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Extended assessment of land degradation and practical intervention options in refugee impacted areas in Uganda

Extended assessment of land degradation and practical intervention options in refugee impacted areas in Uganda

Full title of the project:

Extended assessment of land degradation and practical intervention options in refugee impacted areas in Uganda

Target areas:

Western and southwestern Uganda.

Recipient:
Donor:
Contribution:
USD 140 000
26/03/2019-31/12/2019
Project code:
OSRO/UGA/902/WBK
Objective:

Expand the rapid impact assessment to cover all refugee-hosting areas in Uganda, including those in the western cluster (Hoima and Kiryandongo Districts) and southwestern cluster (Kamwenge, Kyegegwa and Isingiro Districts).

Key partners:

Ministry of Water and Environment, National Forest Authority and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Beneficiaries reached:

Government of Uganda.

Activities implemented:
  • Used a combination of remote sensing data and socioeconomic data collected through individual interviews undertaken in and around Kyaka II (Kyegegwa District) and Kyangwali (Kikuube District) settlements.
  • Updated the results and conclusions drawn in an earlier assessment conducted in northern Uganda.
  • Delineated and characterized areas of interest (AoI) to study in western and southwestern Uganda (six refugee settlements).
  • Determined refugee and host community wood demand within the AoIs.
  • Developed land suitability maps within the AoIs.
  • Assessed hotspots, land cover and biomass stocks.
  • Assessed linkages between biomass use and resource degradation in the target AoIs.
  • Developed cost intervention options and recommendations.
Impact:
  • Improved data and knowledge on refugee impacts on biomass resources.
  • Aided the Government of Uganda and relevant humanitarian and development partners to formulate policies and strategies to build resilience in both refugee and host communities. This was particularly the case for programming forestry and tree-based interventions in the forced displacement context.