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Type: Publications
Year: 2016

This guide describes the practical application of FAO’s ‘Save and Grow’ model of sustainable crop production intensification to the world’s key food security crops: maize, rice and wheat. With examples from Africa, Asia and Latin America, it shows how ecosystem-based farming systems are helping smallholder farmers to boost cereal yields, strengthen their livelihoods, reduce pressure on the environment, and build resilience to climate change. The guide will be a valuable reference for policymakers and development practitioners during the global transition to sustainable food and agriculture.

Type: Publications
Year: 2016

The adoption of climate-smart agriculture (CSA) practices requires appropriate institutional and governance mechanisms to facilitate the dissemination of information and to ensure broad participation by relevant stakeholders and targeted beneficiaries. Among the drivers influencing CSA adoption, the understanding of how gender could influence the effectiveness of these instruments is capturing increasing attention in the literature. The aim of this note is to provide some insight on the data and tools necessary when dealing with the analysis of the effects of CSA on food security, focusing on a gender perspective.

Type: Publications
Year: 2016

An overview of FAO's efforts to both respond to and increase the resilience of smallholders’ livelihoods, their communities and countries to natural hazards, food chain crisis, conflicts and protracted crises.

Type: Publications
Year: 2016

The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the effects of climate change on food security and nutrition, intended as its four dimensions, and to explore ways to reduce negative impacts through adaptation and resilience.

Type: Publications
Year: 2015
This paper explores the impact of climate risk on the adoption of risk decreasing practices and other input choices and evaluates their impact on subjective and objective measures of household welfare (namely net crop income and a food insecurity indicator). The analysis is conducted primarily using a novel data set that combines data from the large-scale and representative Ethiopia Socioeconomic Survey (ERSS), 2011/12 with historical climate and biophysical data.
Findings show that there is interdependency between the adoption decisions of different farm management practices which may be attributed to complementarities or substitutability between the practices. 
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