Table of ContentsNext Page


Committee for Inland Fisheries of Africa, Report of the Tenth Session of the Sub-Committee for Lake Tanganyika, Lusaka, Zambia, 28-31 October 2003


PREPARATION OF THIS DOCUMENT

This is the final version of the report approved in Lusaka, Zambia, on 31 October 2003, by the tenth session of the Committee for Inland Fisheries of Africa Sub-Committee for Lake Tanganyika.

Distribution:

Members of CIFA/Membres du CPCA

Participants in the Session/Participants à la session

Other interested nations and international organizations/Autres Etats et organisations internationales intéressés

FAO Fisheries Department/Département des pêches de la FAO

Fisheries Officers in FAO Regional Offices/Fonctionnaires des pêches des Bureaux régionaux de la FAO

OPENING OF THE SESSION

1. The Tenth Session of the Sub-Committee for Lake Tanganyika of the Committee for Inland Fisheries of Africa (CIFA) was held from 28 to 31 October 2003 in Lusaka, Republic of Zambia. The Session was attended by representatives from the four member countries of the Sub-Committee: Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, United Republic of Tanzania and Zambia, as well as observers from the African Development Bank (AfDB), the Global Environmental Facility (GEF), the University of Kuopio in Finland and the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA). The Food and Agriculture Organization organized the meeting. The list of participants is given in Appendix B.

2. The Deputy Director of Fisheries Extension, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives, Mr Charles Maguswi, welcomed the participants with introductory remarks. He emphasized that the presence of representatives of the four riparian countries and the international community in Lusaka was a clear indication of the importance of Lake Tanganyika as a special regional and global asset.

3. The Chairman of the Sub-Committee, Mr John Bayona, welcomed the participants on behalf of the collaborating States and stakeholders in the development of fisheries of Lake Tanganyika. He commended the Government of the Republic of Zambia for accepting to host the Tenth Session of the Sub-Committee and FAO for organizing and facilitating the forum. The Sub-Committee was reminded of the urgent need for strengthening research.

4. The FAO Representative in Zambia, Mr Dong Qingsong, thanked the Government of the Republic of Zambia for hosting the Session and conveyed greetings from the Director-General of FAO, Mr Jacques Diouf, the Assistant Director-General of the FAO Fisheries Department, Mr I. Nomura, and the FAO Subregional Representative for Southern and Eastern Africa, Ms V. Sekitoleko. He informed members of the Sub-Committee that FAO attaches great importance to Lake Tanganyika fisheries resources, which are central to the livelihood of the people of the riparian countries.

5. The Sub-Committee was informed that FAO was aware that the riparian countries of Lake Tanganyika have insufficient financial means and human resources for monitoring, control and surveillance of fishing around Lake Tanganyika. The fish stocks are declining due to illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing.

6. The FAO Representative encouraged member countries to implement the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries (CCRF), which is an essential framework for managing and monitoring fisheries.

7. The Tenth Session was opened by the Honourable Mundia Sikatana, Member of Parliament, Minister of Agriculture and Cooperatives in the company of the Permanent Secretary Dr N.J. Kwendakwema. He informed the members of the Sub-Committee that although the Lake is of global value and of great socio-economic importance at both national and global levels, the lake’s integrity is threatened by human activity.

8. The Minister emphasized that it is also important that the Lake is equitably utilized among the riparian States within their jurisdiction without necessarily causing harm to other beneficiary States. The Sub-Committee is a forum for a common understanding regarding sustainable management of the Lake fisheries. It was pointed out that the Government of Zambia is supportive of formal stakeholder participation in fisheries management. He informed the Sub-Committee that the Government is in the process of approving a revised Fisheries Act which had drawn a lot of inputs from various stakeholders.

9. The Honourable Minister recognized the effort of FAO which has been instrumental in establishing a framework for cooperation among the riparian States through the Sub-Committee. He commended the Government of Finland, the African Development Bank, the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the Global Environmental Facility for their financial support and for their presence at the Session.

10. The Minister concluded with hope that the deliberations of the Sub-Committee would be fruitful, based on common objectives, and with clear focus to the expectations of the riparian countries and the international community.

ELECTION OF CHAIRPERSON AND VICE-CHAIRPERSON

11. The Session unanimously elected Mr C. Maguswi, Deputy Director Extension, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives, Zambia as Chairman; and Mr R. Kanyaru, Director, Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture, Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock Farming, Burundi as Vice-Chairman.

ADOPTION OF THE AGENDA AND ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE SESSION

12. The Agenda was amended and adopted as given in Appendix A. The documents presented at the Session are listed in Appendix C.

ACTION ON RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE NINTH SESSION OF THE SUB-COMMITTEE

13. This Agenda item was presented on the basis of document CIFA:DM/LT/03/2 highlighting what transpired at the Ninth Session in Dar-Es-Salaam (27-30 November 2001) and the decisions and recommendations made on the following:

a) status of national implementation of the monitoring phase of the Lake Tanganyika Fisheries Research Project;

b) Lake Tanganyika management issues;

c) review of preparatory work for a comprehensive project for Lake Tanganyika supported by GEF and AfDB;

d) and strengthening the future role of the Sub-Committee.

14. The Sub-Committee was invited to provide further suggestions and recommendations for more committed, determined and focused future follow-up actions on the above issues.

THE STATUS OF LAKE TANGANYIKA FISHERIES BY NATIONAL SECTORS

15. This Agenda item was presented under the document CIFA:DM/LT/03/3

Burundi

16. The Sub-Committee was informed of the following:

a) Pelagic stocks are fished at night by both artisanal and commercial fishers. The results of studies on the principal demographic parameters of the main pelagic species reveal that 63-89 percent of catches consist of S. tanganicae, L. stappersii and L. miodon. Most of the fishing techniques, which have been adopted, are based on attraction by means of light.

b) There are also threats to the diversity of non-cichlid fish posed by pollution, sedimentation and degradation of the habitats although fishing activities pose the greatest threat.

c) The human population living on the shores of the Lake uses the stocks of fish as a source of food. Population growth increases the pressure on the natural environment including the aquatic habitat.

17. Burundi highlighted several ongoing projects and national activities on Lake Tanganyika that are based on traditional technologies and require improvements. There are problems which include the following:

18. The Sub-Committee was informed of the following threats to the cichlids in Lake Tanganyika:

19. The Sub-Committee was informed of the following constraints to sustainable fisheries management in Burundi:

20. Members of the Sub-Committee were informed that Burundi is making an effort to implement measures to reduce illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and to control water pollution.

