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Appendices


Appendix 1: List of participants
Appendix 2: Detailed program of the seminar/ workshop
Appendix 3: Details of the group discussions
Appendix 4: Participants' impressions
Appendix 5: Field trip

Appendix 1: List of participants

Guest Speakers

Mr. Romeo Acosta
Director,
Special Concerns Division
Department of Environment & Natural Resources
Visayas Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City
Philippines
Telephone (632) 968346
Fax (632) 968346

Mr. Conrado Heruela
Wood Energy Assessment & Planning Specialist
Food & Agriculture Organization
Regional Wood Energy Development Program
Maliwan Mansion, Phra Athit Road
Bangkok, Thailand
Telephone (662) 2802760
Fax (662) 2800760
Email: RWEDP@fao.org

Dr. William Hulscher
Chief Technical Adviser
Food & Agriculture Organization
Regional Wood Energy Development Program
Maliwan Mansion, Phra Athit Road
Bangkok, Thailand
Telephone (662) 2802760
Fax (662) 2800760
Email: RWEDP@fao.org

Observers

Mr. Le Huy Dat
Secretary of the NATCOM
Forest Science Institute of Vietnam
Chem, Tu Liem, Hanoi, Vietnam
Telephone 344031
Fax 844345722

Mr. Sri Herwanto
Head, New Energy Promotion Section
Directorate General of Electricity and Energy Development
JL. H.R. Rasuna Said Block X-2, KAV.
07-08 Kuningan Jakarta 12950 Indonesia
Telephone 021-5225180

Mr. Rey V. Liganor
Senior Science Research Specialist
Department of Energy
Non-Conventional Energy Division
Merritt Road, Fort Bonifacio, Makati,
Metro Manila, Philippines
Telephone 818-8614; 8441021-44
Fax 818-8614

Mr. Milo Lilang
Science Research Specialist II
Department of Energy
Non-Conventional Energy Division
Merritt Road, Fort Bonifacio, Makati,
Metro Manila, Philippines
Telephone 818-8614
Fax 818-8614

Mr. Harry Oosterveen
Associate Professional Officer
Food and Agriculture Organization
Regional Wood Energy Development Program
Maliwan Mansion, Phra Athit Road
Bangkok, Thailand
Telephone (662) 2800760
Fax (662) 2800760
Email: RWEDP@fao.org

Mr. Pola Singh
Principal Asst. Director-Energy Section, EPU
Economic Planning Unit, Prime Minister's Department
Jalan Dato Onn 50502 Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia
Telephone (03) 2903746
Fax (03) 2022286

Dr. Pongpisit Viseshakul
Acting Director
Energy Conservation and Renewable
Energy Division National Energy Policy Office
78 Rachadamnern Nok Road
Bangkok 10300 Thailand
Telephone 662-280-2013 and 4
Fax 662-280-2040

Panelists

Mr. Efren T. Cortez
Acting Committee Secretary (LSO IV)
Committee on Energy
House of Representatives
Constitution Hill, Quezon City, Philippines
Telephone 931-65-05
Fax 931-62-65

Mr. Augusto S. Pagkalinawan
Supervising Economic Development Specialist
Infrastructure Staff
National Economic and Development Authority
3rd Floor, NEDA Bldg., Amber Ave., Pasig City
Telephone (632) 6313724/6313738
Fax (632) 6312188

Mr. Teotimo Redulla
Regional Technical Director
Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Region VII
Banilad, Mandaue City
Telephone 862-58

Mr. Robert Villa
Chief, Planning Services Division
Department of Agriculture
Elliptical Road, Diliman, Quezon City
Telephone 967439
Fax 990590

Ms. May Elizabeth Ybanez
Central Visayas Regional Projects II Team Leader
Central Visayas Regional Projects II/The World Bank
Department of Agriculture - Region VII
DA-VII Compound, M Velez Street, Cebu City
Telephone 223-865/223-684
Fax 223-865

Participants

Mr. Emilar Aquino
Executive Assistant
Office of Senator Tatad
2nd/F Marbella II Bldg. Roxas Blvd. Manila Philippines
Telephone 536-0256
Fax 536-0255

Mr. Rudy Bareng
Project Leader
Mariano Marcos Memorial State University
Affiliated Noncon Energy Center
Batac, Ilocos Norte
Telephone 792-3191
Fax 792-3191

Engr. Belen Bisana
Chief
Biomass Energy and Facilities
Engineering Section
Forest Products Research Development Institute
College, Laguna
Telephone 3630
Fax 0(93) 3630

Engr. Ramon M. Branzuela
Project Director
Voices Inc. - APPROTECH Asia
25 Samat St., Hacienda Heights,
Concepcion 21811
Telephone 0918-884375
Fax 6346973

Ms. Susana Cahiq
Technical Division Head
University of San Carlos - Affiliated Noncon Energy Center
P. del Rosario St., Cebu City
Telephone 221000 loc. 207
Fax (63) (32) 217183

