Back to FAO Fisheries site
Français
Meeting documents

Report of the

TWENTIETH SESSION OF THE

EUROPEAN INLAND FISHERIES ADVISORY COMMISSION

Praia do Carvoeiro, Portugal, 23 June - 1 July 1998

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS

ROME, 1998

 

PREPARATION OF THIS DOCUMENT

The present text is the final version of the report adopted on 1 July 1998 by the participants in the Twentieth Session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission.

Distribution:
Participants
EIFAC Member States
European Community
EIFAC Mailing List
FAO Fisheries Department
FAO Regional Fisheries Officers

 

 

FAO.

Report of the twentieth session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission. Praia do Carvoeiro, Portugal, 23 June - 1 July 1998.

FAO Fisheries Report. No. 580. Rome, FAO. 1998. 47p.

SUMMARY

The Twentieth Session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission (EIFAC) was held in Praia do Carvoeiro, Portugal, from 23 June to 1 July 1998, in concomitance with a Symposium on Water for Sustainable Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture. The session reviewed EIFAC's activities since 1996 in the fields of fishery biology and management, aquaculture, protection of the aquatic resource, and social and economic issues. EIFAC revised its Rules of Procedure and decided its future programme of work, and in particular the activities which should be carried out until the next session of the Commission in 2000, planned to be held in Hungary and preceded by a Symposium on Fisheries and Society.

CONTENTS

DECISIONS, DIRECTIVES AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE TWENTIETH SESSION OF EIFAC

OFFICERS OF EIFAC AND CONVENORS OF AD HOC WORKING PARTIES

I. OPENING OF THE SESSION

II. ADOPTION OF THE AGENDA

III. SYMPOSIUM ON WATER FOR SUSTAINABLE INLAND FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE

IV. REVIEW OF RULES OF PROCEDURE OF EIFAC

V. BIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (Sub-Commission I)

 Introduction

 Fishing gear selectivity

 Eels

 Electric fishing

 Introductions and stocking

 Brackishwater fisheries and aquaculture

 Synopsis on Alosa alosa and Alosa fallax

 Maps of fish distribution and aquatic habitat quality

 Election of Officers

VI. AQUACULTURE (Sub-Commission II)

 Introduction

 Fish diseases and their control

 Aquatic resources management in aquaculture

 Fish and crustacean nutrition

 Orientation of the Sub-Commission

 Programme of the Sub-Commission

 Election of Officers

VII. PROTECTION OF THE AQUATIC RESOURCE (Sub-Commission III)

 Introduction

 Accumulated toxicants in fish

 Working Party on Effects of Physical Modifications of the Aquatic Habitat on Fish Populations

 Prevention and control of bird predation

 Influence of management practices on the environment

 Programme of the Sub-Commission

 Election of Officers

VIII. SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC ISSUES (Sub-Commission IV)

 Introduction

 Education in fisheries management

 Recreational fisheries

 Survey of legislation concerning the aquatic environment

 Resolution of conflicts in river basins

 Social and economic aspects of inland fisheries

 Election of Officers

IX. ADOPTION OF THE REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE SUB-COMMISSIONS

X. ADOPTION OF THE REPORT OF THE SYMPOSIUM

XI. SYMPOSIUM IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE TWENTY-FIRST SESSION OF EIFAC

XII. STRENGTHENING OF EIFAC

 Relevance of the Commission

 Communication

 Duration of the Session

XIII. ANY OTHER MATTERS

 Collaboration with other Organizations

 List of European Inland Fisheries Scientists

XIV. ELECTION OF OFFICERS

XV. DATE AND PLACE OF THE TWENTY-FIRST SESSION

XVI. ADOPTION OF THE REPORT AND CLOSING OF THE SESSION

Appendix A

Agenda

B

List of Documents

C

List of Delegates and Observers

D

Address by the Secretary of State for Fisheries, Portugal, Mr Marcelo de Vasconcelos

E

Address by the Chairman of EIFAC, Mr Christopher Moriarty, Ireland

F

Summary Report of the Symposium on Water for Sustainable Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture

G

Prospectus of the EIFAC Symposium on Fisheries and Society - Social, Economic and Cultural Perspectives of Inland Fisheries

H

Rules of Procedure of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission

List of EIFAC Correspondents

DECISIONS, DIRECTIVES AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE

TWENTIETH SESSION OF EIFAC

 

Paragraphs

Adoption of amendments to the Rules of Procedure of EIFAC

10

Cancellation of Working Party on Fishing Gear Selectivity

12

Convening an International Symposium on Anguillid eels

15

Participation in CEN Workshop on Fish Monitoring - Fishing with Electricity

16

Liaison with the Joint ICES-IMO-IOC Working Group on Ballast Water and Sediments and the ICES Working Group on Introduced Species and Transfers

19

Cancellation of Working Party on Brackishwater Fisheries and Aquaculture

20

Creation of ad hoc Working Party on Mapping of Fish Distribution and Aquatic Habitat Quality

22

Election of Officers for Sub-Commission I

25

Joint Workshop with EAFP on Health Management of Sturgeon and Carp Fisheries and Aquaculture

27

Priorities for future work of Sub-Commission II

34

Election of Officers of Sub-Commission II

37

Preparation of Manual on Rehabilitation of Lakes and Reservoirs

45

Recommendation to renegotiate Action Plan on the Management of Cormorants

48

Proposal for joint GESAMP/EIFAC Working Group on Endocrine Disrupting Substances

52

Election of officers of Sub-Commission III

54

Revival of the ad hoc Working Party on Communication and Education

57

Future activities of ad hoc Working Party on Recreational Fisheries

61

Cessation of work on a synthesis on European fisheries legislation

64

Election of officers of Sub-Commission IV

70

Recommendations on Water for Sustainable Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture

72

Recommendation to hold Symposium on Fisheries and Society

73

Initiation of Web-site news page

80

Expansion of EIFAC Newsletter

81

Duration of future Sessions

84

Increased co-operation with ICES

85

Link-up with home page of FEAP

87

Election of officers of EIFAC

89

Date and place of 21st Session

90

Adoption of the Report

92

OFFICERS OF EIFAC AND CONVENORS OF

AD HOC WORKING PARTIES

 

Chairman:

C. Moriarty

 

First Vice-Chairman:

M. Bninska

 

Second Vice-Chairman:

K. Pintér

 

Secretary:

H. Naeve

SUB-COMMISSION I - BIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT 

 

Chairman:

T. Brenner

 

Vice-Chairman:

R. Marini

 

Rapporteur:

K. Hensel

 

Technical Secretary:

G. Marmulla

ad hoc Working Parties

Eels

Convener

W. Dekker

Electric fishing

Convener

I. Cowx

Introductions and stocking

Convener

I. Cowx

Mapping of fish distribution and aquatic habitat quality

Convener

A. Lelek

SUB-COMMISSION II - AQUACULTURE 

 

Chairman:

L. Varadi

 

Vice-Chairman:

Y. Avnimelech

 

Rapporteur:

J.-P. Proteau

 

Technical Secretary:

U. Barg

ad hoc Working Parties

Fish diseases and their control

Convener

R. Richards

Aquatic resources management in aquaculture

Convener

H. Ackefors

Fish and crustacean nutrition

Convener

I. Csengeri

SUB-COMMISSION III - PROTECTION OF THE AQUATIC RESOURCES 

 

Chairman:

R. Müller

 

Vice-Chairman:

J. Allardi

 

Rapporteur:

P. Gérard

 

Technical Secretary:

H. Naeve

ad hoc Working Parties

Accumulated toxicants in fish

Convener

Z. Svobodovà

Effects of physical modification of the aquatic habitat on fish populations

Convener

J. Coeck

Methodologies for rehabilitation of lakes and reservoirs

Convener

H. Lehtonen

Prevention and control of bird predation

Convener

E. Staub

Influence of management practices on the environment

Convener

M. Aprahamian

Evaluation of ecological and human health effects from endocrine disrupting substances (jointly with GESAMP)

Coordinat.

 

P.-D. Hansen

SUB-COMMISSION IV - SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC ISSUES 

 

Chairman:

I. Cowx

 

Vice-Chairman:

L. Kukk

 

Rapporteur:

M.J. Collares-Pereira

 

Technical Secretary:

D. Greboval

ad hoc Working Parties

Communication and education

Convener

T. Brenner

Recreational fisheries

Convener

P. Hickley

Social and economic aspects of inland fisheries

Convener

A. Neiland

 

I. OPENING OF THE SESSION

1. The Twentieth Session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission (EIFAC) was held in Praia do Carvoeiro, Portugal, from 23 June to 1 July 1998 under the Chairmanship of Mr Christopher Moriarty. The Session was attended by 43 representatives from 18 members of the Commission and by observers from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea and the Federation of European Aquaculture Producers. The List of Participants is given as Appendix C to this Report.

2. The Session was opened by the Secretary of State for Fisheries of Portugal, Mr Marcelo de Vasconcelos, who drew attention to the growing importance of water and aquatic resources as limiting factors in human development. He stated that there was a clear need to focus on rehabilitation of aquatic ecosystems, involvement of local populations in development of projects and a better use of natural production. The full text of his statement is reproduced in Appendix D.

3. The Secretary of EIFAC, Mr H. Naeve, welcomed the participants in the name of the Director-General of FAO, Mr Jacques Diouf. He drew attention to recent trends in the organization and financing of inland fisheries in member countries and to recent decisions by the FAO Conference with regard to regional bodies. These changes implied the need to develop new modes of work within the Commission.

4. The Chairman of the Commission, Mr C. Moriarty, welcomed Mr H. Naeve as incoming Secretary and expressed his appreciation to the Government of Portugal for the excellent arrangements for hosting this Twentieth Session. He briefly reviewed the achievements of the Commission during the intersessional period expressing concern that, while substantial progress had been made, parts of the programme formulated at the Nineteenth Session had not been implemented. This failure was attributed mainly to changes in the ways that individual scientists were financed which restricted their ability to contribute to the Commission's work on a voluntary basis. This reinforced the need identified by the Secretary to explore alternative ways to finance and implement the Commission's programme. The Chairman's address can be found as Appendix E.

II. ADOPTION OF THE AGENDA

5. The Agenda which appears as Appendix A was adopted. The documents which were before the Commission are listed in Appendix B.

III. SYMPOSIUM ON WATER FOR SUSTAINABLE INLAND FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE

6. A Symposium on Water for Sustainable Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture was convened in conjunction with the Twentieth Session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission (EIFAC) in Praia do Carvoeiro, Portugal, from 23 to 26 June 1998. The Symposium was convened by Mr R. Müller (Switzerland) and chaired by Mr H. Ackefors (Sweden). The Symposium was attended by 68 participants from 23 countries.

7. The main documentation comprised 27 experience papers and six poster presentations. The Summary Report of the Symposium is Appendix F to this report.

IV. REVIEW OF RULES OF PROCEDURE OF EIFAC

8. The Chairman of EIFAC (Mr C. Moriarty, Ireland) presented basic issues regarding the way in which EIFAC has evolved. He emphasized that in the past EIFAC had achieved much but governance and institutional arrangements have changed in the last few years making it difficult to continue working in the same way. There was, therefore, a need to revise the ways of operating to ensure that the Commission continued to serve as the major international forum on inland fisheries and aquaculture in the future.

9. The Secretary of EIFAC (Mr H. Naeve) introduced document EIFAC/XX/98/3 setting out the Rules of Procedure of EIFAC as amended to comply with decisions made by the Twenty-ninth Session of the FAO Conference. The effect of these amended rules would be a change in the designation of the Working Parties and the Executive Committee. The Commission could retain its Sub-Commissions in their existing status. It would imply that all former Working Parties would continue as ad hoc Working Parties but, together with the Executive Committee, would be deleted from the list of Statutory Bodies.

