Building a liftable propulsion system for small fishing craft.
The BOB Drive

Manuals and Guides - BOBP/MAG/14

Building a liftable propulsion
system for small fishing craft.
The BOB Drive

by
O. Gulbrandsen
Consultant Naval Architect
M. R. Andersen
Small Craft Specialist (APO, BOBP)

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS

BAY OF BENGAL PROGRAMME Madras, India 1993

Table of Contents


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ABSTRACT

Motorization of small fishing craft has contributed considerably to fisheries development in the Bay of Bengal region over the last few decades. In Indonesia. Thailand and Bangladesh the most common engines by far for small fishing craft, are the 5 - 15 hp range of multipurpose diesel engines used for water pumps, generators, power tillers and small tractors. The advantages of this type of engine, compared with the specially marinized diesel engine, is the low cost and easy availability of both engines and spare paris. Two methods for the installation of these engines have been developed and widely introduced. The conventional inboard installation, where the propeller shall is fitted through the keel structure, is used in boats operating from harbours or sheltered beaches. In the ‘longtail’ installation, the engine Sits on top of the transom and the propeller shaft goes through a long tube to the propeller. These two methods of installations are, however, not suitable for boats that have to land on surf-beaten beaches.


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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Manuals and Guides - BOBP/MAG/14pdf

INTRODUCTION
LIST OF MATERIALS

INDEXpdf


PAGES 1 TO 10pdf


PAGES 11 TO 20pdf


PAGES 21 TO 30pdf


PAGES 31 TO 38PDF


PHOTO pdf


BACK COVERpdf