Country information

FAO in emergencies app

Download now!

Search project highlights

Donor
Recipient
Reported date

Connect with us

Emergency seed support to smallholder farmers affected by the El Niño-induced drought in Ethiopia

Emergency seed support to smallholder farmers affected by the El Niño-induced drought in Ethiopia

Full title of the project:

Emergency seed support to smallholder farmers affected by the El Niño-induced drought in Amhara and Oromia Regions

Target areas:

South Wollo Zone in Amhara Region and East Hararghe in Oromia Region

Recipient:
Donor:
Contribution:
USD 330 000
18/03/2016-31/12/2016
Project code:
OSRO/ETH/603/JCA
Objective:

To increase agricultural production at household level to enhance food security and nutrition.

Key partners:

Amhara and Oromia National Regional State Bureaus of Agriculture.

Beneficiaries reached:

16 396 households.

Activities implemented:
  • Targeted four woredas (districts) in Amhara and Oromia Regions based on nutritional vulnerability of the population, lack of coverage by other humanitarian partners and severity of drought impacts.
  • Procured 229.4 tonnes of cereal and legume seed, including barley, maize, sorghum, teff, wheat and haricot bean.
  • Provided 16 396 households (17 percent women-headed) with regionally adapted and drought-tolerant crop seed.
  • Trained 616 model farmers (416 in Amhara and 200 in Oromia) in improved agricultural practices to then share knowledge and skills with local communities.
  • Conducted regular monitoring, evaluation and backstopping activities through the implementing partners, extension workers and FAO staff based at regional offices.
Impact:
  • Contributed to the largest emergency seed response in Ethiopia’s history, enhancing the livelihood security of vulnerable families severely affected by the El Niño-induced drought.
  • Enabled beneficiary households to plant 4 763 ha with the seed received, significantly enhancing their livelihood recovery and improving food security with crops harvested.
  • Supported households to achieve higher yields than average through the provision of improved seed varieties and training on good agricultural practices.
  • Prevented use of negative coping mechanisms among vulnerable households in need of seed, e.g. sale of productive assets to afford planting materials.
  • Assessed that seed aid was of good or excellent quality (96 percent of households) and received on time (90 percent); 96 percent of households were satisfied or very satisfied with the seed and 80 percent of households had some or no problems accessing other agricultural inputs.