10. The changes proposed to the Rules of Procedure were reviewed paragraph by paragraph and the members of the Commission present at the Twentieth Session unanimously adopted the proposed changes; Luxembourg had already earlier declared its consent. As less than two-thirds of the members of EIFAC were present at the Twentieth Session, there was insufficient representation to amend the Statutes at the Session. Members not represented will be polled by post. The amended Rules of Procedure are attached as Appendix H.

V. BIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (Sub-Commission I)

Introduction

11. The Chairman of the Sub-Commission, T. Brenner (Germany), informed the Session of progress achieved in the activities agreed upon by the Nineteenth Session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission. Mr P. Hickley (UK) acted as temporary Rapporteur. The main report of the intersession was provided as document EIFAC/XX/98/Inf.5.

Fishing gear selectivity

12. There had been no action in the intersession due to the heavy workload of the Convener, W.L.T. Densen (Netherlands). The Working Party on Fishing Gear Selectivity was disbanded but the work on gill-netting for roach which has been completed (COPLAKE) should be published. Mr R. Müller (Switzerland) offered to carry out the task of ensuring that an appropriate report was produced. The Convener and the Working Party were thanked.

Eels

 13. The Second Session of the Joint EIFAC/ICES Working Group on Eel took place from 23 to 27 September 1996 in IJmuiden (Netherlands). Subsequently, members of the Working Party had been very busy. Since the production of the Report of the Working Group (EIFAC Occasional Paper No. 33) an EU Concerted Action on enhancement and conservation of eel had produced a report on "Management of the European Eel" which was published by the Marine Institute (Ireland) and which had been delivered to the EU. This had formed the basis of a presentation made by W. Dekker (Netherlands) to ICES.

14. An e-mail network on eels has been set up to promote the exchange of information.

15. The Working Party will continue on an ad hoc basis and intends to convene an International Symposium on Anguillid Eels in Denmark during autumn 1999.

Electric fishing

16. Progress on best practice guidelines had been delayed pending the proposed work of the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) on electric fishing working practices. In view of the importance of monitoring under the EU Water Framework Directive, it was agreed that the Working Party on Electric Fishing, on an ad hoc basis, should contribute to the work of the CEN and seek formal involvement in the process. Accordingly, the EIFAC Secretariat was asked to correspond with CEN and I. Cowx (UK) was requested to participate in the forthcoming CEN Workshop on Fish Monitoring - Fishing with Electricity (September 1998) as an EIFAC representative subject to receipt of an appropriate invitation.

Introductions and stocking

17. Delegates were encouraged to visit the new internet Web Site on Stock Enhancement (http://www.efan.no/was).

18. The issue of crayfish plague was raised. Ninety percent of the European harvest of crayfish now comprises North American species, with over ten countries having Procambarus clarkii present. The forthcoming twelfth meeting of the World Association of Astacology will address this issue.

19. Concern was expressed that ballast water exchange can lead to alien introductions. It was requested that the Ad hoc Working Party on Introductions and Stocking instigate liaison with the Joint ICES-IMO-IOC Working Group on Ballast Water and Sediments and with the ICES Working Party on Introduced Species and Transfers to ensure alignment of codes relating to ballast water. Mr I. Cowx (UK) was asked to make contact with the Chairmen of the other groups and report to the next intersessional Executive Committee Meeting. Mr P. Tuunainen (Finland) was asked to represent EIFAC at the next meeting of the ICES Working Party on Introduced Species and Transfers. The meeting also requested that the observer from ICES clarify the prospective involvement of EIFAC.

Brackishwater fisheries and aquaculture

20. It was agreed to disband the Working Party on Brackishwater Fisheries and Aquaculture. The Convener, V. Dimitriou (Greece) had expressed the wish to resign. Members of the Working Party were thanked for work previously carried out.

Synopsis on alosa alosa and alosa fallax

21. The production of the report had been delayed because of pressure of work on the principal author, M. Aprahamian (UK). The Sub-Commission I Chairman, T. Brenner (Germany) was asked to continue to encourage publication of the report.

Maps of fish distribution and aquatic habitat quality

22. Following the Recommendations of the Nineteenth Session of EIFAC a number of fish and aquatic habitat maps have been received by the Secretariat from Cyprus, Germany, Ireland, Italy and Switzerland. It was agreed that the topic retains its importance in view of the EU Water Framework Directive. It was therefore agreed that an Ad hoc Working Party on Mapping of Fish Distribution and Aquatic Habitat Quality be established under A. Lelek (Germany) as Convener.

23. It was agreed that the highest priority should be distribution and diversity, with work on habitat quality mapping to follow at a later stage. It was suggested that outputs should be in electronic form rather than written reports.

24. The terms of reference for the Ad hoc Working Party will be:

(i) to assemble material available in Europe on distribution of fish insofar as it relates to the quality of inland water habitats;

(ii) to maintain a catalogue for EIFAC of material available; and

(iii) to advise countries on preparing such material and to propose a unified approach.

Election of officers

25. The Chairman, T. Brenner (Germany) and Vice-Chairman, M. Marini (Italy) were re-elected and K. Hensel (Slovakia) elected as Rapporteur.

VI. AQUACULTURE (Sub-Commission II)

Introduction

26. The Chairman of the Sub-Commission, H. Ackefors (Sweden) assisted by L. Váradi (Hungary), Vice-Chairman, and J.-P. Proteau (France), Rapporteur, summarized the progress achieved in the intersession on the activities agreed upon by the Nineteenth Session.

Fish diseases and their control

27. It was not possible to hold the meeting on testing and licensing of new drugs in aquaculture which had been tentatively scheduled for Stirling (UK) in May 1997. In the meantime the EIFAC Secretariat, together with the Council of the European Association of Fish Pathologists (EAFP) agreed to hold jointly an open workshop on Health Management of Sturgeon and Carp Fisheries and Aquaculture in September 1999 in Rhodes (Greece). An earlier meeting of the EAFP had been held in Rome at which R. Subasinghe (FAO Secretariat) participated. The Prospectus for this meeting will be made available to EIFAC as soon as possible.

Aquatic resources management in aquaculture

28. As a follow-up to the recommendations of the Nineteenth Session of EIFAC two questionnaires on Aspects of Use of Aquatic Resources in Aquaculture were prepared and distributed to the National Correspondents of EIFAC by the Chairman of the Working Party, H. Ackefors (Sweden). A reply was requested to the first questionnaire by September 1997 and the second by January 1998. Only five questionnaires were returned correctly completed and six others which were incomplete. On the basis of the poor response a meeting of the Working Party, which had been planned for February 1998 to synthesize the replies was cancelled. Mr H. Ackefors (Sweden) undertook to solicit further information on questionnaires that were incomplete and to request submission of completed questionnaires from countries which had not replied. This information should be received by the end of October 1998 and, together with those questionnaires which had been received, used to prepare a synthesis which should be available for submission to the Secretariat by the end of December 1998.

Fish and crustacean nutrition

29. Although the intention had been to publish the proceedings of the Workshop on Fish and Crustacean Nutrition Methodology and Research for Semi-intensive Pond-based Farming Systems held in Szarvas, Hungary, in April 1996 in Aquaculture Nutrition, some articles were published independently in other journals making it impossible to produce the complete proceedings.

Orientation of the Sub-Commission

30. The Sub-Commission examined the orientations proposed by the Nineteeth Session and commented as follows:

- Thrust A addresses trend analysis of the sector and implies improved collection of statistics and other information mainly through questionnaires addressed to the National Correspondents. A synthesis of current trends in aquaculture in Europe and the countries of the former Soviet Union has appeared as part of the Review of the State of World Aquaculture (FAO Fisheries Circular 886 [rev.1]).

- Thrust B addresses technical aspects of sustainable aquaculture which are of concern to EIFAC. The main present area of concern was to identify the reasons why aquaculture development was stagnating in Eastern Europe. Other areas where EIFAC could develop programmes were: the use in aquaculture of genetically modified organisms, processing methods to improve product quality, trials with and authorization for the use of new drugs and the interactions between aquaculture and the environment. The following questions are also important for EIFAC: will water resources be sufficient to meet human needs including food production from inland fisheries and aquaculture in the near future? and how should EIFAC respond to the needs of developing countries? EIFAC should be more active in addressing social, economic and policy issues.

31. It was emphasized that the Commission should identify and concentrate on areas not covered by other organizations working in the aquaculture sector. It was also recognized that EIFAC had a special capacity in working on topics at the interface between aquaculture and inland fisheries.

32. The Symposium on Water for Sustainable Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture was held as part of the Twentieth Session following the proposal of the Sub-Commission.

33. The observer from the Federation of European Aquaculture Producers (FEAP) informed the Commission that its members had a sustained interest in the work of the Commission as the Federation seeks closer ties between the scientific and production sectors of aquaculture.

Programme of the Sub-Commission

34. On the basis of the above the following were retained as priorities for future work of the Sub-Commission:

- Monitoring of important diseases in freshwater fish species and proactive methods for preventing outbreaks of diseases.

- Social and economic issues in aquaculture and fisheries in relation to public opinion.

- Recreational and commercial fisheries and aquaculture in relation to increasing water scarcity.

35. EIFAC National Correspondents should make every effort to improve and increase collaboration and information exchange with aquaculture producers and with private sector organizations.

36. The Sub-Commission should collaborate fully with Sub-Commission IV in the organization of the Symposium to be held in conjunction with the Twenty-first Session.

Election of Officers

37. The following persons were elected: L. Váradi (Hungary), Chairman, Y. Avnimelech (Israel), Vice-Chairman, J.-P. Proteau (France), Rapporteur.

38. The Chairman of EIFAC, C. Moriarty, thanked the outgoing Chairman, H. Ackefors (Sweden), for his valuable contribution to the work of the Sub-Commission.

VII. PROTECTION OF THE AQUATIC RESOURCE (Sub-Commission III)

Introduction

39. The Chairman of the Sub-Commission, R. Müller (Switzerland), assisted by J. Allardi (France), Vice-Chairman, and P. Gérard (Belgium), Rapporteur, informed the Session as to the progress achieved since the last session in 1996.

Accumulated toxicants in fish

40. This activity is convened by Z. Svobodovà (Czech Republic) who submitted a report to the session. Organic pollutant (PCB) and heavy metal (Hg) loads in organs of fish from most waters sampled in the Czech Republic were generally decreasing. However, high concentrations of mercury could still be found in fish from some waters. The session raised the question of the health implication for those who consume high quantities of these fish. The Chairman agreed to clarify this point with the Convener.

41. The Commission considered this activity to be of continuing importance, and that it should focus on mutagenic effects, stress-related parameters and the effects of xeno-estrogenic substances on male fish.

Working Party on Effects of Physical Modifications of the Aquatic Habitat on Fish Populations

42. The manual on river rehabilitation arising from the work of members of this Working Party was published by "Fishing News Books", Oxford, in early 1998 as "Rehabilitation of Rivers for Fish" edited by I.G. Cowx and R.L. Welcomme.

43. A workshop focusing on post-project appraisal of rehabilitation projects was held in March 1998 at the University of Hull (United Kingdom) which presented an overview of remedial actions undertaken in the different countries, assessed the effectiveness of river rehabilitation for fish and fisheries, and reviewed the methodologies used for evaluating river rehabilitation projects.

44. It was recommended that the Working Party continue on an ad hoc basis and that it concentrates its efforts on cost-benefit evaluation of rehabilitation projects including the pertinent methodology, post-restoration assessment, and socio-economic aspects. The Session expressed the wish that problems of excessive growth of exotic and indigenous macrophytes be taken into consideration.

45. The sub-group on "Methodologies for rehabilitation of lakes and reservoirs", convened by H. Lehtonen (Finland), met during the Twentieth Session. It agreed to prepare a manual on rehabilitation of lakes and reservoirs as a companion to the one for rivers. A contents list was agreed for the manual and a number of participants volunteered to prepare individual chapters. The chapter outlines should be submitted to the coordinator Mr H. Lehtonen by the end of October 1998 and the completed chapters should be available by the end of May 1999. The next ad hoc meeting of the Working Party is then envisaged for 1999 to discuss the first drafts of the chapters; if possible, the meeting should be convened in conjunction with a European event in respect to lakes.

