La resiliencia
FAO continues to support vulnerable farmers in the Syrian Arab Republic carry out agricultural activities safely during the COVID-19 pandemic

FAO continues to support vulnerable farmers in the Syrian Arab Republic carry out agricultural activities safely during the COVID-19 pandemic

14/04/2020

As part of the programme to enhance the livelihood opportunities of smallholders, FAO Syria has been assisting 700 producers in the country to improve the quality and quantity of their vegetable production through nurseries that utilize low tunnels to produce seedlings, which will ultimately be transplanted in fields. This work is ongoing in seven governorates of the country at more than 35 locations.  

This is the first time low tunnels have been used for seedling production at any scale in the Syrian Arab Republic. The tunnels measure 2 m by 10 m, and each one can produce enough seedlings to serve the vegetable production needs of more than ten households. In addition, the nurseries use modern irrigation techniques to promote seedling growth. It is estimated that the benefit to each farmer in terms of additional income derived from vegetable production will be on the order of SYP 1 000 000 (USD 1 951) per year.

This activity is supported by the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development and the Russian Federation. The project began in March 2020, which coincided with the spread of COVID-19, adding complications to distributing materials and carrying out trainings. Nonetheless, FAO has continued to assist vulnerable farmers by building low tunnels and planting seedlings. 

In addition to the provision of tools, equipment and seeds, FAO has conducted field awareness sessions for the farmers to slow the spread COVID-19 by practicing social distancing, sterilizing tools, wearing masks and gloves correctly as a protection measure, and organizing outdoor training sessions to avoid meeting indoors. In addition, FAO is using modern communication applications, such as WhatsApp groups, to exchange knowledge and information on vegetable production.

“Although COVID-19 is initially a global health emergency, we expect the measures to contain the disease to have a major impact on food security through reduced production, disruption of supplies and the loss of income on the part of consumers. That is why resilience projects – which help families accumulate and diversify assets to support their livelihoods – are so important at this time,” said Mike Robson, FAO Representative in the Syrian Arab Republic. Summer vegetable seedlings, including sweet pepper, tomato and eggplant, will be transplanted from the nurseries to fields in mid to late May.  

 

Compartir esta página