21. The Government is trying to work out mechanisms for transferring the management of the fishery resources to the local communities but it is constrained by lack of capacity to enforce legislation and the changing behaviour of fishers.

22. Members of the Sub-Committee were informed that, at national level, there is need for legislation to prohibit beach seines, limit the industrial fishing licences and revise the classification of simple small fishing units.

23. At regional level, it is necessary to develop management mechanisms and partnerships to strengthen legislation on: closed season, closed areas, fish quotas, minimum mesh size, control of lift nets and prohibition of beach seines.

Democratic Republic of the Congo

24. The Sub-Committee was informed that the fisheries sector of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has a major role to play in the national economy and contributes to the social well-being and food self-sufficiency of the country. Unfortunately, like many other sectors, it has been affected by country-wide civil disturbances, which have resulted in:

25. The delegation of DRC informed the Sub-Committee that the data for pelagic stocks within the Congolese jurisdiction was not up to date.

26. Concerning national and regional fishery programmes and projects, the Congolese sector has not benefited from these programmes due to recent political unrest.

27. Regarding the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries (CCRF), awareness has been raised among various fishery stakeholders around the country, but fishing communities under the Congolese jurisdiction of Lake Tanganyika have not benefited from this sensitization process.

28. With regards to environmental degradation the DRC has endorsed the objectives and activities of project RAF/92/G32 “pollution control and other measures aimed at protecting the biodiversity of Lake Tanganyika”. There is an environmental plan to protect biodiversity.

29. The Sub-Committee was informed on the status of legislation and regulations in the DRC. The fishery sector is currently governed by the very old royal decree of 21 April 1937 on hunting and fishing. Hence, there is a need for DRC to replace the 1937 Act and or Decree with a new fisheries Act that will facilitate harmonisation and standardising of legislation with other riparian States. Considering that the civil disturbances that have affected fishery activities have ended, the DRC asked the Secretariat of the Sub-Committee to assist in establishing a fishery diagnostic in the Congolese jurisdiction of Lake Tanganyika.

United Republic of Tanzania

30. The Sub-Committee was informed that fisheries research in Tanzania is mandated to the Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute (TAFIRI) to carry out all aspects of research. Current knowledge on the status of fish stocks has been facilitated by the following projects.

31. Concerning the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries Tanzania has, in the case of Lake Tanganyika, particularly complied with the following Articles:

a) Fisheries Management (Article 7)
b) Fisheries Operations (Article 8)
c) Fishery Post Harvest and Trade (Article 11) and
d) Fishery Research (Article 12).

s32. Regarding co-management, the Sub-Committee was informed that Tanzania has, among other things, given the Beach Management Units the following responsibilities:

33. The Tanzania delegation informed members of the Sub-Committee that Tanzania has taken the necessary steps to address illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing; environmental degradation; legislation and specific regulations for Lake Tanganyika.

34. Finally, Tanzania has identified the following management issues that require regional actions, namely:

Zambia

35. Zambia delegation outlined the main problems that constrain, fishery management and development on the Zambia sector of Lake Tanganyika, namely:

a) continuing decline of pelagic stocks;

b) use of inappropriate fishing methods;

c) inaccurate data especially in the artisanal fishery;

d) uncontrolled exploitation and trade of ornamental fish;

e) delays in approving the new Fisheries Act;

f) sedimentation resulting from uncontrolled settlements on the Lake shores as well as on the banks of the river mouths;

g) inadequate funds to conduct research programmes;

h) reduction in fish consumption levels due to decline in fish production;

i) lack of funds to support the introduction of appropriate fishing gear; and

j) inadequate control on the utilization of alien species.

36. The Sub-Committee was informed that in Zambia commercial fisheries activities are centered on both demersal and pelagic stocks (Lates, Limnothrissa and Stolothrissa); and the demersal inshore fish stocks comprising of more than 100 species.

37. Regarding regional programmes, there is CLIMLAKE, which deals with the early warning system to facilitate the management of pelagic species subsequently.

38. Concerning bilateral programmes Zambia is assisted by the following:

39. The Sub-Committee was also informed that national fisheries programmes include gillnets surveys, behavioural ecology, fisheries biology, fish conservation and co-management.

40. It was confirmed to the Sub-Committee that Zambia is among the FAO member countries, which adopted the CCRF and that also the application of fisheries co-management as a tool for sustainable fisheries management has been in place since 1998. The Draft Fisheries Act, which is in the process of being enacted, will go a long way to facilitate the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. Fisher’s livelihood is constrained by lack of a programme for financial assistance.

41. With regard to fisheries statistics and socio-economic data the Department of fisheries has been collecting data for the last 30 years, but the collections and compilation of data has increasingly been difficult due to lack of funds and human resources. Additionally, the information collected does not cover all fishing practices for example, angling.

42. Zambia is committed to the following: the control of illegal, unregulated and unreported fishing; reduction of environmental degradation; improvement of fisheries legislation against illegal fishing practices particularly the beach seines.

43. The Sub-Committee was informed of changing fisheries institutional and administrative arrangements as well as of fisheries extensions programmes between 1974 and 2003. These changes have posed problems of continuity and follow-up action for the last two decades.

44. Regarding fisheries policy the Sub-Committee learned that there has never been a fisheries policy, contrary to other natural resources sectors such as forestry and wild life and this has greatly constrained the development of the fisheries sector.

45. Members of the sub-committee took note of the possible solutions to the problems as highlighted by Zambia, viz:

a) Establish sustainable exploitation levels as recommended and limit fishing licences to levels that agree with the recommendation.

b) Strengthen the co-management structures and build stakeholders’ capacity to be able to capture accurate fishery statistics and data.

c) Ensure the passing of the draft fisheries policy by creating awareness on the importance of adopting it by various stakeholders for easy implementation of the fisheries management strategies.

d) Promotion of responsible aquaculture.

e) Promote partnerships in research so as to build the capacity of fisheries research institutions.

f) Build the capacity of fisheries department staff through appropriate training;

g) Impose a complete ban on the beach seine.

h) Control settlements along the lake shore.

i) Establish marine reserves.

j) Intensify the enforcement of the Fisheries Act.

k) Establish a credit facility for the artisanal fishery for the fishers to access appropriate fishing gear.

l) Establish a common legal framework for fishery activities for all riparian countries.

m) Establish an international management authority for Lake Tanganyika.