Ms. Patrocinio De Castro
Senior Education Program Specialist
Department of Education Culture and Sports
NASA Complex, Meralco Avenue, Pasig City
Telephone 633-7267

Mr. Flarino Flauta
Supervising Project Development Officer IV
Special Concerns Office
Department of Agriculture
Elliptical Rd., Diliman, Quezon City
Telephone 989636-39

Dr. Segundino Foronda
Director
Forestry Research Division
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources,
Los Banos, Laguna
Telephone (94) 50015 to 20
Fax (94) 50016

Ms. Marina Hermoso
Project Development Chief
Department of Agriculture - VII
M. Velez St, Cebu City
Telephone 224-615
Fax 542-03

Dr. Samuel N. Koffa
Rural Energy Specialist
International Institute of Rural Reconstruction
Phil. Global Headquarters; Y.C. James Yen Center;
Telephone 58-2659/Cell 306-8584
Fax 5222494/US 2128702981

Engr. Antonio E. Labios
Officer-in-Charge
Visayas Field Office
Department of Energy
111F Metrobank Bldg., Osmena Blvd.,
Cebu City
Telephone 213-459/212-150
Fax 217-222

Ms. Isabelita Labus
Extension Division Head
University of San Carlos - Affiliated Noncon Energy Center
P. del Rosari St., Cebu City
Telephone 211-000 local 207
Fax (63) (32) 217183

Mr. Crisostomo C. Laplap
Engineer III
Visayas Field Office
Department of Energy
11th/F Metrobank Plaza Osmena Blvd.
Cebu City
Telephone 212-150/213-459
Fax 217-222

Mr. Francisco Largo
Science Research Assistant
University of San Carlos - Affiliated Noncon Energy Center
P. del Rosario St., Cebu City
Telephone 221000 local 207
Fax (63) (32) 217183

Mr. Dionisio C. Ledres Jr.
Senior Economic Development Specialist
National Economic and Development Authority-VII
Leonisa Bldg., Escario St., Cebu City
Telephone (032) 218-126/222-492
Fax (032) 210-489

Dr. Juanita Manalo
Liaison Officer UN Volunteer
Lingkod Tao Kalikasan
2470 Del Carmen St., Makati, Metro Manila
Telephone 591-185
Fax 590-125

Mr. Jaime Mata
Planning Officer IV
Planning Service and Programming Division
Department of Agrarian Reform
Elliptical Road, Diliman, Quezon City
Telephone 961-659
Fax 961-652

Engr. Edgar M. Molintas
Technical Division Head
Benguet State University - Affiliated Noncon Energy Center
La Trinidad, Benguet

Mr. Isabelo Montejo
Provincial Environment & Natural Resources Officer
Department of Environment and Natural Resources
New Capitol Site, Tagbilaran City
Telephone 411-2278

Mr. Petronilo Muhez
Senior Forester
National Forestry Development Office
Department of Environment and Natural Resources
Visayas Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City
Telephone 965176
Fax 965176

Mr. Casimiro V. Olvida
Chief Information Technology Unit
University of the Philippines at Los Banos Forestry
Development Center
UPLB College of Forestry, College 4031 Laguna
Telephone 2341
Fax 3206/3340
Email: CVO@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph

Mr. Protacio Oroq
Forester III, Provincial Environment and Natural, Resources Office
Department of Environment and Natural Resources
C-1@3rd/F Gotiaoco Bldg. MC Briones St. Cebu City
Telephone 929-59/91927/92806

Mr. Simeon Porio
Former Barangay Captain
Farmers' Group
Panalipan, Catmon Cebu

Mr. Alex H. Rayos
Sr. Science Research Specialist
Environmental Protection & Monitoring Division
Department of Energy
PNPC Complex, Merritt Rd., Fort Bonifacio,
Makati Metro Manila
Telephone 844-10-21 to 31 loc. 303,367

Dr. Wellington Rosacia
Senior Science Research Specialist
Ecosystem Research & Devt. Bureau
Department of Environment and Natural Resources
College, Laguna
Telephone 3320,3481,2229,2269

Ms. Charito Sanchez
Assistant Statistician
National Statistics Office - VII
Capuras Bldg., Sancianco St., Cebu City
Telephone 902-59
Fax 219-494

Ms. Lorenza Umali
Senior Planning Officer
National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women
1145 J.P. Laurel St., San Miguel, Manila
Telephone 7417313
Fax 7125267

Mr. Alejandro Villamor
Project Manager
Xavier University - Affiliated Noncon Energy Center
Cagayan de Oro City
Telephone 724-096/725117
Fax (08822) 722994

Resource Speakers

Ms. Felicisima V. Arriola
Senior Science Research Specialist
Non-Conventional Energy Division
Department of Energy
Merritt Rd. Fort Bonifacio, Makati, Metro Manila
Telephone 818-8614
Fax 818-8614

Ms. Ma. Eloida. Balamiento
Chief, Non-conventional Energy Division
Department of Energy
Merritt Road, Fort Bonifacio, Makati, Metro Manila
Telephone 844-1021 to 31,
Fax 818-8614

