THE GLOBAL CASSAVA DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

Cassava for livestock feed in sub-Saharan Africa

Olumide O. Tewe
University of Ibadan, Nigeria

Coordinated for FAO
by
NeBambi Lutaladio

Agricultural Officer (roots and tubers)
Horticultural Crops Group
Crop and Grassland Service
Plant Production and Protection Division

INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS
Rome, 2004

Table of Contents


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© FAO and IFAD 2004


Table of Contents

FOREWORD

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

1. INTRODUCTION

2. AN OVERVIEW OF CASSAVA IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

2.1 Cassava properties
2.2 Nutritional profile
2.3 Toxic factors in cassava
2.4 Production levels in the various regions of Africa
2.5 Potential for use of cassava as animal feed in Africa

3. LIVESTOCK SYSTEMS IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

3.1 Production pattern
3.2 Productivity
3.3 Marketing
3.4 Livestock feeding
3.5 Livestock diseases

4. INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT FOR THE LIVESTOCK SECTOR

4.1 Government and non-governmental
4.2 Research centres and universities

5. CURRENT AND EMERGING TRENDS IN THE LIVESTOCK FEEDING SECTOR

5.1 West Africa
5.2 East Africa
5.3 Central Africa
5.4 South Africa

6. USE OF CASSAVA IN LIVESTOCK FEEDING IN WEST, EASTERN, CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN AFRICA

6.1 Historical perspectives, research and development activities
6.2 Production utilization pattern of usage in traditional and commercial settings
6.3 Use of cassava as animal feed to enhance food security

7. STRATEGIC INTERVENTIONS FOR CASSAVA IN LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION IN WESTERN, EASTERN, CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN AFRICA

7.1 Identification of gaps, opportunities and constraints
7.2 Practical cassava-based feed formulations

8. FEASIBILITY OF USING CASSAVA VERSUS MAIZE OR WHEAT

8.1 Cassava as partial or total substitute for other energy sources
8.2 Satisfactory levels of cassava in relative feed rations for poultry, pigs and ruminants
8.3 Price relationship between cassava, maize, other cereal substitutes, soybean meal and other protein supplements

9. FUTURE PERSPECTIVES AND ACTION AREAS TO ENHANCE THE USE OF CASSAVA IN LIVESTOCK FEEDING

9.1 Feed management systems
9.2 Processing and utilization
9.3 Marketing of feed and livestock products
9.4 Policy issues
9.5 Capacity building
9.6 Environmental considerations
9.7 Issues for further research and development
9.8 Enhancement of food security

10. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

LIST OF REFERENCES

BACK COVER