APPLICATION OF THE FAO CODE OF CONDUCT FOR RESPONSIBLE FISHERIES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF LAKE TANGANYIKA AND FOR THE CONTROL AND RESPONSIBLE USE OF ALIEN SPECIES IN THE LAKE BASIN

46. This Agenda item was introduced by the Secretariat on the basis of document CIFA:DM/LT/03/4.

Management of Lake Tanganyika

47. The Secretariat noted that policies for the management of the Lake’s aquatic resources will need to address social, ecological, economic, legal, and institutional aspects. Particular attention was drawn to the development of fishery co-management schemes. Management was moving away from open-access to fishery resources and towards licensing agreements and development of specific user-rights. This was necessary in light of the need to control and reduce fishing capacity in the Lake. Similarly, monitoring, control and surveillance (MCS) was pointed out as an essential component of effective fishery management.

48. The Secretariat further noted that creation and strengthening of appropriate legislation and of institutions will be necessary to support the developments in fishery co-management. Regional, state and local agencies will have an important role to play in responsible fisheries of the Lake. The Secretariat also noted the important role played by the Sub-Committee in encouraging developments in management, such as through adoption of the Regional Framework Fisheries Management Plan and facilitating operation of the Lake Tanganyika Fisheries Monitoring Programme.

49. The Sub-Committee acknowledged that institutional strengthening and harmonization of fishery policy are urgently needed in the Basin. Participatory approaches with fishing communities and other important stakeholders and rapid movement towards co-management (collaborative management) were stressed as being priority activities.

50. Fishing communities were identified as the key components of this process. Participatory diagnosis and analysis of community needs were required from the outset in order to move towards effective co-management. In order to empower more effectively these fishing communities, delegates noted that it will be necessary to give them legal status and to develop realistic terms of reference and jurisdiction. Means were needed to sustain them economically, such as, for example, through the collection of license fees.

51. The Sub-Committee further suggested improved standardization in monitoring, control and surveillance with regard to inspection of commercial and artisanal fishing boats, fish identification, traceability of fish products in order to help identify offenders, and penalties for offenders. One delegation noted that the use of modern technology such as electronic devices attached to fish aggregating equipment could assist in monitoring fishing activities.

52. The Sub-Committee acknowledged that compliance with existing fishery management regulations in the lake is poor. It was noted that regulatory systems exhibit a lack of harmony and standardization both within and among the lacustrine States. They also tended to be based on a top-down approach, which sometimes imposes unclear or restrictive laws on poor communities. However, it was also noted that bottom-up approaches may become ineffective at a certain point due to inadequate political stature. In order to correct this situation, the Sub-Committee stressed the desirability of harmonization of fishery policies in the Lake in a manner that combines top-down and bottom-up approaches and ensures broad participation of relevant stakeholders.

53. Delegates remarked on several examples and strategies from the wider region that could serve as useful models for developing and harmonizing policies and strengthening institutions in the Tanganyika lake basin. Specifically, the Lake Victoria Fisheries Organisation has been successful at harmonizing fishery legislation in Lake Victoria through a process starting at the local community level to raise awareness of fishery issues, ensure the inclusion of sound science into policy, and facilitate elaboration of national policies. Consultation and dialogue with fishing communities in Lake Kariba had proved successful at determining the understanding of local residents with regard to legal and illegal fishing activities, deciding appropriate actions to pursue and identifying primary and secondary stakeholders. Management in Lake Kariba included specific zones managed by traditional village chiefs.

54. The Sub-Committee commended the development of an international convention and cooperative frameworks relating to Lake Tanganyika (see Agenda item 7), but it was stressed that such conventions need to be domesticated into national legislation. The Sub-Committee stressed that national legislation needs to be in place before regional or international conventions can be effectively implemented.

55. Several delegates noted that a compendium of national legislation on fishery issues had been created under the Lake Tanganyika Research Project (LTR) and that this could serve as a useful reference tool for standardizing and harmonizing current legislation. Although this was generally acknowledged, it was pointed out that much of the older legislation may have limited application today because of changing circumstances and the fact that it was often imposed on fishers in a top-down manner, without adequate consultation of relevant stakeholders.

Control and responsible use of alien species in the lake basin

56. The Secretariat noted that alien species are a proven method of improving productivity, profitability and opportunity from aquatic systems, but that they have also been identified as one of the most significant threats to aquatic biodiversity. An FAO framework on how to approach alien species was presented, which consists of:

57. Specific articles in the CCRF that deal with alien species were presented, with particular attention to Article 9.2, which states, inter alia:

58. The Secretariat further noted that the CCRF, and other components of the above framework are in accordance with and complementary to other international conventions, in particular the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands.

59. There was unanimous agreement that, based on experience within the broader Eastern and Southern Africa region, the use of alien species is not justified in the Tanganyika Basin. The Sub-Committee noted the report of one delegation on the existence of national legislation to protect transboundary water systems from aquaculture escapees and effluents. It also noted the encouraging development of the recently signed Convention on Lake Tanganyika.

60. Nevertheless, in recognition that immediate action is required to protect and use responsibly the native living aquatic resources of Lake Tanganyika and in acknowledgment that impact from alien species can be basin-wide due to the numerous transboundary waterways in the lake area, the Sub-Committee unanimously agreed to recommend a ban on the use of all aquatic alien species in the Lake Tanganyika Basin. The Sub-Committee further recommended that national and regional legislation should be created, modified and harmonized as appropriate to address this issue.

61. Recognizing that a total ban on alien species may be difficult to implement and enforce, and that there may be compelling scientific reasons to allow the existence of some already established alien species, the Sub-Committee agreed to establish an ad hoc working group to address the issue of alien species in the lake basin. The terms of reference of this group should be developed in consultation with the FAO Fisheries Department. However, they should inter alia:

62. The ad hoc working group should report on its activities and progress towards the development of a Memorandum of Understanding to the next meeting of CIFA in September 2004.

63. The Sub-Committee recommended that the development of aquaculture using indigenous species from the basin should be promoted in order to provide an alternative to the culture of alien species and to reduce pressure on capture fisheries in the lake basin.

COLLABORATION BETWEEN FAO AND OTHER LAKE TANGANYIKA PARTNERS IN FISHERIES PROGRAMMES AND PROJECTS

64. The Secretariat introduced document CIFA:DM/LT/03/5 under agenda item 7, “Collaboration between FAO and other Lake Tanganyika Partners/Donors Supporting Fisheries Programmes and Projects.”

65. It was recalled that collaboration between the AfDB and FAO led to the formulation of a project aimed at implementing the Lake Tanganyika Framework Fisheries Management Plan, developed under LTR Project and adopted by the Sub-Committee at its Eighth Session in 1999. During 2000 a feasibility study and environmental impact assessment carried out by FAO and the University of Kuopio and co-financed by AfDB and the FAO FishCode Programme provided the basis for a joint AfDB/FAO project preparation phase in 2001.