Ms. Ruby T. Buen
Development Management Officer
Planning and Policy Studies Office
Department of Environment and Natural Resources
Visayas Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City
Telephone 951761/997327
Fax 95-17-61

Ms. Lilian C. Fernandez
Division Chief
Program Planning & Coordination
Department of Energy Planning & Monitoring Bureau
Merritt Rd., Fort Bonifacio, Makati Metro Manila
Telephone 843-63-98/844-10-21 loc. 259
Fax 843-63-98

Engr. Reuben T. Quejas
Chief, Rural Energy Program Management Section
Non-conventional Energy Division
Department of Energy
Fort Bonifacio, Makati Metro Manila
Telephone 818-86-14
Fax 818-86-14

Dr. Sofio Quintana
Planning & Project Mgt. Services Division Chief
Forest Management Bureau
Department of Environment and Natural Resources
Visayas Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City
Telephone 986-217

Ms. Elizabeth Remedio
Project Manager
University of San Carlos - Affiliated Noncon Energy Center
P. del Rosario St., Cebu City
Telephone 211-000 loc 207
Fax (63) (32) 217183

Mr. Alejandrino Sibucao Jr.
OIC, Economic Analysis Section
Forest Management Bureau
Department of Environment and Natural Resources
Visayas Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City
Telephone 962-141
Fax 962-141

Secretariat

Mr. Genesis Agravante
Science Research Assistant
University of San Carlos, Affiliated Noncon Energy Center
P. Del Rosario St., Cebu City
Telephone 211-000 loc. (207)
Fax (63) (32) 217183

Mr. Ricardo De la Cruz
Science Research Specialist II
Non-conventional Energy Division,
Department of Energy
157 A. Mabini St., Sulucan, Bocaue, Bulacan
Telephone 818-86-14
Fax 818-86-14

Mr. Mark Gainallo
Science Research Assistant
University of San Carlos, Affiliated Noncon Energy Center
P. del Rosario St., Cebu City
Telephone 211-000 loc. (207)
Fax (63) (32) 217183

Mr. Sofronio Masapequefia
Science Research Assistant
University of San Carlos Affiliated Noncon Energy Center
P. del Rosario St., Cebu City
Telephone 211-000 loc. (207)
Fax (63) (32) 217183

Ms. Genie Matildo
Science Research Assistant
University of San Carlos Affiliated Noncon Energy Center
P. del Rosario St., Cebu City
Telephone 211-000 loc. (207)
Fax (63) (32) 217183

Ms. Cerelita Ucat
Science Research Assistant
University of San Carlos Affiliated Noncon Energy Center
P. del Rosario St., Cebu City
Telephone 211-000 loc. (207)
Fax (63) (32) 217183

Appendix 2: Detailed program of the seminar/ workshop

DAY 1 - a.m.:





PART 1 - OPENING CEREMONIES

8:00-9:00 am

Welcome Ceremonies Rationale and Introduction of Participants


PART 2 - SEMINAR

9:30-10:00 am

Audio-Visual Presentation: Cebu Fuelwood Study (USC)


Open Forum

10:00-12:00 am

Session 1 - Wood Energy Situation


Paper Presentations:


1. HECS Study - Household Energy Demand Survey (DEA)


2. HECS Study - Urban Wood Fuel System Studies (DEA)


Open Forum



DAY 1 - p.m.:




1:00-2:00 p. m.

Continuation of Session 1: Wood Energy Situation Paper Presentations:


3. Fuelwood Consumption Survey of Business Establishments (FMB)


4. Cebu Wood Fuel Studies (USC)

2:30-4:00 p.m.

Panel Discussions - reactions from:


- wood fuel producers (NGOs: CPAR or KMKP)


- planning bodies (GOs: NEDA, DENR, or DA)


- users (NGOs: AGTALON or SIBAT)


- environment (GOs/NGOs: EMB, PEAN, PFEC, or Green Forum)


Open Forum



DAY 2-a.m.:




8:00-9:00 am

Session 2 - Policies and Strategies


Paper Presentations:


1. Non-Conventional Energy Program (DEA)


2. National Forestry Master Plan (FIVIB)


3. The DAP Study - Towards a National Fuelwood Policy (DAP)

9:30-12:00 am

Panel Discussions - reactions from:


- planning bodies (GOs: NEDA or DA)


- producers (NGOs: CPAR or KMKP)


- legislature (GOs: Senate or House energy committees)


- environment (GOs/NGOs: EMB, PEAN, PFEC, or Green Forum)



DAY 2 - p.m.:




1:00-2:00 p.m.

Session 3 - Issues for Strengthening Wood Energy Program Presentation: "Working Paper for Identifying Recommendations and Priorities for Wood Energy Development" (prepared by NWEWG & RWEDP):


- Policy Actions


- Wood Energy Data and Planning Capabilities


- Organizational and Institutional Aspects


Open Forum


PART 3 - WORKSHOP

2:30-4:00 p.m.