46. In view of the importance of the theme and the large amount of work involved, the Session decided that the sub-group be upgraded to an ad hoc Working Party under the same Convenership.

Prevention and control of bird predation

47. The Convener of the activity on bird predation, E. Staub (Switzerland) participated in the expert meeting of the European Action Plan for the Management of the Great Cormorant in the African-Eurasian Region, Copenhagen, September 1997. The Draft Action Plan on the Management of Cormorants was discussed but only four out of 14 participating Range States had sent fisheries representatives. The Action Plan was finally endorsed despite opposition from the under-represented fisheries sector who had tried to agree on quantitative goals for numerically limiting the cormorant populations in Europe.

48. The Commission recommended that fisheries agencies of EIFAC member States prior to endorsing the Action Plan on the Management of Cormorants seek new negotiations on the subject.

49. It was agreed that the development of this important matter in Europe be monitored and a report made for the next EIFAC Session.

Influence of management practices on the environment

50. After repeated difficulties in finding a Convener for this Working Party, M. Aprahamian (United Kingdom) agreed to accept this task in October 1997.

51. The Commission was informed that progress so far consists of a preliminary collection of relevant papers through a literature search. A summary of this should be presented to the next Session of EIFAC. Persons interested in joining this ad hoc Working Party, which operates by correspondence, are invited to contact the Convener.

Programme of the Sub-Commission

52. The Commission took note of the emerging problem of endocrine disruption in fish by synthetic chemicals and reviewed a proposal to set up a new working party to assess the situation in inland fish and fisheries. The issue of endocrine disruptors in the marine environment is being addressed by a working group of the Joint IMO/FAO/UNESCO-IOC/WMO/WHO/IAEA/UN/UNEP Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP). It was therefore felt that EIFAC should co-sponsor this activity, making it a GESAMP/EIFAC Working Group to evaluate ecological and human health effects from endocrine disrupting substances discharged into the aquatic environment. The Working Group would have the following terms of reference:

- prepare a synoptic technical assessment of the consequences to human and aquatic environmental health of the occurrence of endocrine disruptors in the aquatic environment, including oestromimetic substances, using credible scientific and medical information;

- provide an unbiased perspective of the issue, given its recognised complexities and potential for erroneous testing, understanding and response;

- recommend appropriate actions on the issue in the aquatic environment that can be taken immediately by the GESAMP sponsoring agencies and EIFAC member countries.

53. Because of his active involvement in the subject, P.-D. Hansen volunteered to act as coordinator of this activity.

Election of Officers

54. The following persons were re-elected: R. Müller (Switzerland), Chairman, J. Allardi (France), Vice-Chairman; P. Gérard (Belgium), Rapporteur.

VIII. SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC ISSUES (Sub-Commission IV)

Introduction

55. The Chairman of the Sub-Commission, I. Cowx (UK), assisted by L. Kukk (Estonia), Vice-Chairman, informed the Session of the progress achieved during the intersessional period. The Chairman reminded the Session that the need for the Socio-Economic Sub-Commission was discussed in Rome in 1994 and ratified at the Nineteenth Session (1996) in Dublin and thus the intersession was primarily occupied by activities to establish the work programme of the Sub-Commission.

Education in fisheries management

56. The Chairman informed the Session that the original Working Party on Education was disbanded at the Nineteenth Session and replaced by a new Ad hoc Working Party on Communication and Education with the original Convener transferring to the new Working Party. Unfortunately, due to the pressure of other commitments, there was no output of the Working Party.

57. The Session agreed that a new Convener should be sought and T. Brenner (Germany) accepted the invitation to take on this role. Mr C. Moriarty (Ireland) agreed to assist. The former Convener (J. Gregory, UK) was to be thanked for his previous efforts.

58. It was suggested that the Convener attempt to contact the MARSOURCE project of the Maritime Information Society, administered by DG-XIV of the EC, in order to establish links with their sub-project on fisheries and aquaculture.

Recreational fisheries

59. The Convener, P. Hickley (UK) informed the Session that the proceedings of the Symposium on Social, Economic and Management Aspects of Recreational Fisheries, held in Dublin (Ireland) in 1996 were now published by Fishing News Books.

60. He also reported on a meeting of the Working Party which was held on 27 June 1998 to discuss future activities.

61. Work for the forthcoming intersession was identified as falling into three topic areas:

- production of the Code of Practice for Recreational Fisheries;

- a review of the implementation of the recommendations adopted by the Nineteenth Session, and

- promotion and coordination of the year 2000 angling census.

Survey of legislation concerning the aquatic environment

62. The Sub-Commission noted that there were further delays in the collation of the survey on legislation concerning the aquatic environment.

63. The Session was reminded that one of the original aims of the work was to complete a review of legislation to assist Eastern European countries in their restructuring programme, but that the need for this was now past. It was recognized that a considerable amount of work had so far been carried out in collecting reference documents from member countries and that the Code of Practice for Recreational Fisheries required good legal support.

64. It was agreed to cease work on the production of the synthesis on European Fisheries Legislation. It was requested that A. van Houtte (FAO Legal Office) be asked to make available the information so far collated and that the Secretariat continue to be a depository of national legislation.

Resolution of conflicts in river basins

65. The Chairman informed the Session that no formal working party on the topic had been established. However, a need to establish and promote the guiding principles was recognized and a suggestion was made that the attention of member countries be drawn to the output of the recent EIFAC Symposium, held in conjunction with the Twentieth Session in Portugal, and the Symposium on River Fisheries held in Hull (UK) in April 1998.

66. For clarification two areas of potential conflict were noted: that involving international basin management; and that between user groups. The Danube Commission was cited as a good example of coordinated basin management.

67. It was agreed that no formal working party would be established but that the Chairman of the Sub-Commission would continue to hold a watching brief and report to the next Session.

Social and economic aspects of inland fisheries

68. The Session was informed that there were no activities to date but A. Neiland (UK) was willing to act as Convener of this ad hoc Working Party.

69. On the basis that the Symposium to be held in conjunction with the Twenty-first Session of EIFAC ("Fisheries and Society") will address the topic area covered by this Working Party, it was proposed that the Convener be co-opted onto the Steering Committee of the Symposium.

Election of Officers

70. The Chairman, I. Cowx (UK) and Vice-Chairman, L. Kukk (Estonia) were re-elected and M.J. Collares-Pereira (Portugal) was elected as Rapporteur.

IX. ADOPTION OF THE REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE SUB-COMMISSIONS

71. The Commission considered and adopted the reports and recommendations of the Sub-Commissions.

X. ADOPTION OF THE REPORT OF THE SYMPOSIUM

72. The Commission adopted the Report of the Symposium on Water for Sustainable Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture, together with the recommendations presented in Appendix F. In essence, EIFAC recommended that:

- Those in charge of fisheries and aquaculture development seek collaboration with other agencies and sectors of society in order to improve coordination of resource management.

- Governments empower fisheries and aquaculture authorities to promote actively the interests of inland fisheries and aquaculture.

- Greater resources be made available to authorities in charge of fisheries and aquaculture for research to enhance national capacities to formulate and implement management policies.

- Authorities representing inland fisheries and aquaculture management identify groups responsible for the production of river basin management plans and ensure that the needs of inland fisheries and aquaculture are adequately represented in such plans.

- Priority is given to developing and promoting economic and social evaluation of inland fisheries, aquaculture production, fishing communities, fish populations and aquatic environments in general.

XI. SYMPOSIUM IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE TWENTY-FIRST SESSION OF EIFAC

73. It was recommended that a Symposium entitled "Fisheries and Society" be held in connection with the Twenty-first Session of EIFAC. This Symposium should make a broad assessment of social, economic and cultural aspects of inland fisheries and aquaculture in Europe at the end of the second millennium and set out the essential steps to be taken for development into the Twenty-first Century.

74. The Prospectus, Appendix G, should be translated immediately into the languages of EIFAC member countries by the National Correspondents and circulated widely to attract maximum participation.

75. The Prospectus will also be posted on the Internet as part of the EIFAC Home Page.

76. The Commission agreed that papers could be submitted to the Symposium and presented in either English or French but that no interpretation would be provided during the Symposium.

77. Mr M. Sipponen (Finland) agreed to convene and K. Pintér (Hungary) to chair the Symposium.

XII. STRENGTHENING OF EIFAC

Relevance of the Commission

78. It was recognized that the Commission continues to be relevant and active with continuing voluntary contributions by its members to the various activities.

Communication

79. The Session agreed that the interests of inland fisheries were not sufficiently known and taken into account by governments and the public due to shortcomings in communication on the part of the fisheries and aquaculture sectors. While this was a general problem, EIFAC could contribute to raising awareness through the following mechanisms:

EIFAC Home Page

80. The EIFAC Internet Home Page was established following the recommendation of the Nineteenth Session . This has proved successful in alerting people of EIFAC existence and programme but could usefully be expanded into an improved vehicle for information exchange on inland fisheries and aquaculture. In order to do this all concerned with fisheries and aquaculture in EIFAC member countries should be invited to submit short news items of general interest. These could then be assembled into a Web Site News Page. Mr C. Moriarty (Ireland) and R. Welcomme (UK) agreed to initiate this activity in collaboration with the Secretariat.

(b) EIFAC Newsletter

81. The second issue of the EIFAC Newsletter was published in 1997. It was suggested that this publication, while of great interest to members in reporting progress of EIFAC programmes, could usefully be expanded to contain more items of interest from the member governments and should be linked to the EIFAC Home Page.

(c) EIFAC Leaflet

82. It was agreed that a leaflet setting out EIFAC mission and programmes should be prepared for wide circulation within and outside Europe to familiarize possible collaborators and related interests with the work of the Commission.

(d) Press Coverage

83. Briefing material for the press could be prepared within each country for circulation to appropriate newspapers, journals and special interest publications.

Duration of the Session

84. The Commission recommended that its Sessions, including the associated Symposia, be reduced to five days.

XIII. ANY OTHER MATTERS

Collaboration with other Organizations

85. The representative of ICES, H. Ackefors (Sweden) emphasized the need for increased collaboration between ICES and EIFAC, particularly in groups working on similar topics such as species introductions. Increased collaboration could also be ensured through mutual consultation of Web Sites and direct contact between the Secretariats.

86. Mr P. Tuunainen (Finland) agreed to continue to represent EIFAC at the ICES Statutory Meetings.

87. It was agreed that a link should be established between the EIFAC home page and the home page of the Federation of European Aquaculture Producers (FEAP) which will provide listings of national aquaculture producer associations and cooperatives.

List of European Inland Fisheries Scientists

88. There had been no progress in preparing a provisional list of scientists as suggested at the Nineteenth Session. It was felt that such a list continues to be useful and could form an important part of the electronic network.

XIV. ELECTION OF OFFICERS

89. The following were re-elected as officers of the Commission: C. Moriarty (Ireland), Chairman, M. Bninska (Poland), First Vice-Chairman, K. Pinter (Hungary), Second Vice-Chairman.

XV. DATE AND PLACE OF THE TWENTY-FIRST SESSION

90. The delegate of Hungary invited the Commission to hold its Twenty-first Session and Symposium in Budapest in June 2000. The Commission expressed its gratitude for this offer.

91. The delegate of the UK offered to investigate the possibility of hosting the Twenty-second Session of EIFAC in 2002.

XVI. ADOPTION OF THE REPORT AND CLOSING OF THE SESSION

92. The Report of the Twentieth Session of EIFAC was adopted on 1 July 1998.

93. On behalf of H.E. the Minister of Agriculture, Rural Development and Fisheries, the Director-General of Forestry, Mr Alvaro Branco Vasco delivered a closing speech, highlighting the importance of protecting the quality of inland waters, of promoting inland fisheries and of further developing sustainable aquaculture. The chairman of EIFAC, Mr. Christopher Moriarty thanked the Government of Portugal and their staff for the excellent way in which the Session was organized and serviced. He closed the Session at 12.00 hours on 1 July 1998.