66. It was further recalled that UNDP/GEF began formulation of a second project based on the results of the Trans-Boundary Diagnostic Analysis (TDA) and the Strategic Action Programme (SAP) developed under the Lake Tanganyika Biodiversity Project (LTBP) in 2000. A Convention between the four lacustrine States was also drafted in the context of the LTBP in order to give a legal framework to their cooperation in the sustainable management of Lake Tanganyika. Pending creation of a permanent management authority under the Convention, an Interim Lake Management Authority Project was now under development.

67. The Sub-Committee was informed that the World Conservation Union (IUCN) had also become engaged in the multilateral effort towards developing a regional lake basin programme, and had joined with UNDP/GEF, the AfDB and FAO in a “Lake Tanganyika Partners Meeting” held on June 17-18, 2003, at the African Development Bank (AfDB) Interim Headquarters in Tunis.

68. The Secretariat reported that at the “Lake Tanganyika Partners” meeting each partner made presentations detailing their involvement with Lake Tanganyika and the status of the respective projects being proposed as part of the Regional Programme for the Integrated Management of Lake Tanganyika. These included:

69. The Secretariat stressed that FAO was the most appropriate lead technical partner for fisheries-related activities under the proposed regional programme, noting that it was in keeping with recommendations of the Sub-Committee at its Ninth Session, and the Organization’s long-standing commitment to promote the sustainable use of Lake Tanganyika fisheries resources. It was further emphasized that, also in accordance with Sub-Committee recommendations at its Ninth Session, the FishCode Programme would continue to serve as a primary FAO link for the joint regional programme.

70. The attention of the Sub-Committee was drawn to the following current and proposed activities promoted by FishCode and FAO technical departments.

a) Continued facilitation of donor support as part of the broader FishCode initiative to promote responsible fisheries for the inland waters of Africa and other major inland fisheries regions (the “Management for Responsible Inland Fisheries (RIFI) Project.”

b) Continued regional fisheries monitoring. FAO plans to be the lead partner agency in the fisheries component of the integrated programme under the overall regional programme. The fisheries component will be based on approaches and techniques developed as part of the Lake Tanganyika Fisheries Monitoring Programme (LTFMP) in collaboration with the University of Kuopio.

c) Support for improved fisheries data and information through the Strategy for Improving Information on Status and Trends of Capture Fisheries (approved at the Twenty-fifth Session of the Committee on Fisheries, Rome, February 2003), due to start in early 2004.

d) Technical support for other catchment-related initiatives under the regional integrated management programme in collaboration with the FAO Agriculture Department

71. The Sub-Committee was informed that FishCode and the University of Kuopio were in the final stages of negotiating a modest allocation from the Government of Finland to mobilize the RIFI initiative and continue the functioning of the Bujumbura Documentation Centre on an interim basis. This Documentation Centre established by LTR Project contains a wealth of unique archival material on Lake Tanganyika and African limnology. It was important to maintain the facility, inter alia, as a resource for an eventual Lake Tanganyika Authority.

72. With regard to co-financing arrangements for the joint regional programme, the Secretariat notified the Sub-Committee that although important components are now in place, substantial contributions are anticipated from other donors, e.g. the European Union (EU). Delegations were reminded of the importance for countries to contact the EU and other donors in order to stress the need for funding of the regional programme proposal.

73. The Sub-Committee was informed that the Lake Tanganyika Partners at their Tunis meeting had agreed that a number of activities important to the overall regional programme be considered joint initiatives, and financed accordingly. These include:

74. Separate financing was deemed appropriate for other activities and expenses related to administration and technical assistance unique to each component project.

75. In terms of a structure for a single integrated programme with different technical management units, the Sub-Committee was informed that the following arrangement had been suggested, with the understanding that detailed implementation arrangements for specialized technical assistance components will be formulated at a later stage:

76. The Sub-Committee noted that, in consideration of FAO’s long experience in fisheries management in Lake Tanganyika, other partners had recognized FAO as a logical lead partner for technical assistance in fisheries management and development under the joint regional programme.

77. Delegates were informed of steps required before the Regional Programme can get underway. In particular, the AfDB plans to field a mission as soon as possible to appraise its component project, and to revise and update the project as appropriate. Further collaboration is needed between the participating countries, AfDB, FAO and potential donors in order to clarify funding strategies.

78. In other intersessional developments, members of the Sub-Committee were briefed on the Third International Symposium on Speciation in Ancient Lakes (SIAL III), held in September 2002 at the Limnological Institute, Irkutsk, Russian Federation. The final recommendations of the Symposium endorsed the FishCode RIFI Project proposal, and also called for a long-term initiative in fisheries and biodiversity conservation for all major ancient lakes (Baikal, Biwa, Victoria, Tanganyika, Malawi and Titacaca) and ancient lake basins (including the Caspian and Black Sea basins).

79. Members of the Sub-Committee were also briefed on plans by the Aquatic Ecosystem Health and Management Society (AEHMS) to organize the international Great Lakes of the World (GLOW) IV Symposium in Lusaka in 2004.

80. Following the Secretariat’s presentation, the Chair invited comments by Observers from the AfDB, the GEF Lake Tanganyika Management Project, the University of Kuopio (Finland) and COMESA.

81. The Secretariat expressed his appreciation to the AfDB Observer for a comprehensive update on developments towards the establishment of the Regional Programme for the Integrated Management of Lake Tanganyika, and to FAO for the considerable efforts it has taken to lead and encourage this regional initiative.

82. He informed the Sub-Committee that the commitment of partner agencies, confirmed in Tunis, June 2003, led AfDB to increase its commitment to the joint regional programme from 15 to 20 million Units of Account (approximately US$ 27 million).

83. The Observer further noted that AfDB Management has urged that preparations for the programme move quickly to take advantage of the immense opportunity for regional collaboration that it affords. Failure to act swiftly could jeopardize the long and involved process that the four lacustrine countries and their donor and technical partners have worked so hard to advance.

84. It was crucial therefore that the concerned Ministers of the four States rapidly respond to the request from AfDB to reconfirm their respective commitments to the Lake Tanganyika Fisheries and Biodiversity Management Project. Delegates were urged to advise their respective Governments on the importance and urgency of this request.

85. The AfDB Observer explained that the planned modular approach to project implementation will secure the eventual full participation of all the lacustrine States, even if some States are not at present eligible to receive further AfDB assistance. This arrangement allowed the regional project to move ahead in an integrated manner to reduce poverty, increase food security and protect the biodiversity of the lake basin.

