. physical disturbances, pollution); and secondly, the effects of fish and fisheries management practices on the environment (e.g. improvement of fish habitats contributes to a better quality of the environment; modifications of the structure of fish communities change the food web and can improve the water quality; or, alternatively, stock enhancement or rehabilitation may lead to an unforeseen deterioration in the ecosystem or loss of biodiversity).

The focus of this Symposium will be on the effects of fish and fisheries management practices on the aquatic environment.

Symposium objectives

Themes

The EIFAC Symposium on Inland Fisheries Management and the Aquatic Environment aims to collect and discuss case studies on the benefits and negative impacts of fisheries management measures on the aquatic environment. The Symposium will deal with these effects in three sessions:

  1. Management of fish communities (e.g., biomanipulation, introduction and stocking practice).

  2. Fishing activities (e.g., capture methods, selection of fishing gear, side effects of fishing activities on benthic and riparian communities).

  3. Fish habitat modifications (including rehabilitation measures, mitigation measures).

The case studies are likely to include topics such as:

The Symposium is addressed to stakeholders in several levels of the decision making process, user groups and scientists. Participation and contributions are expected from persons in various institutions like:

The Symposium should contribute to a better awareness of the role and effect of good fisheries management practices on the aquatic environment and show how fisheries management measures can be applied to maximize the positive effects and to minimize the negative impact on the environment. The Symposium should identify and guide actions to be taken both within the fisheries sector and by agencies and persons involved in environmental management issues. The output should lead to an integrated management of fish stocks in which fisheries and environmental objectives are met.

Call for Papers

Contributions are invited within any of the above broad headings. It is suggested that the majority will relate to experiences within countries, both reviewing past and present and predicting future opportunities for more sustainable and responsible management of fish, fish habitats and fisheries. Inter-active discussion during the Symposium will lead to a major statement embracing the entire concept of the inland fisheries of Europe. Anyone wishing to present a paper or poster display should submit a title by 31 March 2001 to the Secretary of EIFAC, Fishery Resources Division, FAO, Via delle Terme di Caracalla, 00100 Rome, Italy, E-mail: heiner.naeve@fao.org, Fax: (+39) 065705 3020.

Papers will be accepted in English or French, the working languages of EIFAC, but no interpretation will be provided during the Symposium. An abstract, not to exceed 150 words, of the proposed contribution should be submitted, preferably by e-mail, by 31 August 2001. The Steering Committee will review all abstracts in relation to the objectives and themes of the Symposium and the authors will be informed of the outcome by 1 December 2001. Successful authors must submit a full manuscript not later than 1 March 2002.

The Convener of the Symposium is Mr D. Gerdeaux (France), E-mail: gerdeaux @thonon.inra.fr, Fax: (+33-1) 5026 0760

The Chairman is Mr I. Cowx (United Kingdom), E-mail: i.g.cowx@biosci.hull.ac.uk, Fax: (+44-1482) 470129.


1

Subsequent to the Session, the ad hoc EIFAC/EC Working Party on Market Perspectives of European Freshwater Aquaculture was established under the umbrella of Sub-Commission II. Mr L. Váradi agreed to convene this working party.