Session 4 - Identifications of Recommendations and Priorities


Group Discussions:


Group 1: Policy Actions


Group 2: Enhancing Wood Energy Data Base & Planning Capabilities


Group 3: Strengthening Organizational & Institutional Structures



DAY 3 - a.m. to p.m.:





FIELD TRIP


- Wood Production Site


- Fuelwood/Charcoal Production Site


- Woodfuel-Using Enterprise/s



DAY 4 - am:




8:00-12:00 a.m.

Continuation of Session 4: Group Discussions



DAY 4 - p.m.:




1.00-2:00 p.m.

Session 5 - Presentation of Results and Conclusions

2:30-3:30 p.m.

Session 6 - Closing Ceremonies

Appendix 3: Details of the group discussions

Workshop Groupings: The seven working groups are:

Group 1A: Policy Actions: Wood Energy Production Flows (National Level)

P. Muñez: Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR)
S. Quintana: DENR-Forest Management Bureau (FMB)
R. Villa: Department of Agriculture
E. Cortez: House of Representative
J. Mata: Department of Agrarian Reform
Rapporteur: R.V. Liganor

Group 1B. Policy Actions: Wood Energy Users (National Level)

E. Aquino: Office of Senator Tatad
L. Umali: National Commission on the Role of Women
P. de Castro: Department of Education, Culture and Sports
S. Koffa: International Institute of Rural Reconstruction
A. Sibucao: DENR-FMB
A. Rayos: Department of Energy - Environmental Management Division
Rapporteur: F. V. Arriola

Group 2. Enhancing Wood Energy Database (National Level)

J. Manalo: Lingkod Tao Kalikasan
C. Olvida: UPLB-Forestry Development Center
W. Rosacia: DENR-Ecosystems Research Development Bureau
L. Fernandez: DOE-Program Policy Coordination Division
B. Bisana: DOST-Forest Products Research Development Institute
Rapporteur: R. T. Quejas

Group 3. Organization Structure on Wood Energy Development and Management

F. Flauta: DA
M. Balamiento: DOE-Non-Conventional Energy Division
A. Pagkalinawan: National Economic Development Authority
R. Buen: DENR-Planning and Policy Studies Office
R. Branzuela:
Rapporteur: R. G. dela Cruz

Group 4A. Policy Actions: Wood Energy Production/Flow (Regional Level)

E. Remedio: University of San Carlos - ANEC
D. Ledres: NEDA - Region VII
T. Redulla: DENR - Region VII
M. Hermoso: DA - Region VII
C. Laplap: DOE - Visayas Field Office
Rapporteur: M. G. Lilang

Group 4B. Policy Actions: Wood Energy Users (Regional Level)

S. Foronda: Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources
R. Bareng: Mariano Marcos State University - ANEC
A. Labios: DOE - Visayas Field Office
I. Montejo: DENR - Region VII
E. Ybanez: DA - Region VII
Rapporteur: S. C. Cahig

Group 5. Enhancing Wood Energy Database (Regional Level)

A. Villamor: Xavier University - ANEC
I. Labus: USC - ANEC
P. Orog: DENR - Region VII
C. Sanchez: National Statistics Office - Region VII
E. Molintas: Benguet State University - ANEC
Rapporteur: F. M. Largo

Group 1A: Policy Actions: Wood Energy Production and Flows (National Level)

This group was charged with the task of discussing woodfuel production and marketing issues and constraints and formulating recommendations

Regarding wood production, the group considered forests/timber lands and agricultural tracts as the main sources of woodfuel production. The people producing woodfuel have been affiliated with or have been under the various programs of the Department of Environment and National Resources for the rehabilitation of degraded forest/timberlands. These programs are:

a. Integrated Social Forestry (ISF) - Where the upland dwellers are given the certificate of stewardship contract (CSC) for 25 years receivable for another 25 years. The individual families occupying at least 1 to 3 hectares are asked to develop these lands in order to become self-sufficient in food and other family needs. At least 20 % of the land under the CSC must be devoted to agroforestry of timber plant action.

b. Community Forestry Program (CFP) - Is a program where a 25-year Community-Based Forest Management Agreement (CBFMA) is given to Organized Communities by the NGO Community Organizer (CO) to develop at least 1,000 hectares of timberlands. The components for development to be undertaken in the area are Reforestation, Timber Stand Improvement (TSI), Assisted Natural Regeneration (ANR).

c. Forest Land Management Agreement (FLMA) - Another instrument given to Organized Communities to undertake the maintenance and protection of established plantations funded under Loan I obtained from ADB and OECF. The areas vary from 1 to 3,000 ha. Families participate in these activities.

d. Community-Based Forest Management Agreement (CBFMA) - A 25-year instrument given to Organized Communities by NGO Community Organizers to develop Community Forest Management Projects. Funding comes from the Loan II obtained by the government from ADB and OECF. Under this second loan the project areas/sites are subject to a system of appraisal in which "the Financial and Economic Liabilities are 11% and 14% for FIRR".

e. Integrated Forest Management Agreement (IFMA) - Is another 25-year instrument given to qualified applicants to allow them to develop and manage degraded lands and degraded lands with residual forests. Funding however for this project must be sourced from other financial institutions by the beneficiaries. Beneficiaries include indigenuous peoples (IPs). The areas of timberland to be developed are at least 500 to 40,000 ha. In the case of CADC/CALC the area may be as large as 55,000 ha.