86. The Observer from the GEF Lake Tanganyika Management Project expressed his gratitude to the Secretariat for inviting him to this session of the Sub-Committee, and for its comprehensive update on progress towards the joint regional programme. He commended all of the Lake Tanganyika Partners who attended the June 2002 meeting in Tunis, the Government of Finland and the University of Kuopio for their dedication to ensuring a sustainable future for Lake Tanganyika and its peoples.

87. The Observer stressed that the role of the CIFA Sub-Committee on Lake Tanganyika in encouraging basin-wide fisheries management coordination, was now more important than ever, since a stage towards implementation of the UNDP/GEF Strategic Action Programme and establishment of a Lake Tanganyika Authority, had been reached.

88. He requested the Sub-Committee to assist the creation of an interim authority, and to facilitate the ratification of the Convention, establishment of the permanent authority, and implementation of the priority projects identified under the SAP.

89. The Observer from the University of Kuopio, who served as the Scientific Coordinator of the LTR Project since its inception, informed members of the Sub-Committee that the reported progress towards a joint regional programme marked a very important historical the achievement for Lake Tanganyika and its peoples.

90. He assured the Sub-Committee that the University of Kuopio team would strongly advocate for further contributions from the Government of Finland in support of the regional programme and particularly in support of those components related to fisheries, environmental conservation and capacity building.

91. The Observer further expressed the view that FAO should continue to take the lead in facilitating the regional programme, and that the Government of Finland should seek further involvement as a partner to the regional initiative through FAO and the FishCode Programme.

92. The Observer also advised delegations that the University of Kuopio would continue to support the Lake Tanganyika Fisheries Monitoring Programme, which it considered very successful. He noted that although the LTFMP was formally ended in 2001, it has been continued on a voluntary basis with the enthusiastic participation of national staff of the respective lakeside fisheries research stations.

93. The Observer from COMESA expressed his gratitude to the Secretariat of the Sub-Committee for the invitation to attend the Session. He further expressed the hope that cooperation between the Sub-Committee and COMESA, would be strengthened. He confirmed the interest of COMESA to be involved with the joint regional programme.

94. In responding to the presentation of agenda item 7, members of the Sub-Committee commended the Secretariat for providing an excellent overview of intersessional developments.

95. Members were unanimous that every effort should be made to ensure a rapid and positive response to the request of the AfDB for renewing applications for assistance under the Bank’s Lake Tanganyika Fisheries and Biodiversity Management Project.

96. Individual delegations addressed various questions related to specific administrative arrangements and funding allocations that were being envisaged under the joint regional component projects proposed by the AfDB and UNDP/GEF. These questions were addressed as appropriate by the AfDB and UNDP/GEF Project Observers, who assured delegates that full consultations with respective lacustrine States will continue throughout the project preparation phases.

97. In light of the presentation on agenda item 7 and the interventions made, the Sub-Committee agreed to endorse:

a) continued full involvement of FAO and the FishCode Programme in the proposed joint regional programme for Lake Tanganyika, now constituted as the Regional Programme for the Integrated Management of Lake Tanganyika.

b) the programme elements proposed by the respective Lake Tanganyika Partners.

c) with reference to the RIFI initiative, continued development of collaborative links between FishCode and (a) SIAL-associated efforts to promote fisheries and biodiversity conservation for all major ancient lakes, as well as (b) AEHMS/GLOW IV related activities.

d) the strong involvement of national fisheries management and research personnel of the four Lake Tanganyika States in the GLOW IV Symposium planned for 2004.

THE FUTURE ROLE OF THE FAO CIFA SUB-COMMITTEE IN THE CONTEXT OF THE LAKE TANGANYIKA CONVENTION

98. The Secretariat introduced this Agenda item on the basis of document CIFA:DM/LT/03/6

99. Members of the Sub-Committee were reminded that the current functions of the Sub-Committee were adopted by the Eighth Session held in Lusaka Zambia in May 1999.

100. The Sub-Committee was requested to refer to Articles 7 and 27 of the Convention on the Sustainable Management of Lake Tanganyika. The objective of the Convention is to ensure the protection and conservation of the biological diversity and the sustainable use of the natural resources of Lake Tanganyika and its Basin by the Contracting States on the basis of integrated and cooperative management.

101. Members of the Sub-Committee applauded the signing of the Convention on the Sustainable Management of Lake Tanganyika by the four lacustrine countries as a significant step towards regional management of the Lake.

102. The Sub-committee proceeded to review four possible institutional arrangements for the strengthening of fisheries management and development in Lake Tanganyika. These were:

a) a regional working group under the CIFA sub-committee for Lake Tanganyika;

b) a technical committee with a Permanent Secretariat;

c) an organization based on the model of the Lake Victoria Fisheries Organization (LVFO); and

d) an intergovernmental fisheries management and development committee under Article 7 and 27 of the Convention on the sustainable Management of Lake Tanganyika.

103. Members of the Sub-Committee preferred options (c) and (d). The LVFO model had already been established and had achieved significant success in the region tackling some difficult fisheries management issues relating to access, sustainability and marketing of fish products from Lake Victoria. Its structure allowed for a sound scientific base, resolution of short-term management issues required in a dynamic fisheries context, as well as high level resolution through a Council of Ministers responsible for fisheries. It is sustainable and has been funded by the member countries since its establishment through legal assistance provided by the FAO.

104. Members also noted that an intergovernmental fisheries management and development committee under Article 7 of the Convention on Sustainable Management of Lake Tanganyika would incorporate the fisheries sector within an already agreed Convention. It would provide the technical scientific base and resolution of high-level issues at an inter-ministerial level of fisheries and other Ministers.

105. The Sub-Committee debated these two options and recommended that the possibility of incorporating a structure similar to the LVFO within the Convention be examined by the Regional Programme for the Integrated Management of Lake Tanganyika.

106. It was recognized that some delay may arise in the process of full ratification and implementation of the Convention by the four State Parties. It was therefore agreed that the process should be monitored and facilitated by the Sub-Committee through technical advice and assistance as appropriate.

107. The Sub-Committee noted that the Convention addresses a wide variety of sectors and stakeholder interests, including those of agriculture, biodiversity conservation, water resource management and transport. It further noted that the fisheries sector is of overriding significance to the socio-economic welfare of Tanganyika Basin residents. Members of the Sub-Committee expressed the view that the high profile of the fishery sector should be accorded due regard. It must be adequately represented and its needs fully addressed in deliberations on the Convention and institutional mechanisms created under the Convention’s Articles.

108. To address these concerns the Sub-Committee recommended an in-depth analysis of the Convention to determine its possible implications on the responsible use of living aquatic resources of the Lake and the people who depend on these resources for their food and livelihood.