Appendix A

AGENDA

1.

Opening of the Session

2.

Adoption of the Agenda and Arrangements for the Session

3.

Symposium on Water for Sustainable Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture

4.

Review of Rules of Procedure of EIFAC

5.

Sub-Commission I

Review of intersessional activities:

Fishing gear selectivity

Eels

Electric fishing

Introductions and stocking

Brackishwater fisheries and aquaculture

Synopsis on Alosa alosa and Alosa fallax

Maps of fish distribution and aquatic habitat quality

Programme of the Sub-Commission

Other matters

Election of Officers

6.

Sub-Commission II

Review of intersessional activities:

Fish diseases and their control

Aquatic resources management in aquaculture

Fish and crustacean nutrition

Programme of the Sub-Commission

Other matters

Election of Officers

7.

Sub-Commission III

Review of intersessional activities:

Ad hoc Expert Consultation on Accumulated Toxicants in Fish

Working Party on Effects of Physical Modifications of the Aquatic Habitat on Fish Populations

Prevention and control of bird predation

Influence of management practices on the environment

Programme of the Sub-Commission

Other matters

Election of Officers

8.

Sub-Commission IV

Review of intersessional activities:

Education in fisheries management

Recreational fisheries

Legislation concerning aquatic environment

Resolution of conflict within river catchment

Social and economic aspects for inland fisheries and aquaculture

Programme of the Sub-Commission

Other matters

Election of Officers

9.

Adoption of the reports and recommendations from the

Sub-Commissions

10.

Adoption of the Report of the Symposium

11.

Symposium in conjunction with the Twenty-first Session of EIFAC

12.

Strengthening of EIFAC

13.

Any other matters

14.

Election of EIFAC Officers

15.

Date and place of the Twenty-first Session

16.

Adoption of the Report and Closing of the Session

 

 

Appendix B

LIST OF DOCUMENTS

EIFAC/XX/98/1

Provisional Agenda and Timetable

EIFAC/XX/98/2

Summary record of meeting of the EIFAC Executive Committee, Rome, 29-30 April 1997

EIFAC/XX/98/3

Amended Rules of Procedure of EIFAC

EIFAC/XX/98/4

Summary Report of the Symposium

EIFAC/XX/98/Inf.1 Rev.1

Provisional List of Documents

EIFAC/XX/98/Inf.2

List of Participants

EIFAC/XX/98/Inf.3

Prospectus of the Symposium

EIFAC/XX/98/Inf.4

Analysis of European Catch and Aquaculture Statistics

EIFAC/XX/98/Inf.5

Progress Report, Subcommission I

EIFAC/XX/98/Inf.6

Progress Report, Subcommission II

EIFAC/XX/98/Inf.7

Progress Report, Subcommission III

EIFAC/XX/98/Inf.8

Progress Report, Subcommission IV

EIFAC/XX/98/Inf.9

List of EIFAC Correspondents

EIFAC/XX/98/Inf.10

Opening Addresses

EIFAC/XX/98/Inf.11

Summary Report of Symposium of the EIFAC Working Group on Effects of Physical Modifications of the Aquatic Habitat on Fish Populations, Recreational Fisheries, Resolution of Conflicts with River Catchments

EIFAC/XX/98/Inf.12

Closing Speech

 

Appendix C

LIST OF DELEGATES AND OBSERVERS

 MEMBERS OF THE COMMISSION

ALBANIA

AUSTRIA

Erich KAINZ
Federal Agency for Water Management
Institute for Water Ecology, Fisheries and Lake Research
Scharfling 18
A-5310 Mondsee
Fax: (+43-6232) 384733
E-mail: [email protected]  

BELGIUM

Pierre GÉRARD
Station de Recherches Forestières
Ministère de la Region Wallonne
Avenue Maréchal Juin, 23
B-5030 Gembloux
Fax: (+32-81) 615727
E-mail: [email protected]  

BULGARIA

CROATIA

CYPRUS

CZECH REPUBLIC

Frantisek VACHA
The University of South Bohemia
Research Institute of Fish Culture and Hydrobiology
37005 Ceské Budejovice
Fax: (+420-38) 45146
E-mail: [email protected]  

Libor PECHAR
The University of South Bohemia
Faculty of Agriculture
Applied Ecology Laboratory
37005 Ceské Budejovice
Fax: (+420-38) 45146
E-mail: [email protected]  

Ivana STIBRANYIOVÁ (Ms)
The University of South Bohemia
Research Institute of Fish Culture and Hydrobiology
Laboratory Pohorelice
Vídenska 717
69123 Pohorelice
Fax: (+420-626) 424243
E-mail: [email protected]  

DENMARK

Gorm RASMUSSEN
Danish Institute for Fisheries Research
Dept. of Inland Fisheries
Vejlsoevej 39
DK-8600 Silkeborg
Fax: (+45) 89213150
E-mail: [email protected]  

Annette HOLM SØRENSEN (Ms)
Vejle County
Damhaven 12
DK-7100 Vejle
Fax: (+45) 75835571
E-mail: [email protected]  

Paul LANDSFELDT
Vejle County
Damhaven 12
DK-7100 Vejle
Fax: (+45) 75835571
E-mail: [email protected]  

ESTONIA

Leelo KUKK (Ms)
Fisheries Department
Estonian Ministry of Environment
Kopli 76
EE-0004 Tallinn
Fax: (+372) 630 8040
E-mail: [email protected]  

EUROPEAN COMMUNITY (MEMBER ORGANIZATION)

FINLAND

Pekka TUUNAINEN
Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute
Pukinmäenaukio 4
P.O.Box 6
FIN-00721 Helsinki
Fax: (+358-205) 751201
E-mail: [email protected]  

Harri DAHLSTRÖM
Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry
Department of Fisheries and Game
P.O.Box 232
FIN-00171 Helsinki
Fax: (+358-9) 1604285
 

Pentti MUNNE
Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry
Department of Fisheries and Game
P.O.Box 232
FIN-00171 Helsinki
Fax: (+358-9) 1604285
E-mail: [email protected]  

Markku PURSIAINEN
Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute
Saimaa Fisheries Research and Aquaculture
FIN-58175 Enonkoski
Fax: (+358-20) 5751609
E-mail: [email protected]  

Matti SIPPONEN
Employment and Economic Development Centre for Central Finland
P.O.Box 44
FIN-40101 Jyväskylä
Fax: (+358-14) 4437335
 

FRANCE

Christian COURCOL
Ministère de l'agriculture et de la pêche
Direction de l'espace rural et de la fôret
Sous-Direction du développement rural
19, avenue du Maine
F-75732 Paris Cedex 15
Fax: (+33-1) 49555984
 

Jean ALLARDI
Ministère de l'environnment
Direction de l'eau
20 Avenue de Segur
F-75302 Paris
Fax: (+33-1) 42191333  

Jean-Pierre PROTEAU
CEMAGREF
Unité de Recherche et d'expertise "Ressources Ichtyologiques"
361 rue J.F. Breton
F-34033 Montpellier Cedex 1
Fax: (+33-4) 67635795
E-mail: [email protected]  

GERMANY

Jochen TRAUTNER
Bundesforschungsanstalt für Fischerei
Institut für Fischereiökologie
Wulfsdorfer Weg 204
D-22926 Ahrensburg
Fax: (+49-4102) 98 82 07
E-mail: [email protected]  

Tomás BRENNER
Ministerium für Umwelt und Forsten
Kaiser-Friedrich-Strasse 7
D-55116 Mainz
Fax: (+49-6131) 163526
E-mail: [email protected]  

Antonin LELEK
Research Institute Senckenberg
Dept. of Ichthyology II and Fish Ecology
Senckenberganlage 25
D-60325 Frankfurt/M
Fax: (+49-69) 746238
E-mail: [email protected]  

GREECE

HUNGARY

Károly PINTÉR
Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development
Kossuth L. tér 11
H-1055 Budapest
Fax: (+36-1) 3014781  

Laszlo VARADI
Fisheries Research Institute (HAKI)
P.O.Box 47
H-5541 Szarvas
Fax: (+36-66) 312142
E-mail: [email protected]  

IRELAND

Christopher MORIARTY
Marine Institute
Fisheries Research Centre
Abbotstown
Dublin 15
Fax: (+353-1) 8205078
E-mail: [email protected]  

ISRAEL

Dan MIRES
Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture
Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development
Hakyria P.O.Box 7011
Tel Aviv, 61070
Fax: (+972-3) 6971451
E-mail: [email protected]  

ITALY

LITHUANIA

Laima JAKŠTIENÈ (Ms)
Fisheries Department
Ministry of Agriculture
Gedimino pr., 19
2600 Vilnius
Fax: (+370-2) 391176  

LUXEMBOURG

NETHERLANDS

NORWAY

POLAND

Maria BNINSKA (Ms)
Inland Fisheries Institute
Ul. Oczapowskiego 10
10-719 Olsztyn 5
Fax: (+48-89) 5272505
E-mail: [email protected]  

PORTUGAL

Álvaro Branco VASCO
Direcção-Geral das Florestas
Av.a João Crisóstomo No. 26-28
P-1050 Lisboa
Fax: (+351-1) 3124986
E-mail: [email protected]  

Adelaide MARQUES (Ms)
Direcção-Geral das Florestas
Direcção de Serviços de Caça e Pesca nas Águas Interiores
Av.Ş João Crisóstomo, 26-28
P-1050 Lisboa
Fax: (+351-1) 3124981
E-mail: [email protected]  

Jorge BOCHECHAS
Direcção-Geral das Florestas
Av.a João Crisóstomo No. 26-28
P-1050 Lisboa
Fax: (+351-1) 3156188
E-mail: [email protected]  

Manuel Rodrigues PEREIRA
Direcção-Geral das Florestas
Av.a João Crisóstomo No. 26-28
P-1050 Lisboa
Fax: (+351-1) 3124996
E-mail: [email protected]  

Sofia BRUXELAS (Ms)
Direcção-Geral das Florestas
Av.a João Crisóstomo No. 26-28
P-1050 Lisboa
Fax: (+351-1) 3156188
E-mail: [email protected]  

Teresa CRAVO (Ms)
Direcção-Geral das Florestas
Av.a João Crisóstomo No. 26-28
P-1050 Lisboa
Fax: (+351-1) 3156188
E-mail: [email protected]  

Teresa GUIMARÃES (Ms)
Direcção-Geral das Florestas
Av.a João Crisóstomo No. 26-28
P-1050 Lisboa
Fax: (+351-1) 3124996
E-mail: [email protected]  

Isabel ARROBAS (Ms)
Direcção Regional das Pescas e Aquicultura do Sul
Av. 16 de Junho
P-8700 Olhão
Fax: (+351-89) 706476  

José GUERRA
Departamento de Desporto do INATEL
Calçada de Santana n.o 180
P-1150 Lisboa
Fax: (+351-1) 8852275
E-mail: [email protected]  

João CARREIRA
Coordenador de Pesca do INATEL
Calçada de Santana n.ş 180
P-1150 Lisboa
Fax. (+351-1) 8851561  

Luis VALENTE
Associação Portuguesa de Pesca do Achigã e Defesa da Natureza
R. Rodrigo da Fonseca n.ş 75 r/c D-Sala C
P-1200 Lisboa
Fax. (+351-1) 3865850
E-mail: [email protected]  

ROMANIA

SLOVAKIA

Karol HENSEL
Comenius University
Faculty of Natural Sciences
Department of Zoology
Mlynská Dolina B-1
842 15 Bratislava
Fax: (42-7) 65424138
E-mail: [email protected]  