The issues, constraints and corresponding recommendations identified by this group are clearly stated in the attached table 1a.

The group did not suggest a specific range of capability measures for a fuelwood project. Its financial and economic appraisal of DENR Community Forest Management Project is for timber species and nurse tree species in combination with agricultural crops.

Regarding the woodfuel flows both within rural areas and from rural areas to urban centers, both should be effectively and accurately monitored by the community organizer/ the beneficiaries themselves and the Multi-sectoral Forest Protection Community (MSFPC) when such sectors have been institutionalized.

Table 1a. Results of Group 1a Discussions


Issues

Constraints

Recommendations

I. Woodfuel Production
- forest lands
- agricultural lands

· ISF devolved to LGUs
· CFP
· DBFWA/FLMA
· IFMA (IPs, coops, TLA holders)
· open access to fuelwood gathering
· terminal arrangement for occupants in IPAs

· no financing/access to financial institutions
· some existing institutions(NGOs) are not responsive to needs of the beneficiaries
· present scenario does not allow utilization of mangrove species

· extend government subsidy
· seed fund from GFIs
· lend/extend at low interest
· strictly assess performance
· exempt from the payment of forest charges
· review existing policy to suit the needs of times
· come up with appropriate TA

II. Woodfuel Flows
- within rural areas
- from rural areas to urban centers

· issuance of CADC, CALC
· OMA, ONCC/OSCC
· Financial viability of fuelwood plantation

· very slow issuance
· no funds
· OMA is given priority on fund utilization; ONCC/ OSCC are left out
· viability not established

· streamline procedures
· source out/augment funding
· abolish ONCC/OSCC, retain OMA
· create a commission
· subject to study taking into consideration:

- proper choice of species
- adaptation of cost-effective technologies
- determination of appropriate rotation
-institutionalize CBFMA and MFPD down to the municipal/barangay level

Other Recommendations:

· rationalize the fuelwood plan within the context of the national forestation program.
· advocate for the passage of a non-conventional energy bill.

Group 1B: Policy Actions: Wood Energy Users (National Level)

This group was charged with the task of discussing the issues and constraints and formulating recommendations relating to wood energy use in households and business establishments, in the national context. Table 1b gives a summary of the results of their discussions.

Table 1b. Results of Group 1b Discussions

Issues/Constraints

Policy Actions

Fuelwood scarcity

establish family woodlots/ community fuelwood plantations where necessary; support R&D activities geared towards identifying biomass-based resources; that may be tapped as substitute for fuelwood resources develop and enhance efficient utilization of fuelwood-fed devices through training & education strengthen community-based organization/ households towards employing agroforestry, community forestry practices as approaches to biomass-based management to meet fuelwood/and related needs

Health related problems

intensify effective info. Dissemination & technological research and development related to fuelwood consumption activities for improved cookstoves and wood energy conversion devices (incorporation of safety features)

Gender issues

ensure women's participation in planning, implementation and monitoring of fuelwood-related projects' design methodologies to analyze male-female activities that are related to fuelwood management

Accessibility

develop clear effective and efficient policy in land tenurial issues and programs; accelerate the efficient and effective implementation of existing policies on tenurial arrangement (e.g., ISF, CARP. Etc)

Inefficient wood energy

develop and disseminate efficient wood energy conversion devices and conversion and consumption processes

Lack of technical knowledge

formulate area-based training projects

Consumption devices

institute area-based and people specific technological and socio-economic research on fuelwood conversion devices

Group 2. Enhancing Wood Energy Database (National Level)

This group was charged with the task of discussing the issues and constraints and formulating recommendations relating to wood energy data management and methodologies.

The group tackled three aspects as follows:

· Issues/constraints and recommendations
· Issues and recommendations on energy use were formulated based mainly on the situations presented by the resource persons and participants The results of the discussions are reflected in table 2.

Table 2. Results of Group 2 Discussions

Issues

Recommendations

1. Inconsistency of existing data (e.g. area, volume species, frequency of cutting, cutting of height)

Review of existing data by NWEWG.

2. No standard units of measurements (in terms of volume/weight) for fuelwood reporting

Set standard units to correct inconsistencies.

3. Varied parameters and methodologies used in the conduct and processing of surveys

Adopt uniform parameters and standardize methodologies used for the conduct of energy surveys and the processing of survey data.

4. Delivery of information is inefficient

Institutionalize mechanisms for efficient delivery of information.

5. Insufficient funds intended for fuelwood studies

Integrate approach by involving other agencies.