109. In light of the above considerations the Sub-Committee decided that it will be essential to maintain its role under the FAO CIFA Sub-Committee mechanisms as the primary technical fishery advisory body in the Lake Tanganyika region during the transitional period leading up to full implementation of the articles of the Convention.

ANY OTHER MATTERS

110. There were no other new matters raised.

DATE AND PLACE OF THE ELEVENTH SESSION

111. The Sub-Committee applauded the kind invitation of the Democratic Republic of Congo to host the Eleventh Session of the Sub-Committee of Lake Tanganyika in Kinshasa in 2005. Burundi offered to be the alternative host for the same Session in case DRC desists.

112. The Sub-Committee was informed that the exact date of the meeting would be decided by the Director-General of FAO in consultation with the Chairman of the Sub-Committee and the competent authorities of the host country.

ADOPTION OF THE REPORT

113. The report of the Tenth Session of the CIFA Sub-Committee for Lake Tanganyika was adopted on 31 October 2003.

APPENDIX

Appendix A. Agenda

1. Opening of the session

2. Election of Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson

3. Adoption of the Agenda and arrangements for the session

4. Action on recommendation of the ninth session of the Sub-Committee

5. The status of Lake Tanganyika fisheries by national sectors

6. Application of the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries in the management of Lake Tanganyika and for the control and responsible use of alien species in the lake basin

7. Collaboration between FAO and other Lake Tanganyika partners in fisheries programmes and projects

8. The future role of the FAO CIFA Sub-Committee in the context of the Lake Tanganyika Convention

9. Any other matters

10. Date and place of the eleventh session

11. Adoption of the report of the tenth session of the Sub-Committee.

Appendix B. List of participants

MEMBERS OF THE COMMITTEE/MEMBRES DU COMITÉ

Burundi

Roger KANYARU
Directeur
Département eaux, pêche et pisciculture
Ministère de l’agriculture et de l’élevage
B. P. 1850
Bujumbura
Tel: 22.63.78
Fax: 21.28.20
E-mail: ltfmp-bjm@cbinf.com

Etienne MBONIMPA
Conseiller
Département eaux, pêche et pisciculture
Ministère de l’agriculture et de l’élevage
B. P. 1850
Bujumbura
Tel: 22.63.78
Fax: 21.28.20

Democratic Republic of the Congo/République démocratique du Congo

Mino-Kalibu KALIBU
Directeur
Service national de promotion et de développement de la pêche
(SENADEP)
Tel: (243) 81508 9120
E-mail: kalibumino@yahoo.fr/senadep@micronet.cd

François GAYO LEMBA
Directeur des pêches
Ministère de l’agriculture, des pêches et de l’élevage du Congo
Kinshasa
DRC/RDC
Tel: (243) 9912450
E-mail: gayo@hotvoice.com

United Republic of Tanzania/République-Unie de Tanzanie

John BAYONA
Director
TAFIRI
PO Box 9750
Dar-es-Salaam
Tel: (255) 22 2650046
Fax: (255) 222650043
E-mail: jdrbayona@hotmail.com

Janet Samuel URONU
Acting Assistant Director
Responsible for Control and Surveillance
Fisheries Division
PO Box 2462
Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania
Tel: (255) 22 222930 2116159/0744597017
Fax: (255) 22 2110352
E-mail: janeturonu@hotmail.com

Zambia/Zambie

Charles MAGUSWI
Deputy Director
Fisheries Department
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
PO Box 350100
Chilanga
Tel: (260)-1-27.81.73
Fax: (260) 1 278418
E-mail: Piscator@zamnet.zm

Harris PHIRI
Senior Fisheries Research Officer
Department of Fisheries
Lake Tanganyika Research Unit
PO Box 55
Mpulungu
Tel: (260) 1 455134
Fax: (260) 1 455134
E-mail: LTFMPMP@ZAMTEL.ZM

Cyprian KAPASA
Deputy Director
Fisheries Research
Ministry of Agriculture and Co-operative
PO Box 350100
Chilanga, Zambia/Zambie
Tel: (260)-1-27.81.73
Fax: (260) 1 278418
E-mail: Piscator@zamnet.zm

Timothy ZULU
Chief Fisheries Training Officer
Fisheries Department
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
PO Box 350100
Chilanga
Tel: (260)-1-27.81.73
Fax: (260) 1 278418
E-mail: Piscator@zamnet.zm

Patrick NGALANDE
Chief Fisheries Research officer
Fisheries Department
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
PO Box 350100
Chilanga
Tel: (260)-1-27.81.73
Fax: (260) 1 278418
E-mail: Piscator@zamnet.zm

Edward CHILIMUNDA
Information Desk Officer
Fisheries Department
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
PO Box 350100
Chilanga
Tel: (260)0978 74330
E-mail: Piscator@zamnet.zm

Chisata MUBANGA
Acting Chief Fisheries Officer
Fisheries Department
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
PO Box 350100
Chilanga
Tel: (260)-1-27.81.73
Fax: (260) 1 278418
Piscator@zamnet.zm

Angester MILATU
Executive Officer
Fisheries Department
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
PO Box 350100
Chilanga
Tel: (260)-1-278618
Fax: (260) 1 278418
E-mail: Piscator@zamnet.zm

Mate MUTEMWA
Economist (FAO Desk Officer)
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives
PO Box 50197
Lusaka, Zambia/Zambie
Tel: (260)-1-250532
Fax: (260) 1 278418
E-mail: dmmatt2001@yahoo.com

OBSERVERS/OBSERVATEURS

African Development Bank/Banque africaine de développement

Samba TOUNKARA
Expert en pêche supérieur
B. P. 323 -1002
BAD/ATR
Tunis, Tunisie
Tel: (916)71102330
E-mail: s.tounkara@afdb.org

Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa/Marché commun de l’Afrique orientale et australe

Kabeya Patrice KANDOLO
Agricultural Expert/Expert agricole
COMESA Secretariat
PO Box 30057
Lusaka, Zambia/Zambie
Tel: (260-1) 221027
Fax::(260-1) 221349

Finland/Finlande

Hannu P. Olavi MOLSA
Professor
University of Kuopio
PO Box 1627
70211 Kuopio, Finland/Finlande
Tel: (358) 17 163145
Fax: (358) 17 163752
E-mail: hannu.molsa@uku.fi

United Nations Development Programme/Global Environment Facility/Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement - Fonds pour la protection de l’environnement (FEM)

Benoit BIHAMIRIZA
Regional Coordinator
Lake Tanganyika Project (UNDP/GEF)
IPS Building 6th Floor
Samora/Azikiwe Avenue
PO Box 2661
Dar-Es-Salaam
Tel: (255) 224946
Fax: (255) 22 4943
E-mail: benoitb@unopsmail.org

