Graft-transmissible diseases of citrus

-Handbook for detection and diagnosis of graft-transmissible diseases of citrus-


Table of contents


 

CORRIGENDUM
Page xiii
The address of Mr Steven M. Garnsey is now:

US Horticultural Research Laboratory
Agriculture Research Service
US Department of Agriculture
2120 Camden Road
Orlando, Florida 32803
United States of America

New publication data
M 14/T0601E/3.92/1500
ISBN 92-5-1031 82-7

C.N. Roistacher
Emeritus Plant Pathologist
University of California
Riverside, California, USA

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION OF CITRUS VIROLOGISTS
FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
Rome,1991

The designations employed and the presentation of material in this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise, without the prior permission of the copyright owner. Applications for such permission, with a statement of the purpose and extent of the reproduction, should be addressed to the Director,
Publications Division,
Food and Agriculture Organizabon of the United Nations,
Viale e delle Terme di Caracalla,
00100 Rome, Italy.

FAO, 1991


Contents


Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgements
Contributors
Abbreviations
Introduction
Part I.Techniques for biological detection of specific citrus graft-transmissible diseases

Inoculation procedures for detection of citrus graft-transmissible pathogens (CGTPs)
Tristeza
Greening
Stubborn
Blight and related diseases
Exocortis
Cachexia
Satsuma dwarf
Tatterleaf
Infectious variegation and leaf rugose
Psorosis complex: psorosis-A, psorosis-B and ringspot
Concave gum
Impietratura
Cristacortis
Vein enation (woody gall)
Gummy bark and transmissible bud-union disorders

Part II.Facilities and techniques for biological detection of CGTPS

The plant laboratory
The greenhouse
Soil mixes for plant growth
Production and care of indicator plants
Techniques for graft-transmission in citrus

Part III.Laboratory methods for detection of CGTPs

Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for citrus pathogens
Detection of plant viruses and viroids by molecular hybridization
Viroid purification and characterization
Immunosorbent electron microscopy (ISEM) and antibody coating
Isolation and analysis of CTV dsRNA from citrus bark
Isolation and culture of Spiroplasma citri
Detection of citrus tristeza virus inclusion bodies using azure a staining and in situ immunofluorescence

Part IV.Appendices

Laboratory equipment needed for selected diagnostic procedures
Glossary