SPAIN

SWEDEN

Bo HOLMBERG
National Board of Fisheries
P.O. Box 423
S-40126 Göteborg
Fax: (+46-31) 7430444
E-mail: [email protected]  

Hans ACKEFORS
Department of Zoology
Stockholm University
S-10691 Stockholm
Fax: (+46-8) 167715 or 6427464
E-mail: hans.ackefors[email protected]  

SWITZERLAND

Rudolf MÜLLER
EAWAG, Fisheries Section
CH-6047 Kastanienbaum
Fax: (+41-41) 3492168
E-mail: [email protected]  

TURKEY

UNITED KINGDOM

Phil HICKLEY
Head of Coarse Fisheries Centre
The Environment Agency
Arthur Drive, Hoo Farm Industrial Estate
Worcester Road
Kidderminster DY11 7RA
Fax: (+44-1562) 69477
E-mail: [email protected]  

Ian G. COWX
University of Hull
International Fisheries Institute
Hull HU6 7RX
Fax: (+44-1482) 470129
E-mail: [email protected]  

YUGOSLAVIA

OBSERVERS FROM INTERGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS

INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL FOR THE EXPLORATION OF THE SEA

Hans ACKEFORS
Department of Zoology
Stockholm University
S-10691 Stockholm
Sweden
Fax: (+46-8) 167715 or 6427464
E-mail: [email protected]  

OBSERVERS FROM NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS

FEDERATION OF EUROPEAN AQUACULTURE PRODUCERS

Courtney HOUGH
FEAP
30 rue Vivaldi
B-4100 Boncelles
Belgium
Fax: (+32-4) 43379846
E-mail: [email protected]  

SECRETARIAT

FAO Fisheries Department
Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
I-00100 Rome
Italy  

Heiner NAEVE
Secretary of EIFAC
Fax: (+39) 0657053020
E-mail: [email protected]  

Uwe BARG
Fishery Resources Officer
Fax: (+39) 0657053020
E-mail: [email protected]  

Dominique GREBOVAL
Fishery Planning Officer
Fax: (+39) 0657056500
E-mail: [email protected]  

Gerd MARMULLA
Fishery Resources Officer
Fax: (+39) 0657053020
E-mail: [email protected]  

Janet WEBB
Meetings Officer
Fax: (+39) 0657056500
E-mail: [email protected]  

Robin WELCOMME
RRAG
Imperial College
8 Princes Gardens
London SW7 1NA
United Kingdom
Fax: (+44-171) 5895319
E-mail: [email protected]  

Appendix D

ADDRESS BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR FISHERIES, PORTUGAL

MR MARCELO DE VASCONCELOS

23 June 1998

On behalf of my Minister and myself, allow me to welcome you to my country and express the sincere wish that the work of the following days will contribute to open new ways for a more rational and responsible use of water, maybe the most vital resource for life sustainability.

Production in inland waters, particularly in what concerns aquaculture, has been increasing since the mid 80's, being today the main support for the global increase of fish production - which is, as it is known, one of the most important available sources of animal protein for human nutrition.

This is the situation today and most probably for the following years.

However, we know that the scarcity of water is becoming quite troubling to the extent that it has been turned into a tension focus in certain regions, and it would not be excessive to say that its continuous depletion will tend to worsen social and economic situations and to become an excuse for armed conflicts. North Africa and the Near East are good examples of that risk, but they are not the only ones.

On the other hand, and taking into account that the security alert limit is 2000 m3 per capita, certain projections pointing to figures of about 700 m3 by the end of the first quarter of the next century are highly preoccupying. Considering the last 50 years, other forecasts - not necessarily divergent - indicate, for the year 2000, a breakdown in water availability per capita of around 35% in Latin America and Africa, of 30% in Asia and of 50% in North America.

The misuse that has been made of inland waters, their degradation due to pollution caused by urban, mining and industrial effluents and the increasing use for irrigation purposes are three factors that, together with climate change, help to understand the gravity of the situation we have come to.

Several examples show us how we reached this point. We have only to remember what happened to the Danube and Lake Aral - whose surface has been reduced about 40% in less than 30 years, gradually becoming an immense salty area - or the controversy around plans to divert watercourses between watersheds or the effects of dam construction or even the absolutely disastrous ecological consequences of deforestation, previously in temperate zones and today in tropical regions.

The excessive growth of cities is also a justified concern, mainly the uncontrolled geographic expansion of urban areas. According to rather recent projections, this trend tends to worsen in the next few decades - the problems being focused mainly in the third world.

Moreover, the combination of factors, such as the excessive density of human occupation and the need to assure survival conditions for those populations, associated with the deforestation of large areas and overgrazing, has contributed to the progress of desertification, being the disappearance of arable land per year estimated at about 6 million hectares. In the beginning of this decade, some 14 million km2 had turned into deserts and more than 30 million were threatened.

Given these facts - and I did not intend to be exhaustive - I believe it is reasonable to conclude that the use of water and aquatic resources should be a major concern both of the State and its citizens, and that its use, either private or public, should be regulated so that it does not jeopardise both the rightful interests of human populations and the delicate ecological balances.

We know today that the concepts that are the base of industrial development and certain classical economies (and the modern systems derived from it - Marxist, Keynesian, welfare and ultra liberal economies) have widely contributed to the implementation of intensive exploitation regimes, with the consequent overexploitation and near exhaustion of certain resources. They all ignore - as Ponting underlined in a recent book - the problem of resource depletion and deal only with the secondary problem of the distribution of resources between different competing ends.

This leads to a second conclusion: the role of the State and its citizens is here particularly relevant in the conception, development and implementation of feedback mechanisms in order to induce compatibility between resource exploitation limits and human needs.

Most of the problems we are facing today cannot be solved unilaterally; on the contrary, they demand a sharper collective awareness and a joint effort, at the national, regional and international level. This effort should be all the more bigger as we are facing a situation where, in many cases, water and aquatic resources are an each time more rare asset.

Up to this point I have focused on external factors which, while playing a negative role, contribute to strong limitations in water quantity and quality. Now allow me a brief analysis of the problem from another angle.

In fact, while pollution contributes to the impoverishment of fisheries in inland waters, of no less importance is the introduction of non-indigenous or exotic species, with fatal consequences, in a large number of cases, such as the reduction in biodiversity, the introduction of diseases, the increase in mass mortality, the decline of indigenous communities and the disturbance of the existing balances.

Another aspect - not less relevant - is related to the development of semi-intensive and intensive aquaculture systems, which led to higher pollution levels due to an excess of nutrients.

In general, we could conclude that the quick expansion of aquaculture during the 70's and 80's is not sustainable and requires a joint effort in finding new ways, based on unconventional strategies, such as LISA models (i.e. Low Input Sustainable Aquaculture models based on communities) or, in a wider sense, ecological aquaculture systems based on an integrated production perspective that takes into due account the ecosystem's characteristics and its relative fragility.

This means, among other aspects, the need to rehabilitate the ecosystem, the involvement of local populations in the development of projects and a better use of the natural production potential of each region - based on the valorisation of indigenous species and on a rural development concept which presupposes a better articulation of traditional production sectors.

As Schumacher underlined in the 70's, there is a need for a different approach, looking at the whole rather than the parts, and "... concentrating on questions of the appropriate size and scale for both activities and technology and identifying the real needs of people rather than pursuing absolute levels of production ..."

Ladies and Gentlemen,

This speech is becoming too long, so, allow me to end by stressing what I believe, as a biologist, is more important, among so many other issues that aquaculture faces today:

- the fulfilment of mankind's growing nutritional needs, in terms of fish consumption, will depend greatly on the development of aquaculture;

- such growth is limited because there is a maximum natural output level for productive systems, and this is one of the reasons why one of today's big challenges is related to the need to balance those limits with consumption needs, bearing in mind, however, that the exploitation regimes are characterised by high levels of energy loss;

- the possible development level for aquaculture and inland fisheries will, however, be reduced if water quality and biodiversity go on being threatened by pollution of anthropogenic origin, particularly the one that results from agricultural and industrial activities;

- the formulation of new strategies in the scope of aquaculture should consider different approaches to the problems, developing new concepts each time closer to ecological aquaculture models;

- the more rational and responsible use of water implies not only the search for balances among different users, but also the application of regulatory mechanisms in order to compatibilize natural production limits with human needs, knowing that those cannot be overreached if we want to assure sustainability;

- the participation of citizens and communities, as well as their co-participation and/or co-responsibilisation should be stimulated and, in due time, assured, as well as effective co-operation at regional and international level.

Concluding, I shall say that problems concerning water and the sustainable development of fisheries and aquaculture will hardly be solved if we do not seriously face the need to rethink the development models and exploitation regimes for natural resources.

As long as we are driven by purely economic criteria and are not capable of working together in terms of regional and international co-operation, it will be highly probable that today's worries will worsen in the near future.

It is not possible to persist either adopting economic thoughts that fail to take into account humanity's dependence on the natural world or the dominance of reductionist modes of scientific thinking that overlooks the perception of the whole.

In this sense I feel tempted to conclude quoting Hazel Henderson who, with a certain touch of irony, emphasised, exactly 20 years ago:

"... Economics has enthroned some of our most unattractive predispositions: material acquisitiveness, competition, gluttony, pride, selfishness, shortsightedness, and just plain greed ..."

Are we prepared and willing to change this not very sympathetic perspective?

 

Appendix E

 ADDRESS BY THE CHAIRMAN OF EIFAC

MR CHRISTOPHER MORIARTY, IRELAND

23 June 1998

Secretary of State, distinguished delegates, dear friends and colleagues,

It is my great pleasure to welcome you to the Twentieth Session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission and to the related Symposium on Water for Sustainable Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture in this beautiful setting at Praia do Carvoeiro.

On behalf of all of us, I would like to ask you, Secretary of State, to convey to your government our gratitude for your kind invitation to hold the Twentieth Session here in Portugal and to thank the Director of the Direcção Geral das Florestas for making his staff available to effect all the excellent preparations for our meeting. And I am pleased to welcome the Representative of the Regional Governor of Faro.

As it happens, I have a particular interest in some of the work carried out in Portugal in inland fisheries, through my own speciality of eels. Portugal hosted the Eighth Session of the EIFAC Working Party on Eel in Porto 1992 and I have since had the pleasure of working with colleagues in Lisbon and Porto who are making a very valuable contribution to this subject.

Our hosts have prepared an interesting document on the management of water resources and fisheries. These reflect the concerns of all of our countries, particularly the need for sustainable exploitation and the resolution of conflicts between the different users of the resource. The area of water totals some 150,000 hectares. Sport fishing is deservedly popular and makes a signficiant contribution to tourist income and there are as many as 3,000 professional anglers.

EIFAC was set up in the 1950s and held its first session in Dublin in 1960. In those four decades there have been many changes. In the early years, fewer workers were engaged in the field of inland fisheries and its associated disciplines of managemenet of the aquatic resource. The ideals of conservation and the sustainable use of our natural resources were not widely accepted.

The change in outlook in these matters has been dramatic and one of its side issues has been the proliferation of national and international organizations. One result of this has been that the individual scientist finds it harder and harder to decide on where his priorities should lie and how much time and effort he can devote to any particular organization or project. We must now face the questions: is there still a need for EIFAC and, if there is, what steps must we take to convince our colleagues and those who provide the funds that we are worthy of their time and their money.

As good scientists, we approach any problem first by reviewing its history. At the Eighteenth Session in Rome in 1994, we made a careful study of the breadth of the activities of the Commission and made recommendations for the future. To a considerable extent, we carried on our work according to the traditional plan, holding the Nineteenth Session in Dublin two years later and agreeing on work to be done during the next Intersessional. I will now present the traditional review of that work. You will find it in some ways a matter for heart-searching rather than an impressive report of accomplishments.