Cebu Case 6. Lack of technical know-how on policy production

Conduct site specific training.

7 Not enough technical group members to implement the project needs in the ANECs

Form multi-disciplinary technical group to serve as overseer.

· Database Project Components

All information on fuelwood and related areas of concern (especially R&D results) will be collected/gathered from the different government and non-government agencies/entities. Such information will be stored through state-of-the-art electronic data communication systems and will be reviewed and scrutinized by the NWEWG. This will be done to determine mature, scientifically proven technologies as well as to identify the R&D gaps. The mature technologies will be considered either for verification and/or dissemination, while the R&D gaps will be noted for future R&D undertakings.

· Development of Manpower Capability

Again, based on the topics presented, reacted to and agreed upon by the observation on Cebu case, the group strongly recommends that a series of education campaigns and an information drive are deemed necessary. In particular, in situ and ex situ training will play an important role in strengthening the manpower capabilities of the concerned people including the NWWEG, ANECS, producers and traders. Aside from the attached training needs (see table below), the group also considered most of the areas exemplified in Ms. Balamiento's report/proposal.

Training Needs

Type of Training

Producer - Trader Training

- Production technology
- Role of women
- Cooperative training approach
- Project management
- Energy conservation (for households sustainable development)

Database development

- Establishment of data network stations (e.g., electronic data communication system)

Group 3: Organizational Structure on the Wood Energy Development and Management

This group was charged with the task of discussing the issues and constraints and formulating recommendations relating to the organization and management of wood energy development.

Issue

· The current ad hoc status of the institutional body that facilitates and coordinates wood energy development and management activities in the Philippines should be discontinued and a permanent coordinating body should be established.

Recommendations

· The DOE-NCED and the National Wood Energy Working Group should prepare and draft an Executive Order creating a national wood energy coordinating body/unit. Presidential approval of the Executive Order after submission to the Executive Office by the DOE-NCED & NWEWG will then provide the legal framework for coordinating and giving direction to all wood energy development and management plans, programs and projects.

· All government agencies/departments and NGOs concerned with wood energy should create an internal coordinating unit to simplify and streamline all related activities.

- Prepare/Draft an Executive Order creating a national wood energy coordinating body.

- Establish a legal framework for coordinating and giving direction to all plans, programs, projects related to wood energy development and management.

- Each government agency/department and NGOs concerned would have to create a coordinating body/ unit

- Accredit NGOs
- Disseminate information
- Develop manpower
- Organize NAC and NWEWG

· The legislated national coordinating body/unit will set the implementing rules and regulations/guidelines for the accreditation of participating NGOs both newly established and those with a performance record of developing & managing wood energy projects to encourage a more extensive temporal & spatial coverage.

· Information dissemination will principally be handled by the national coordinating unit with respect to the media but every unit involving both GOs and NGOs will be responsible for the smooth flow of information on wood energy both to the national coordinating unit, local/regional media and particularly for the internal information flow. Ideas and concerns of wood energy procedures/gatherings/traders/users should be ventilated through frontline units like the NGOs, DOE Regional Offices, and academe where desk personnel should be assigned to this matter.

· Manpower development needs will be affected by the interactive cooperation of all the actors/ players both institutional/individual. The grassroots workforce must be strengthened first and foremost so that their inputs will be included in the policy/strategy formulation.

· Reorganization of the NAC (National Advisory Council) to include NEDA and DOST representation will reinforce its project/program prioritization, evaluation and monitoring. Gender concerns will be partially addressed by including NCRFW in the NWEWG but children and other unrepresented groups will have to be considered also. The technical working group will be an ad hoc body composed of personnel constituted on an on-call basis depending on the need.

Group 4: Policy Actions (Regional Level)

This group was charged with the task of discussing the issues and constraints and formulating recommendations relating to wood energy production and marketing in the regional context. The results of their discussions are shown in table 4a:

Table 4a. Results of Group 4 (Regional Level) Discussions

Issues

Recommendations

1. Financing scheme for woodlot/treefarms development is either not available or is unknown to beneficiaries

- Consistency loans/straight grants should be provided under the CVRP-II project. This is World Bank supported (both for A&D and CSC covered areas)

- Pledging session (similar to the PAP) of financial institutes and individuals to generate initial funds for farm development

- Disseminate and make known that the ISF, IFMA and CREP/FLMA have built in provision for tree farms and wood lot development

2. Restriction under the NIPAS law

- Make an inventory of areas developed prior to NIPAS law with the end view of requesting their exemption

- Appropriate tenurial investment to be developed for these areas and expanded to include tax declaration

- Continue honoring tenurial instruments issued prior to NIPAS law

3. Need to delineate NIPAS and non-NIPAS areas

- Review the delineations made and carry out zoning for specific purposes

- Issue the appropriate tenurial instruments for zones approved for development

4. Increasing production areas for fuelwood is restricted by the CARL

- Disseminate information about a law exempting the tree .farm from the CARL; approved in 1994

- Continue the contract reforestation activities with communities (these were initially done under World Bank supported projects)

Insufficiency of production models in tree farming and agroforestry to fit different situations or to facilitate integration into farming systems

- A computer software design group at PCARRD should be linked to a Washington DC group to facilitate their activities

6. Need to devolve activities

- LGU should be given the authority to issue permits to cut the ISF area and collect appropriate tax

- Supporting budget of devolved activities should likewise be devolved.