FAO Fisheries Department/Département des pêches de la FAO

Headquarters/Siège
Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
00100 Rome, Italy/Italie

Eric REYNOLDS
Coordinator FishCode Programme/
Coordonnateur du programme FISHCODE
Tel: (39-06) 57052122
Fax: (39-06) 57056500
E-mail: eric.reynolds @fao.org

Devin BARTLEY
Senior Fisheries Resources Officer/Fonctionnaire principal des pêches
Tel: (39-06) 570 4376
Fax: (39-06) 570 3020
E-mail: devin.bartley@fao.org

FAO Subregional Office for Southern and Eastern Africa/Bureau sous-régional de la FAO pour l’Afrique australe et orientale

George William SSENTONGO
Fisheries Officer/Fonctionnaire des pêches
Third Street/J. Moyo Avenue
PO Box 3730, Harare, Zimbabwe
Tel: (263-4) 791407/253655 - 7
Fax: (263-4) 703496/700724
E-mail: george.ssentongo@fao.org

Aubrey HARRIS
Senior Fisheries Officer/Fonctionnaire principal des pêches
Third Street/J. Moyo Avenue
PO Box 3730, Harare, Zimbabwe
Tel: (263-4) 791407/253655 - 7
Fax: (263-4) 703496/700724
E-mail: Aubrey.harris@fao.org

SECRETARIAT/SECRÉTARIAT

Grace CHAGONDA
Programme Assistant/
Third Street/J. Moyo Avenue
PO Box 3730, Harare, Zimbabwe
Tel: (263-4) 791407/253655-7
Fax: (263-4) 703496/700724
E-mail: grace.chagonda@fao.org

Valérie MASENGU
Secretary/Secretaire
C/O COMESA Court of Justice
PO Box 30051
Ben Bella Road
Lusaka, Zambia
Tel: (260-1) 221027
Fax::(260-1) 221349
E-mail: vmasengu@yahoo.fr

Jenny G BANDA
Secretary
Ministry of Agriculture and Co-operative
PO Box 350100
Chilanga, Zambia
Tel: (260)-1-27.8618
Fax: (260) 1 278418
E-mail: Piscator@zamnet.zm

Marguerite HEESE
Conference Interpreter/Interprète
PO Box 378
Halfway house, 1685
South Africa

Catherine JELE
Conference Interpreter/Interprète
4 Glasgow Road
Lombardy West 2090
South Africa
Email: cathou@yebo.co.za

Keguro MUHINDI
Conference Interpreter/Interprète
PO Box 56061
Nairobi, Kenya
Tel: (254) 20 434 70 66
Fax: (254) 20 434 34 42
E-mail: muhindi@africaonline.co.ke

Luc ZAMBO ZAMBO
Conference Interpreter/Interprète
PO Box CY 359
Causeway
Harare, Zimbabwe
Tel: (263) 4 336063
E-mail: zambo@pobox.com

Luc-Pierre RAEMDONCK
Conference Translator/traducteur
3 Pineleigh Close
Hatfield
Harare, Zimbabwe
Tel: (263) 4 11 408 046
E-mail: lucpierre@zol.co.zw

Appendix C. List of documents

CIFA:DM/LT/03/1

Provisional Agenda and Timetable

CIFA:DM/LT/03/2

Actions on Recommendations of the Ninth Session of the Sub-Committee

CIFA:DM/LT/03/3

The status of Lake Tanganyika fisheries by national sectors

CIFA:DM/LT/03/4

Application of the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries in the Management of Lake Tanganyika and for the Control and Responsible Use of Alien species in the Lake Basin

CIFA:DM/LT/03/5

Collaboration between FAO and other Lake Tanganyika Partners in fisheries programmes and projects

CIFA:DM/LT/03/6

The future role of the FAO CIFA Sub-Committee in the context of the lake Tanganyika convention.

CIFA:DM/LT/03/Inf. 1

List of Participants

CIFA:DM/LT/03/Inf. 2

Report of the Ninth Session of the CIFA Sub-Committee for Lake Tanganyika

CIFA:DM/LT/03/Inf. 3

Report of the Twelfth Session of the Committee for Inland Fisheries of Africa (CIFA)

CIFA:DM/LT/03/Inf. 4

Code of conduct for Responsible Fisheries

CIFA: DM/LT/03/Inf 5

Inland Fisheries FAO Technical Guidelines for Responsible Fisheries No. 6

Appendix D. Speech by The Honourable Mundia F Sikatana, MP, Minister of Agriculture and Co-operatives

Mr Chairman,
The FAO Representative,
The Riparian States Delegates
Representatives of various Organizations Present
Invited Guests
Ladies and Gentlemen

I feel greatly honoured to be accorded this opportunity to be here with you on the occasion of the tenth session of the CIFA Sub-Committee for Lake Tanganyika. It is indeed a great opportunity for me to familiarize with the programmes and activities of the inland fisheries Sub-Committee for Lake Tanganyika.

Mr Chairman,

I would like to welcome you all to Zambia and I sincerely hope that you will have successful deliberations that will help you chart the way forward for the fisheries industry.

I am aware that Lake Tanganyika is an exceptionally old natural water body with a surface area estimated at 33 000 km2. It is the longest lake in the world with a total volume of water of 19 million cubic meters. You will agree with me that this is an enormous natural resource, which Zambia is endowed with and should therefore be utilized fully.

I am glad to note that the lake contributes to the fisheries industry an estimated 13 000 tonnes of fish annually and that this represents about 20 percent of the overall fish production.

Mr Chairman,

Although the lake is of global value and of great socio-economic importance at both national and global levels sustainable management and utilization of the fish resource found on this lake is a source of great concern to the four riparian states and collaborating partners as the lake’s integrity is threatened by human activity.

Mr Chairman,

I am aware that the Sub-Committee has been meeting since 1978 when the session of the Sub-Committee was held in Lusaka, in order to agree on the fisheries management strategies. I am also aware that in the past two sessions, members of the Sub-Committee expressed the wish for creating a regional intergovernmental fisheries body where the riparian countries would cooperate in the management and development of fisheries through implementation of the Code of Conduct. This was indeed a resolution to work together as this would enhance consensus among the Sub-Committees.

Mr Chairman,

As you are aware, the creation of the Lake Victoria Organization by the riparian States has brought about notable benefits for the member countries. I therefore urge the sub-committee of Lake Tanganyika also to emulate the Lake Victoria Organization.