First we have Sub-Commision I on Biology and Management:

The Working Party on Eel, which is now a joint group with ICES, had a very successful meeting in the Netherlands hosted by the RIVO laboratory at IJmuiden. The attendance was 41 and 32 of the participants presented papers. The Eel Working Party is to a great extent a mini-symposium but has served the topic group very well by its practice of publishing most of the papers as journal literature. Recruitment to the fishery has been poor for nearly twenty years, but the Working Party has provided ample evidence that redistribution of the stocks to maintain or even increase the fishing yield is possible. For its next meeting in Denmark in the autumn of 1999, the Group intends to organize a world-wide symposium on the Anguillid eels.

The Working Group on Electric Fishing abandoned its attempts to hold a Workshop on Harmful Effects of Electric Fishing but still hopes to publish a literature review on the subject.

The Working Party on Fishing Gear Selectivity has failed to find a convenor and has not met.

The Working Party on Introductions and Stocking has published the Proceedings of its Conference held in Hull in April 1996 but failed to hold a proposed meeting in Trieste in 1997.

The Working Party on Brackishwater Fisheries and Aquaculture has not met since February 1996.

The Synopis on Alosa alosa and Alosa fallax is still awaited after many years of gestation.

Maps on Fish Distribution and Aquatic Habitat Quality were requested from all 32 member countries and 5 replies were received. A comprehensive database on these subjects for Europe would be of immense value and the project is to be pursued at this Session.

Next, Sub-Commission II - Aquaculture:

The Working Party on Fish Diseases and their Control failed to meet, but their convener made contact with the European Association of Fish Pathologists and they agreed to hold a joint FAO/EIFAC/EAFP open workshop on Health management of sturgeon and carp fisheries and aquaculture in September of this year.

The Working Party on Fish and Crustacean Nutrition failed to organize a proposed training course because of lack of funding.

We are about to enjoy the outcome of the preparations made by the Working Party on Aquatic Resources Management in Aquaculture in the Symposium which begins later this morning. The very good attendance is a tribute to the work of the convener and his colleagues. But I have to say that their work was not easy. In particular, they issued a questionnaire to all 32 member countries and, in spite of many reminders and cajolements, received 15 replies.

Sub-Commission III - Protection of the Aquatic Resource:

The Working Party on the influence of management practices on the environment has been preparing a document summarizing the literature on this topic: it will be presented to the Session.

The Working Party on the Effects of Physical Modifications of the Aquatic Habitat on Fish Populations has taken the very important step of publishing a volume on Rehabilitation of rivers for fish. This represents the concerteted efforts of the leading experts. The production of authoritative works such as this is one of the most valuable contributions EIFAC can make to the management of fisheries. A sub-group of the Working Party is engaged in planning a similar document on the rehabilitation of lakes and reservoirs.

Rather than a Working Party, the Sub-Commission has an ad hoc Expert Consultation on Accumulated Toxicants in Fish. Thanks largely to the efforts of its convener in the Czech Republic, the group is active in coordinating results of work in progress in assessment of a variety of toxicants.

Members of the Working Party on Prevention and Control of Bird Predation contributed to an expert meeting on cormorant management held in Copenhagen in September 1997. This remains an extremely difficult and sensitive problem, with a degree of conflict between fisheries and wildlife lobbies. Documentation was circulated to EIFAC National Correspondents.

Endocrine disrupters are a new problem relating to the welfare of trout stocks in a number of member countries and the Sub-Commission is considering the possibilities of making a contribution to its evaluation and control.

At the Nineteenth Session in Dublin in 1996, we established a fourth Sub-Commission to deal with social and economic issues:

This Sub-Commission's Working Party on Recreational Fisheries was the group behind our last Symposium. I am delighted to report on the appearance of EIFAC's second major publication of the intersessional entitled: Recreational fisheries: social, economic and management aspects. With this as a base, the Working Party will give its attention to the need for a new approach to the topic which is one of ever-increasing importance.

The Working Party on Education in Fisheries Management covers one of the subjects which all members of EIFAC agree to be of prime importance. But the Working Party has not met for many years and the recommendation of the EIFAC Executive Committee has been that it be abolished.

The topic of resolution of conflicts in river basins has been addressed at a Symposium on River Fisheries in Hull, UK earlier this year and will receive further consideration in our Symposium this week.

And finally, I regret to report no progress in the compilation of a database on social and economic information nor in the matter of a synthesis on fisheries legislation

I have spent a considerable amount of time on this outline, but many of you know little more about EIFAC than its function as the Convener of this Symposium and you will leave us on Friday without hearing anything more about the life and functions of EIFAC. You are now aware that members of EIFAC are very actively and effectively engaged in studies of 11 topics, all of them essential to the development of inland fisheries.

Will you Symposium participants please pay less attention to the fact that I listed eight equally important topics on which we have made no progress. This is a serious matter for those of us who will take part in next week's session. That will be the time for us to fulfil our duty of laying down the programme in the first place for the next two years. But let us remember that the next Session will be the first of the new millennium. Our past has been one of great achievement - but it is quite clear that we must make considerable changes in our outlook if we are to survive far into the future.

In the first place it must be said that many of our resolutions have been aspirations rather than practical advice. Secondly, FAO has less and less funds for our support and has presented us with a document proposing revised Rules of Procedure which will require a degree of streamlining of our operations. Thirdly, the employment situation of most of our members has changed radically, with the effect that few of us have the freedom to devote time to EIFAC because of the pressure on all institutions to achieve tightly focused objectives.

Above all we must remember that inland fisheries are at a crossroads. More and more interest groups are concerned with the better use of inland waters. Much damage was done in the past, most countries are now very actively engaged in repairing that damage. There are differences between the desires of the fishing interests and of other recreational and industrial users of water - even between fishing interests and the anti-fishing lobby. Europe needs an organization which can put the case of the fisheries forward clearly and on a basis of scientific knowledge. That organization is EIFAC - but we must make sure that we are heard.

While we know that EIFAC makes an invaluable contribution to the development of inland fisheries, there is reason to believe that many of our employers and policy-makers need to be convinced of our abilities. At a practical level, we need to identify clearly the cost-effectiveness of our contribution so that contracts for development work will include a provision for EIFAC participation.

What we offer is an unequalled network of expertise which can be fed in to every conceivable national or regional project. The important point is for us to find ways and means of making both our member governments, together with international bodies such as the European Union, aware of our abilities. In the past there was relatively little need for such an approach - but the times they are changing.

And on the subject of change, I must give special mention to one individual. Robin Welcomme is here amongst us and will be working so hard that nobody might notice he has retired. In fact Robin did retire formally last year from the post of Secretary of EIFAC which he had filled with such distinction and good humour for the past ten years. I am very happy to say that, as a Visiting Professor at Imperial College in London, he is continuing to make a major contribution to fisheries and fisheries science. Robin's place at the table has been taken by Heiner Naeve whom we welcome to his first Session of EIFAC and who has been busily engaged behind the scenes for many months.

It is usual for the Chairman of EIFAC to end his address simply with good wishes for the success of the Symposium. I would like to compliment the organizers, both the technical planners and the EIFAC and the Portuguese officials, on their excellent progress so far in making us very comfortable here by the seaside. I am sure the Symposium will be a great success. But I have an addition to my good wishes for the Symposium: that is a request to all colleagues to take the opportunity of our presence here to think and talk about how we make sure that EIFAC has a future even more valuable than its past.

Thank you ladies and gentlemen

Appendix F

SUMMARY REPORT OF THE SYMPOSIUM ON WATER FOR SUSTAINABLE INLAND FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE

Praia do Carvoeiro, Portugal, 23-26 June 1998

1. A Symposium on Water for Sustainable Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture was convened in conjunction with the Twentieth Session of the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission (EIFAC) in Praia do Carvoeiro, Portugal, from 23 to 26 June 1998. The Symposium was convened by Mr R. Müller (Switzerland) and chaired by Mr H. Ackefors (Sweden). The Symposium was attended by 68 participants from 23 countries.

Assessment of quantitative and qualitative characteristics of water resources

2. Ground and surface freshwater resources are finite but demand on them from various sectors and interests in society is increasing. Growing scarcity is therefore leading to competition between the various users including fisheries and is becoming a major issue in Europe and elsewhere. The intensification of use is also leading to greater pressure on water quality through pollution and eutrophication.

3. It was concluded that inland fisheries planners and administrators need to participate pro-actively in fora at all levels concerned with the allocation of water and management of living aquatic resources. Such participation is necessary to:

(i) ensure that water is assigned for the maintenance of aquatic ecosystems and living organisms. Such allocation should include criteria for water use, including quantity, quality and timing which should be established on the basis of scientific evidence;

(ii) ensure that the aquaculture sector is not penalized by unrealistic requirements for effluent quality. It was recognized that for its part the aquaculture sector would need to be responsible in its approach to improving the quality of its discharges;

(iii) limit the potential damage resulting from introductions and transfers of exotic fish, and other animals and plants within the inland waters of Europe; and

(iv) promote awareness and knowledge of the social, economic and environmental significance of inland fisheries and aquaculture among decision makers and stakeholders at all levels.

Water requirements of inland aquaculture systems

4. Aquaculture was established originally in regions where water resources were readily available but supplies are now becoming a limiting factor in some areas due to population increase, industrialization, environmental concerns and other factors. Several fish farms have had to convert from production to nature conservation or recreational areas. Other intensive fish farms are also having problems in the disposal of their effluents. Despite these difficulties, the need for fish as healthy food is increasing, and efforts are being made in many countries to increase the proportion of fish in the diet. However, given current circumstances, studies and trend analyses indicate that some conventional aquaculture systems need to evolve and adapt to changing social, economic and environmental conditions in many European countries.

5. Aquaculture must be accepted and legally recognized as a legitimate user of water.

6. The availability of freshwater resources for aquaculture production will continue to decrease in the future but new methods and production systems are available for the more efficient use and protection of those water resources that remain. While there is little need to introduce these into many countries at present, medium- and long-term planning of aquaculture development should consider their potential for the future. Research and development of new types of water efficient fish production systems should get priority in formulating R&D programmes.

7. The possibility of integrating aquaculture into irrigation systems should be considered as an option for improved efficiency of water use. However a flexible approach is suggested which uses all types of habitat created by existing agronomic practices, the hydrological cycle and the features of the landscape. The principle of integration may also be applied on a wider scale, and more active collaboration among the various water users, planners and administrators is necessary. Collaboration between countries in which water shortage already exists and where such problems are anticipated in the future should also be promoted in order to exchange information and execute joint projects.

Water requirements for inland fisheries

8. Fisheries scientists have an acceptable level of knowledge on the theoretical water quantity and quality requirements for fish for many aquatic ecosystems. Increasing pressures on water resources, coupled with a heightened public demand for truly sustainable development, means there are now key cross-disciplinary considerations related to the need to manage the environment as a whole. There is an increasing need for a better understanding of the different demands placed on the aquatic system and how these demands relate to one another. There is also a need for improved communication and acceptance of how the requirements of one user will modify and compromise those of another.

9. Water resources are generally under pressure under existing demand regimes. There is significant scope for reducing demand and managing impacts in order to comply with new environmental awareness. Given current levels of demand it will not always be possible to protect the environment fully, but the appraisal process must be carried out so as to balance priorities and apply mitigation measures.

10. Current knowledge is sufficient for technical interventions to mitigate continuing damage by other users or to rehabilitate impacted systems. Public incapacity to improve the aquatic system lies more in the sphere of policy making and allocation among different user groups. The new need is for political processes that will facilitate compromise by stakeholders and favour integrated resource management.

11. Fishery scientists should continue to build understanding of the impacts of hydrological change on fish communities. Robust environmental appraisal processes must be carried out to properly balance resource priorities, guide decisions on allocation and on any mitigation measures that may be necessary.

12. It is important that concepts of social and economic value and use are developed for inland fisheries so that fisheries interests can be properly represented in the allocation debate. Collaboration with local stakeholders and with other groups expressing public concern for the environment should be sought in order to influence planners and politicians.