- Make representation to local politicians to accommodate and provide budget for devolved activities in their IRA.

7. Transport of fuelwood provides an opportunity for people in authority to harass traders and farmers

- Traders, etc. should avoid the "palusot" system and report abuses to superiors of erring government personnel for proper actions

- Rules for personnel at the check points of various institutions should be properly defined

8. Such information as "Who buys what, from where" is not available

- Institute an auction type of marketing for fuelwood

9. Continuing study on supply and demand

- Continue census done by ANEC annually

- Do a census of planters in fuelwood producing barangays

- Create composite team to monitor energy-related and marketing system

Group 4: Policy Actions (Region VII)

This group was charged with the task of discussing the issues and constraints and formulating recommendations relating to wood energy usage in the regional context. The results are presented in table 4b.

Table 4b. Results of Group 4 (Region VII) Discussions

Issues

Recommendations

1. Need to standardize woodfuel in terms of size. weight and species for the different end-uses

- Look into the possibilities of standardization using the current system of DENR and DTI as benchmark

2. Ban on the use of woodfuel (particularly in Cebu City)

- Policy makers and LGUs to be informed about research findings

3. Availability and affordability of efficient cookstoves and other woodfuel-fed devices

- Promote improved cookstove program

- Provide incentives to manufacturers of cookstoves

- Develop and disseminate improved cookstoves with higher heat conversion efficiencies

Group 5: Enhancing Wood Energy Database Planning Capabilities and Organizational Structure

This group was charged with the task of discussing the issues and constraints and formulating recommendations relating to wood energy data management and methodologies.

Group 5 identified various issues regarding database enhancement. As observed, there are data discrepancies due to the lack of a common methodology to conduct research and studies. Standard operating procedures should be formulated by NSO and adopted by concerned agencies and other organizations. The lack of information dissemination between concerned agencies and end users also contributes to data discrepancies.

Another issue identified is the lack of promotion and commercialization of fuelwood in relation to other sources of energy. Utilization of ANEC for this matter is needed together with research-related NGOs and government agencies. ANEC can also be tapped to increase research coordination, especially regarding efforts to find a solution to the problem of insufficient and outdated data.

The lack of equipment such as computer units is one reason for the problem of data storage and lack of easy data access, therefore funding institutions should provide such equipment.

Regarding the organizational structure, the overlapping of mandates of different agencies/organizations is one issue that needs to be addressed. Proper delineation of specific organizations must be done with ANEC as the coordinating agency in order to come up with better fuelwood resource management and development policies.

Possible Database Research Areas:

Areas

Possible Information Sources

Supply and production

NAMRIA, DENR, NGOs, LGUs, DA

Collection and gathering

Primary data gathering, DENR

Legal aspects

DENR

Area classification (e.g., topography, demographics)

DENR, DA, concerned agencies

Wood species

DENR, DA

Infrastructure

LGUs, DPWH, PPDO, DENR, DOTC

Database Enhancement

Issues

Recommendations

Lack of common methodology

- Formulation of standard procedures by NSO
- Coordination with concerned agencies

Lack of information dissemination between Concerned agencies and end-users

- Utilization of ANECs as coordinating bodies

Lack of promotion and commercialization

- ANEC utilization
- Regional line agencies, LGUs, NGOs

Insufficient and outdated data

- Increased research and coordination efforts by ANECs

Lack of support services

- Increased coordination efforts

Lack of equipment

- Financial support from DOE/funding sources to acquire equipment

Physical and spatial constraints

- Improved coordination and funding

Accessibility of information sources

- Provision of coordination and support services

Organizational Structure

Issues

Recommendations

Overlapping mandates

- Coordination and delineation of specific functions
- ANEC as coordinating agency

Lack of coordination

- Coordination by ANECs
- Coordination with national level agencies

Appendix 4: Participants' impressions

Dr. Pongpisit Viseshakul of Thailand's National Energy Policy Office commented that the participants were very close to achieving real understanding and organization of issues and policies. Citing the case of Thailand where energy policies were previously not well-defined and implemented because of political instability and unclear organization, the importance of effective decision making was very much emphasized. The need for technical persons well versed in policy problems to head the relevant offices was also pointed out. Concrete policy actions especially on funding of activities should be made.

Mr. Le Huy Dat of Vietnam was impressed on the presence of many organizations and institutions in the seminar. He also voiced the need for the implementation of activities identified and cooperation among various institutions and countries.

Mr. Sri Herwanto of Indonesia found the seminar workshop to be very interesting. Active participation of participants from various sectors was cited as very impressive. A similar seminar in Indonesia was proposed.

