FAO.org

Inicio > En acción > projects > Mitigación del Cambio Climático en la Agricultura > Recursos > Artículos
Mitigación del Cambio Climático en la Agricultura

Artículos

Type: Articles
Year: 2015

The world’s smallholder farmers will have to bear the brunt of the need to increase food production for a growing world population. At the same time, the rural population is expected to decline substantially in the coming decades. The only way to master this challenge is with the aid of mechanisation – which simultaneously has to be environmentally compatible, climate-smart, adapted to local conditions and affordable. Can this work?

Type: Articles
Year: 2015

Agroforestry has been identified as a climate change mitigation practice for its potential to sequester carbon. Moreover, it provides multiple co-benefits to farmers, thus supporting adaptation to climate change. Farmer group discussions in the Uluguru Mountains in Tanzania suggest that 77% of trees found in the area provide them multiple benefits, mainly the provision of fire wood (79%) followed by fruits/food (51%).

Type: Articles
Year: 2014

The story of Wilson Mosbei: a farmer-trainer in Kenya. 

Type: Articles
Year: 2014

Development programs have typically neglected uncertainty and variability in terms of outcomes and socio-ecological context when promoting conservation agriculture (CA) throughout sub-Saharan Africa. We developed a simple Monte Carlo-based decision model, calibrated to global data-sets and parameterized to local conditions, to predict the range of yield benefits farmers may obtain when adopting CA in two ongoing agricultural development projects in East Africa. Our general model predicts the yield effects of adopting CA-related practices average −0.60 ± 2.05 (sd) Mg maize ha−1 year−1, indicating a near equal chance of positive and negative impacts on yield. 

Type: Articles
Year: 2014

Legume tree-based farming systems sit at a crucial nexus of agroecological sustainability. Their capacity to support microbial N2 fixation can increase soil nitrogen (N) availability and therefore improve soil fertility, crop yields, and support long-term stewardship of natural resources. However, increasing N availability oftentimes catalyzes the release of N into the surrounding environment, in particular nitrous oxide (N2O) — a potent greenhouse gas. We summarize current knowledge on the agroecological footprint of legume-based agroforestry and provide a first appraisal of whether the technology represents a pathway toward sustainable development or an environmental hazard.

1 2 3 4 5