13. Stocking of new species in stressed systems may provide alternative fishery resources but potential risks to the wider environment should be carefully considered and the appropriate guidelines respected.

Water resources issues and conflicts

14. Increasing demand for aquatic resources by a diverse array of user groups has resulted in environmental degradation, loss of habitat and conflict between various stakeholder groups. The mechanisms for assessing the impact of various activities are reasonably well established but overcoming the problems is still complex. This is because mechanisms for resolving conflicts within fisheries and between fisheries and other users are only now being developed. The key problem to be addressed is the promotion of sustainable use of water resources at an optimal level of exploitation, acceptable to all users whilst maintaining the potential to meet the needs and expectations of future generations.

15. If aquatic resources are to be exploited on a sustainable basis in the future, concerted effort is needed to resolve the conflicts between user groups. Where possible, this must be based on available scientific evidence, close liaison between user groups, full cost-benefit analysis and transparency in the decision-making process. If this is to be successful it must involve cross education of all user groups, recognition of stakeholder participation and needs, and be implemented at the local community level. It is recommended that aquatic resource planning and management tools such as the river basin management plans being developed by the European Union member countries be used to facilitate the process of integrated water resource management.

16. The proper representation of fisheries requires improved long-term trend analysis, and assessment of economic and social value of fisheries and associated externalities. It is recommended that priority be given to developing and promoting economic evaluation of inland fisheries and marketing of its products. There is also the need for robust methods for prioritizing demands for aquatic resources, which balance human requirements against the protection of the environment and biodiversity.

Strategic planning of water resources

17. World food production has to be increased over the next three decades to satisfy the additional demands of a world population, which is expected to grow to about eight thousand million by 2025. It is not anticipated that substantial increases in supply can be obtained from oceanic fisheries. Therefore, any future growth in fish protein supply will have to come from aquaculture and enhancement of wild fisheries. In view of the problems of water supply caused by growing demand existing aquaculture production using conventional methods is likely to be endangered. Those responsible for the inland fisheries and aquaculture sectors in Europe and elsewhere must take part in the wider discussions and decisions concerning future water resources allocation and water quality management.

18. It was concluded that:

(i) EIFAC member countries should be aware of a growing demand for fish in the near future that cannot be filled by catches from the sea or from natural inland waters;

(ii) against the background of growing world population future demand for fish will have to be satisfied through aquaculture and fish stock enhancement;

(iii) therefore those responsible for decisions on ground and surface water allocation and management at all administrative and technical levels must make adequate water available for aquaculture and for maintenance of quantity and timing of stream flows;

(iv) greater efforts in the development of more efficient purification systems are needed to protect ground and surface water from unacceptable pollution deriving from urban and industrial drainage systems; and

(v) there should be a comparable emphasis on river and lake rehabilitation and improvement to maintain and enhance valuable recreational, commercial and subsistence fisheries.

Conclusions and Recommendations

19. The participants at the Symposium on Water for Sustainable Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture proposed the following recommendations for adoption by the Twentieth Session of EIFAC:

(a) Authorities and those in charge of fisheries and aquaculture development must seek collaboration with other agencies and other sectors of society in order to improve coordination of resource management.

(b) It is vital that governments empower fisheries and aquaculture authorities to promote actively the interests of inland fisheries and aquaculture, as well as adequately participate in resource management decision-making.

(c) Authorities in charge of fisheries and aquaculture need enhanced capacity to implement policies and regulations related to management of living and physical aquatic resources. Greater resources must be made available to these authorities. It is realized that in many cases these authorities lack manpower and financial and information resources to be able to participate actively in intersectoral negotiations and policy-making. There is a need for research and development to fill key information gaps.

(d) There is a need for management strategies for water resources in general that incorporate the needs of inland fisheries and aquaculture. Those responsible for water allocation should consult with fisheries and aquaculture authorities. Authorities responsible for fisheries, aquaculture and water resource planning should collaborate to formulate appropriate strategies, identify options for their implementation and identify key stakeholders who should participate in this process. These strategies must encompass a range of aspects including social, economic and recreational considerations, biodiversity and the wider aquatic environment.

(e) In view of river basin management plans which have to be prepared for a deadline of December 1999 in the EU member states, authorities representing inland fisheries and aquaculture management must identify groups responsible for the production of these plans and ensure that the needs of inland fisheries and aquaculture are adequately represented in the plans.

(f) Key government departments must recognize that inland fisheries have economic, social, biological and other values. For inland fisheries and aquaculture to be properly represented in the allocation of resources there is a need for improved economic and social evaluation of fisheries, aquaculture and associated aspects. It is recommended that priority is given to developing and promoting economic and social evaluation of inland fisheries, aquaculture production, fishing communities, fish populations and aquatic environments in general.

Appendix G

EIFAC SYMPOSIUM ON FISHERIES AND SOCIETY

Social, Economic And Cultural Perspectives of Inland Fisheries

Budapest, Hungary, June 2000

PROSPECTUS AND FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS

The European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission will hold a Symposium on Fisheries and Society in connection with its 21st session in Hungary in June 2000.

Rationale

The value of inland fisheries to the people of Europe needs to be clearly re-stated. The Symposium will assess the contribution of the fisheries and aquaculture sector to providing food, employment and recreation together with cultural values in such fields as ethnology, ecology and bio-diversity. With a multiplicity of social, technical, environmental and political pressures affecting inland fisheries at the present time, there is an urgent need for greater understanding, recognition and communication of the value of fish and fisheries. The principal aim of the Symposium will be to make a broad assessment of the state of inland fisheries in Europe at the end of the 2nd millennium and to set down the essential steps to be taken to for developments into the 21st century.

Themes

The symposium will examine social, economic and cultural aspects of inland fisheries, in accordance with the following themes:

Information Topics

Embraced by the themes of the Symposium, it is anticipated that information will be presented on the following topics:

Call for Papers

Contributions are invited within any of these broad headings. It is suggested that the majority will relate to experiences within countries, both reviewing past and present and predicting future opportunites. Inter-active discussion during the Symposium will lead to a major statement embracing the entire concept of the inland fisheries of Europe. Anyone wishing to present a paper or poster display should submit a title by 31 March 1999 to the Secretary of EIFAC, Fishery Resources Division, FAO, Via delle Terme di Caracalla, 00100 Rome, Italy, e-mail [email protected], fax (+39) 065705 3020.

Papers will be accepted in English or French, the official languages of EIFAC, but no interpretation will be provided. An abstract, not to exceed 150 words, of the proposed contribution should be submitted, preferably by e-mail, by 31 August 1999. The Steering Committee will review all abstracts in relation to the objectives and themes of the Symposium and the authors will be informed of the outcome by 1 December 1999. Successful authors must submit a draft manuscript not later than 1 March 2000.

The Convener of the Symposium is Dr Matti Sipponen (Finland), fax (+358-14) 443 7335.

The Chairman is Dr Karoly Pinter (Hungary), fax (+36-1) 301 4781.

Appendix H

RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE

EUROPEAN INLAND FISHERIES ADVISORY COMMISSION

(as amended on 1 July 1998)

Rule I Membership

1. Membership in the European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission is open to European Member Nations of the Food and Agriculture Organization in accordance with the provisions of Article VI, paragraph 1 of the Constitution of the Organization. Membership shall comprise such eligible Nations as have notified the Director-General of the Organization of their desire to be considered as members.

2. Each Member Nation of the Commission shall, before the opening of each session of the Commission, communicate to the Director-General of the Organization the name of its representative who should, as far as possible, have responsibilities related to inland fisheries.

Rule II Officers

1. The Commission shall elect a Chairman, a first Vice-Chairman and a second Vice-Chairman from among the representatives to the Commission at the end of each session, who shall remain in office until the election of the new Chairman and new Vice-Chairmen at the next session. The outgoing Chairman and Vice-Chairmen shall be eligible for re-election.

2. The Chairman, or in his absence a Vice-Chairman, shall preside at meetings of the Commission and exercise such other functions as may be required to facilitate the work of the Commission. The Vice-Chairman acting as Chairman shall have the same powers and duties as the Chairman.

3. In the event that both the Chairman and the Vice-Chairmen are unable to serve, the Director-General of the Organization or his representative shall act as Chairman, until new officers have been elected.

4. The Director-General of the Organization shall appoint from among the staff of the Organization a Secretary of the Commission who shall be responsible to him.

5. The Commission may appoint one or more rapporteurs.

Rule III Executive Committee

1. The Chairman and Vice-Chairmen of the Commission shall constitute the Executive Committee whose duty shall be to direct and conduct the business and affairs of the Commission between its sessions.

2. The Chairman of the Commission shall be Chairman of the Executive Committee.

3. The Executive Committee shall periodically inform all Members of the Commission, through the Director-General, of any action taken. Such action shall be subject to confirmation at the next session of the Commission.

4. The Chairman of the sub-commissions established by the Commission shall be invited to attend at least one session of the Executive Committee each year for consultations regarding the coordination of activities.

5. When the Executive Committee deals with special problems, the Chairman of the Executive Committee may, in consultation with the Vice-Chairmen, invite not more than two additional members of the Commission to attend in an advisory capacity the meetings of the Executive Committee at which such problems are considered.

Rule IV Sessions

1. The Commission shall hold sessions at such periodic intervals as shall be requested by a majority of the Members of the Commission or considered necessary by the Director-General of the Organization.

2. The sessions of the Commission shall be convened by the Director-General of the Organization, who shall decide on the place where they are to be held, in consultation with the Chairman and the competent authorities of the host country.

3. Notice of the date and place of each session of the Commission shall, at least three months before the session, be communicated to all the Members of the Commission.

4. Each Member of the Commission shall have one representative who may be accompanied by an alternate and advisers. An alternate or adviser shall not have the right to vote except when substituting for the representative.

5. Meetings of the Commission shall be held in public unless the Commission decides otherwise.

6. A majority of the Members of the Commission shall constitute a quorum.

Rule V Agenda

1. The Director-General of the Organization, in consultation with the Chairman of the Commission, shall prepare a provisional agenda for each session of the Commission.

2. The first item on the provisional agenda shall be the adoption of the agenda.

3. Any member of the Commission may request the Director-General of the Organization to include specific items in the provisional agenda.

4. The provisional agenda shall be circulated by the Director-General of the Organization to all the members of the Commission at least three months before the opening of the session.

5. Any Member of the Commission and the Director-General of the Organization may, after the despatch of the provisional agenda, propose the inclusion of specific items in the agenda with respect to matters of an urgent nature. These items shall be placed on a supplementary list, which, if time permits before the opening of the session, shall be despatched by the Director-General of the Organization to all Members of the Commission, failing which the items shall be communicated to the Chairman of the Commission, for submission to the Commission.

6. After the Agenda has been adopted, the Commission may, by a two-thirds majority of the votes cast, amend the agenda by the deletion, addition or modification of any item. No matter referred to the Commission by the Conference or Council of the Organization may be omitted from the Agenda.

7. Documents to be submitted to the Commission at any session shall be furnished by the Director-General of the Organization to the Members of the Commission, the other Member Nations of the Organization attending the session and to the non-member nations and international organizations invited to the session, at the time the agenda is despatched or as soon as possible thereafter.

Rule VI Voting and Procedures

1. Each Member of the Commission shall have one vote.

2. Decisions of the Commission shall be taken by a majority of the votes cast, unless otherwise provided in these Rules.

3. Upon the request of any Member of the Commission, voting shall be by roll-call, in which case the vote of each Member shall be recorded.

4. When the Commission so decides, voting shall be by secret ballot.

5. In addition to the above Rules, the provisions of Rule XII of the General Rules of the Organization shall apply mutatis mutandis.

Rule VII Observers

1. Any Member Nation of the Organization that is not a Member of the Commission and any Associate Member, that has a special interest in the work of the Commission may, upon request communicated to the Director-General of the Organization, attend as observer sessions of the Commission, its sub-commissions or ad hoc working parties. It may submit memoranda and participate without vote in the discussions.