Engr. Rudy Bareng of MMSU-ANEC cited the role of the seminar in clarifying several wood energy issues and raising new ones. The numerous problems and issues, including socio-economic implications, in the sector only point to the numerous concerns in the sector, this is also indicated by the many agencies and organizations involved. The plans and ideas identified could help in the development of the sector. The people in ANECs are eager to fulfill their roles as key agencies.

Mr. Simeon Porio, the representative of woodfuel traders expressed his appreciation for being able to participate in the gathering. The papers were well presented and very clear. He hoped to share what he had learned with his fellow farmers. The field trip was a wonderful experience. The need for implementation by the relevant government agencies was highlighted.

Dr. Juanita Manalo of Lingkod Tao Kalikasan, representing the private sector, expressed appreciation for being able to participate in an enlightened discussion of intellectuals and experts involving relevant issues. The seminar was seen as a chance to clarify issues and learn new things about the sector. The field trip revealed a re-greening industry in the economy. The workshop also enhanced abilities to participate and contribute.

Mr. Jaime Mata, representing the government sector, was reasonably impressed with the management and organization of the seminar from the accommodation to the discussions. Only the aspect of time management gave an unfavourable impression. He emphasised the need to strictly follow schedules. The resource speakers were very good. The materials and visual aids were done well. Expectations about the need to update data were expressed. The panelists were articulate and very precise in their comments. Active participation by the participants themselves also contributed greatly to the success of the seminar. Greater participation from the private sector could have added to a more enlightened discussion. Paper presentations would have been more informative and interesting if the presenters expounded more on their topics including actual field experiences. The seminars could also be duplicated at the regional level where the action is. Legislative support was cited as necessary for effective policy formulation and implementation.

Ms. Emilar Aquino, of the Office of Senator Tatad, gave a primer on the status of two non-conventional energy bills in the Senate. Unfortunately, these have been shelved. The seminar, however, brought to the fore the need to seriously consider the issues that these bills address.

Appendix 5: Field trip

The field trip was designed to enable the participants to have hands on observation of the different tree plantations in some towns of Cebu province. The trip gave an opportunity to the participants to observe existing woodfuel stocks and trade practices in Cebu.

The first stop was Naga, a southern town located 20 kilometers from Cebu City. The participants were brought to Barangay Naalad where existing tobacco plantations intercropped with ipil-ipil plants can be seen. The intercropping served not only to prevent erosion of the hills which were planted with tobacco but also gave additional incomes to the farmers when the ipil-ipil trees were coppiced for firewood which was sold in Cebu City.

From Naga, the participants were brought to the Cebu hilly lands. The hilly lands refer to the upland barangays of Cebu City where cut flowers and mangoes are commercially grown. The participants were surprised to see mango trees, the fruits of which were wrapped with newspapers to preserve them from insect infestation. Mangoes were planted in hilly lands not only to prevent erosion of the hills but also as a good source of income for the residents.

After the tour at Cebu City's hillylands, the participants were brought to Compostela where they saw five hectares of ipil-ipil plantation owned by the mayor of the town. The participants also met one of the fuelwood traders in the area. They saw bundles of fuelwood ready for transport to Cebu City. From Compostela, the ride to the next destination enabled the participants to see patches of fuelwood plantations along the highway.

Catmon was the next stop of the tour. Before being taken to another fuelwood plantation, the participants were brought to Monte Carlo, a newly developed beach resort in Catmon, where they enjoyed a sumptuous packed lunch and the clear waters.

After an hour's rest, the participants were brought to Panalipan, another upland barangay in Catmon to see the fuelwood farm of Mr. Simeon Porio, a local fuelwood plantation owner and trader. Mr. Porio was invited to join the seminar so that he, as an experienced fuelwood trader, could provide inputs for the formulation of a national woodfuel policy for the region and the entire country. He guided his fellow participants in walking uphill to his residence where piles of fuelwood and coconut bundles were stored for delivery to Cebu City.

Aside from the ipil-ipil plantations and stocks of fuelwood, the participants also saw a native copra dryer which was fired by coconut husks. The laborious hike to Mr. Porio's residence was well compensated for by lots of sweet coconut juice provided by Mr. Porio.

When the participants felt they had seen enough fuelwood plantations and stocks of bundled ipil-ipil and cocofronds, they were taken to Alenter Cane. This is one of the largest rattan furniture exporters in Mandaue City. This company uses a fuelwood boiler to heat the rattan poles so that they can be bent into several styles of furniture. After inspecting the boiler and the wood wastes which were used to fire it, the participants were given a tour of the showroom of furniture for export by Mr. Ponce, the company manager.

From Mandaue City, the seminar participants were given time to shop for local products in Cebu City before they were taken back safely to the hotel.

At the end of the day, the seminar organizers felt that the objective of touring the participants to see the system of fuelwood plantations in the towns of Cebu, their transport and use in the industry, had been accomplished.


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