Mr Chairman,

Allow me to inform members of the Sub-Committee that the riparian countries of Lake Tanganyika signed the final version of the Convention on the Sustainable Management of Lake Tanganyika on June 12, 2003. This convention was aimed at promoting sustainable fisheries management of the lake and make priority appropriate measures to prevent and reduce adverse impacts resulting form fishing activities. This will help us conserve the many species of fish in the lake. It is important, therefore, that the riparian countries look after this huge resource properly for its sustainable utilization.

Mr Chairman,

It is absolutely important also that the lake is equitably utilized among the riparian states within their jurisdiction without necessarily causing harm to other beneficiary states. I hope all these issues can be discussed on this forum so that the inland fisheries Sub-Committee should have a common understanding as regards to management of the lake fisheries in a sustainable manner. Without this common approach, sustainable management of the lake will be difficult to achieve.

Mr Chairman,

My Government is supportive of this form of stakeholder participation of fisheries management. In fact, the Government is in the process of approving a revised Fisheries Act that has drawn a lot of input from various stakeholders among which are the Traditional Authority, Private Investors, Community Based Organizations (COBs, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and other interested groups. References have also been drawn from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Code of Conduct for Fisheries in neighbouring States.

Mr Chairman,

I wish to recognize the efforts by Food and Agriculture Organization through the Sub-Committee. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has also been instrumental in establishing a framework for co-operation among the riparian States in providing a forum for information sharing and the development of joint management approaches. Further, collaboration with other interested partners such as FINNIDA has generated critical data that has assisted with the decision making process and enhanced prospects of obtaining funding for the sustainable development of the lake.

Mr Chairman,

Let me now thank the government of Finland, the African Development Bank (AfDB), the International Union for Nature Conservation (IUCN) and the Global Environmental Facility (GEF) for coming to this meeting and deliberate with us. This endorses your ardent consideration and importance with which you attach to issues pertaining to Lake Tanganyika.

I also with to thank the Lusaka FAO office and the FAO Sub-regional Office for Eastern and Southern Africa based in Harare, Zimbabwe for the continued support.

It is my sincere hope that the deliberations will be very fruitful on the basis of a common objective for the lake and that the meeting will successfully deliberate with a clear focus on the e expectations.

Mr Chairman

It is now my privilege and honour to declare the tenth session of the Sub-Committee meeting for the Lake Tanganyika officially open.

Thank you and may God bless you.

Appendix E. Summary of major decisions and recommendations

Item 4

Action on recommendations of the Ninth Session of the Sub-committee

For the Attention of Governments

1. Strengthen the implementation of follow-up actions between sessions

Item 5

The Status of Lake Tanganyika Fisheries by National Sectors

For the Attention of Governments

1. Develop management mechanisms and partnership to strengthen legislation on closed season, closed areas, fish catch quotas, minimum mesh size, control of rift nets, and prohibition of beach seines.

2. Update fisheries Act

3. Establish unified strategies to combat and reduce general insecurity on the lake including gear thefts and pirating

4. Build the capacity of fisheries departments staff through appropriate training.

5. Establish a common legal framework for fisheries activities for all riparian countries.

6. Establish an International management authority for Lake Tanganyika.

Item 6

Application of the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries in the Management of Lake Tanganyika and for the Control and Responsible Use of Alien Species in the Lake Basin

Management of Lake Tanganyika

For the Attention of Governments

1. Promote and support participatory approaches with fishing communities and other important stakeholders to facilitate rapid establishment of co-management (collaborative management)

2. Improve and strengthen standardization, control and surveillance with regards to inspection of commercial and artisanal fishing boats

3. Harmonize fisheries policy on the Lake in a manner that combines top down and bottom up approaches to ensure broad participation of relevant stakeholders.

Control and Responsible Use of Alien Species in the Lake Basin

For the Attention of Governments

1. Establish and ad hoc working group to address the issue of alien species in the lake basin.

2. Development of a Memorandum of Understanding among the riparian states of Lake Tanganyika.

3. The ad hoc working group to report on its activities towards the development of a Memorandum of Understanding to the next meeting of CIFA in September 20004.

4. Promote the development of aquaculture using indigenous species from the basin in order to provide an alternative to the culture of alien species

Item 7

Collaboration between FAO and other Lake Tanganyika Partners in fisheries programmes and projects

For the Attention of Governments

1. Make efforts to ensure the rapid and positive response to the request of the African Development Bank for renewing application for assistance under the Bank’s Lake Tanganyika Fisheries and Biodiversity Management Project.

2. Involve national fisheries management and research personnel of the four Lake Tanganyika States in the GLOW IV Symposium planned for 2004

For the Attention of FAO

1. Continue Full involvement of FAO and the FishCode programme in the proposed joint regional programme for Lake Tanganyika, now constituted as the Regional Progrmame for the Integrated Management of lake Tanganyika

2. Support the programme elements proposed by the respective lake Tanganyika Partners

3. Continue development of collaborative links between FishCode and (a) SIAL-associated efforts to promote fisheries and biodiversity conservation for all major ancient lakes, as well as (b) AEHMS/GLOW IV related activities.

Item 8

The future role of the FAO CIFA Sub-Committee in the context of the Lake Tanganyika Convention

For the Attention of Governments

1. Examine the possibility of incorporating a structure similar to that of Lake Victoria Fisheries Organization (LVFO) within the Lake Tanganyika Convention

2. Monitor the process of ratification and implementation of the Convention by the four Member States through appropriate technical advise and assistance.

3. Accord due regard to the high profile of the fisheries sector.

4. Address fully the needs of fisheries in the deliberation of the convention and institutional mechanisms created under specific Article 7 and 27 of the Convention.

5. Make in-depth analysis of the Convention to determine its possible implications on the responsible use of the aquatic resources and the people who depend on these resources for their food and livelihoods.

6. Maintain the role of the Sub-Committee under the FAO CIFA Sub-Committee mechanisms as the primary technical fishery advisory body in the Lake Tanganyika region during the transitional period leading to full implementation of the Articles of the convention

BACK COVER

This document is the final report of the tenth session of the Committee for Inland Fisheries of Africa (CIFA) Sub-Committee for Lake Tanganyika, which was held in Lusaka, Zambia, from 28 to 31 October 2003. The major topics discussed were: status of Lake Tanganyika fisheries by national sectors; application of the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries in the management of Lake Tanganyika and for the control and responsible use of alien species in the lake basin; collaboration between FAO and other Lake Tanganyika partners in the fisheries programmes and projects; and future role of the FAO CIFA Sub-Committee in the context of the Lake Tanganyika Convention. The summary of the main recommendations and decisions is shown in Appendix E.


Top of Page Next Page