2. Nations which, while not Member Nations of the Organization, are Members of the United Nations, may, upon their request and subject to the provisions adopted by the Conference of the Organization relating to the granting of observer status to nations, be invited to attend in an observer capacity sessions of the Commission, its sub-commissions and ad hoc working parties. The status of nations invited to such sessions or meetings shall be governed by the relevant provisions adopted by the Conference of the Organization.

3. Subject to the provisions of Rule VI, paragraph 4, of these Rules, the Director-General of the Organization may invite international organizations to attend sessions of the Commission in an observer capacity.

4. Participation of international organizations in the work of the Commission and the relations between the Commission and such organizations shall be governed by the relevant provisions of the Constitution of the Organization and the General Rules of the Organization as well as by the general regulations of the Organization in relations with international organizations. All such relations shall be dealt with by the Director-General of the Organization.

Rule VIII Records and Reports

1. At each session, the Commission shall approve a report embodying its views, recommendations and decisions, including when requested a statement of minority views. Such other records for its own use as the Commission may on occasion decide, shall also be maintained.

2. The conclusions and recommendations of the Commission shall be transmitted to the Director-General of the Organization at the close of each session, who shall circulate them to Members of the Commission and to nations and international organizations that were represented at the session and, upon request, to other Member Nations of the Organization for their information.

3. Recommendations having policy, program or financial implications for the Organization shall be brought by the Director-General to the attention of the Conference or Council of the Organization for action.

4. Subject to the provisions of the preceding paragraph, the Director-General of the Organization may request Members of the Commission to supply information in order to keep the Commission informed on action taken on the basis of recommendations made by the Commission.

Rule IX Subsidiary Bodies

1. The Commission may establish such sub-commissions on problems of major importance and general interest.

2. Membership in these subsidiary bodies shall consist of selected Members of the Commission or of individuals appointed in their personal capacity. The designation of the members of the subsidiary bodies shall be made by the Commission.

3. The representative of the Members of the subsidiary bodies shall, insofar as possible, be specialists in the fields of activity of the respective subsidiary bodies.

4. The Commission may decide the convening of ad hoc working parties, either of representatives of Members of the Commission or of experts serving in an individual capacity, in order to study problems that because of their specialized nature could not fruitfully be discussed durint the normal sessions of the Commission. Experts attending such ad hoc working parties in an individual capacity shall be designated by the Commission.

5. The terms of reference of sub-commissions, and ad hoc working parties shall be determined by the Commission.

6. The establishment of subsidiary bodies and the convening of ad hoc working parties shall be subject to the availability of the necessary funds in the relevant chapter of the approved budget of the Organization. The determination of such availability shall be made by the Director-General of the Organization.

7. Sub-commissions shall report their conclusions and recommendations to the Commission. Ad hoc working parties shall report to the Commission or a sub-commission as directed by the Commission.

8. Each subsidiary body and ad hoc working party shall elect its own officers who shall be eligible for re-election.

9. The Rules of the Commission shall apply mutatis mutandis to its subsidiary bodies and ad hoc working parties.

10. Before taking any decision involving expenditure in connection with the establishment of subsidiary bodies, the Commission shall have before it a report from the Director-General of the Organization on the administrative and financial implications thereof.

Rule X Expenses

1. Expenses incurred by representatives of Members of the Commission, their alternates and advisers, when attending sessions of the Commission, Executive Committee, sub-commissions, ad hoc working parties, as well as the expenses incurred by observers at sessions, shall be borne by the respective governments or organizations.

2. Expenses of experts invited by the Director-General of the Organization to attend sessions or meetings in their individual capacity shall be borne by the Organization.

3. Any financial operations relating to the Commission and its subsidiary bodies shall be governed by the appropriate provisions of the Financial Regulations of the Organization.

Rule XI Languages

1. English and French shall be the official languages of the Commission.

2. The Commission shall at the beginning of each session decide which of the official languages shall be used as working language or languages. Any representative using another language than one of the working languages shall provide for interpretation into one of the working languages.

Rule XII Amendment and Suspension of Rules

1. Amendment of, or additions to these Rules may be adopted by a two-thirds majority of the membership of the Commission provided that 24 hours' notice of the proposal for the amendment or addition has been given. Amendments or additions to these Rules shall come into force upon approval by the Director-General of the Organization, subject to confirmation by the Council of the Organization, as appropriate.

2. Any of the above Rules of the Commission, other than Rule I-1, Rule II-4, Rule IV-2 and 6, Rule V-6, Rule VI-2, Rule VII, Rule VIII-3 and 4, Rule IX-5, 6 and 10, Rule X and Rule XII-1, may be suspended by the Commission by a two-thirds majority of the votes cast, provided that 24 hours' notice of the proposal for the suspension has been given. Such notice may be waived if no representative of the Members of the Commission objects.

 

LIST OF EIFAC CORRESPONDENTS

ALBANIA

Aleksander Flloko
Ministry of Agriculture and Food
Directorate-General of Fisheries
Tirana
Tel: (+355-42) 28621
Fax: (+355-42) 27924  

AUSTRIA

Erich Kainz
Federal Agency for Water Management
Institute for Water Ecology, Fisheries and Lake Research
Scharfling 18
A-5310 Mondsee
Tel: (+43-6232) 3847-16
Fax: (+43-6232) 3847-33
E-mail: [email protected]  

BELGIUM

Pierre Gérard
Station de Recherches Forestières
Ministére de la Region Wallonne
Avenue Maréchal Juin, 23
B-5030-Gembloux
Tel: (+32-81) 611169
Fax: (+32-81) 615727
E-mail: [email protected]  

BULGARIA

N. Kissiov
Division Organisations internationales
Ministère de l'agriculture et de l'industrie alimentaire
55 Hristo Botev Blvd.
Sofia 1040
Tel: (+359-2) 9811546
Fax: (+359-2) 9809499/9817955
E-mail: [email protected]
or [email protected]  

CROATIA

CYPRUS

Daphne Stephanou
Department of Fisheries
Division of Fish Culture and Inland Water Management
13, Aeolou Street
Nicosia
Tel: (+357-2) 303526
Fax: (+357-2) 365955  

CZECH REPUBLIC

Jaroslav Oplt
Ministry of Agriculture
Tešnov 17
117 05 Prague 1
Tel: (+420-2) 21812188
Fax: (+420-2) 2181-2989  

DENMARK

Gorm Rasmussen
Danish Institute for Fisheries Research
Department of Inland Fisheries
Vejlsoevej 39
DK-8600 Silkeborg
Tel: (+45) 89213100
Fax: (+45) 89213150
E-mail: [email protected]  

ESTONIA

Leelo Kukk
Fisheries Department
Estonian Ministry of Environment
Kopli 76
EE-0004 Tallinn
Tel: (+372-2) 492 432
Fax: (+372) 630 8040
E-mail: [email protected]  

EUROPEAN COMMUNITY

FINLAND

Pekka Tuunainen
Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute
Pukinmäenaukio 4
P.O.Box 6
FIN-00721 Helsinki
Tel: (+358-205) 7511
Fax: (+358-205) 751201
E-mail: [email protected]  

FRANCE

Christian COURCOL
Ministère de l'agriculture et de la pêche
Direction de l'espace rural et de la fôret
Sous-Direction du développement rural
19, avenue du Maine
F-75732 Paris Cedex 15
Fax: (+33-1) 49555984  

GERMANY

Volker Hilge
BFA für Fischerei
Wulfsdorfer Weg 204
D-22926 Ahrensburg
Tel: (+49-4102) 511 28
Fax: (+49-4102) 988 207
E-mail: [email protected]  

GREECE

D. Kostakopoulos
Ministry of Agriculture
351, Achamon Street
GR-11143 Athens
Tel: (+30-1) 2028898
Fax: (+30-1) 2028898  

HUNGARY

Karoly Pintér
Ministry of Agriculture and Food
Kossuth L. tér 11
H-1055 Budapest
Tel: (+36-1) 3014180
Fax: (+36-1) 3014781  

IRELAND

Christopher Moriarty
Marine Institute
Fisheries Research Centre
Abbotstown
Dublin 15
Tel: (+353-1) 8210111
Fax: (+353-1) 8205078
E-mail: [email protected]  

ISRAEL

Dan Mires
Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development
Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture
Hakyria P.O.Box 7011
Tel Aviv, 61070
Tel: (+972-3) 6971823
Fax: (+972-3) 6971451
E-mail: [email protected]  

ITALY

Sergio Panella
Ministero Agricoltura e Foreste
Laboratorio Centrale di Idrobiologia
Viale Caravaggio 107
I-00147 Roma
Tel: (+39) 0651600178
Fax: (+39) 065140296  

LITHUANIA

Algirdas Rusakevicius
Chief Specialist
Fisheries Department
Ministry of Agriculture
Gedimino pr. 19
2600 Vilnius
Tel: (+370-2) 391183
Fax: (+370-2) 391176  

LUXEMBOURG

Ady Krier
Chef de service
Administration des Eaux et Forêts
Service de la Chasse et de la Pêche
Boîte postale 411
L-2014 Luxembourg
Tel: (+352) 402201
Fax: (+352) 485985  

NETHERLANDS

W.J.M. Muyres
Ministry of Agriculture, Nature Management and Fisheries
P.O. Box 6111
NL-5600 HC Eindhoven
Tel: (+40) 2329189
Fax: (+40) 2329199
E-mail: [email protected]  

NORWAY

Brit Veie-Rosvoll
Directorate for Nature Management
Tungasletta 2
N-7004 Trondheim
Tel: (+47-73) 580500
Fax: (+47-73) 580501
 

POLAND

Maria Bninska
Inland Fisheries Institute
Ul. Oczapowskiego 10
10-719 Olsztyn 5
Tel: (+48-89) 5273171
Fax: (+48-89) 5272505
E-mail: [email protected]  

PORTUGAL

Jorge Bochechas
Direcção-Geral das Florestas
Av.a João Crisóstomo No. 26-28
P-1050 Lisboa
Tel: (+351-1) 3579831
Fax: (+351-1) 3156188
E-mail: [email protected]  

ROMANIA

Dumitru Budescu
Service de la pêche, de la pisciculture et l'industrialisation du poisson
Département des Industries Alimentaires
Piata Valter Maracineanu, nr. 1-3
Sector 1
Bucarest
Tel: (+40-1) 6142210
Fax: (+40-1) 6139483  

SLOVAKIA

Karol Hensel
Comenius University
Faculty of Natural Sciences
Department of Zoology
Mlynská Dolina B-1
842 15 Bratislava
Tel: (+42-7) 60296370
Fax: (+42-7) 65424138
E-mail: [email protected]  

SPAIN

José Luis González Serrano
Secretaría General de Pesca Maritima
Ministerio de Agricultura, Pesca y Alimentación
José Ortega y Gasset 57
28006 Madrid
Fax: (+34-1) 4020212  

SWEDEN

Bo Holmberg
National Board of Fisheries
P.O. Box 423
S-40126 Göteborg
Tel: (+46-31) 7430300
Fax: (+46-31) 7430444
E-mail: [email protected]  

SWITZERLAND

Erich Staub
Office fédéral de  l'environnement, des forêts et du paysage
Division écologie et pêche
Hallwylstrasse 4
CH-3003 Berne
Tel: (+41-31) 3229377
Fax: (+41-31) 3712583/323037
E-mail: [email protected]  

TURKEY

Yilmaz Emre
Hatchery Manager
Kepez Freshwater Fish Production Station
P.O.Box 190
Antalya
Fax: (+90-242) 3326700
E-mail: [email protected]  

UNITED KINGDOM

Phil Hickley
Head of Coarse Fisheries Centre
The Environment Agency
Arthur Drive, Hoo Farm Industrial Estate
Worcester Road
Kidderminster DY11 7RA
Tel: (+44-1562) 68975
Fax: (+44-1562) 69477
E-mail: [email protected]  

YUGOSLAVIA