inPRESSive

30 Jul 2014
Nepalese trip highlights Foot and Mouth disease danger to agriculture
Australia

David Payten went on a trip to Nepal last March with a group of 100 vets to look into the effects of foot and mouth disease in a country where it is endemic and to learn how to recognise it in infected animals.Foot and mouth disease is a disease which mainly infects cloven hoofed animals (cattle, sheep, goats pigs) although camels can be infected.

07 Jul 2014
EuFMD Real time Training: Farmers key in early foot and mouth detection
New Zealand

Training in Nepal in the recognition, diagnosis,investigation and control of foot and mouth disease including seeing the disease has been invaluable in protecting New Zealand's vital exports.Prevention against one of New Zealand's biggest biosecurity risks -- foot and mouth disease (FMD) -- has been given a leg-up with specialist training in Nepal.DairyNZ veterinarian Anna Irwin recently returned from Kathmandu, Nepal, where she was part of a five-day training camp run by the European Commission for the Control of Foot and Mouth Disease.

01 Jul 2014
Prevention against one of New Zealand's biggest biosecurity risks - foot and mouth disease (FMD) - has been given a leg-up with specialist training in Nepal.
New Zealand

DairyNZ veterinarian Anna Irwin recently returned from Kathmandu, Nepal, where she was part of a five-day training camp run by the European Commission for the Control of Foot and Mouth Disease.She says the experience highlighted the pivotal role New Zealand dairy farmers play in detecting the disease early. <img src="/imagegen.ashx?image=/796815/anna-irwin-looking-at-cases.jpg&constraint=true&compression=80" alt="Farmers key in foot and mouth detection" class="" />

DairyNZ veterinarian Anna Irwin recently returned from Kathmandu, Nepal, where she was part of a five-day training camp run by the European Commission for the Control of Foot and Mouth Disease.

She says the experience highlighted the pivotal role New Zealand dairy farmers play in detecting the disease early.

"I found seeing the disease invaluable," says Anna. "But it also brought home the importance of being alert on farms. Anyone working with livestock on a daily basis is in the best position to be our number one surveillance force."Foot and mouth is one of our biggest biosecurity risks, so we need to be prepared. The quicker something is picked up, the better our response will be." Along with farmers keeping an eye out for signs, their use of New Zealand's biosecurity systems, such as NAIT (National Animal Identification and Tracing), will help prevent an outbreak

24 Jun 2014
EuFMD Real time Training: Radio interviews- The start of cascade training
New Zealand

The EuFMD real time training course in Nepal in June 2014 included Dr Katie Hickey BVetMed MRCVS Adviser Animals, Marine and Food Response | Response | Compliance & Response, Ministry for Primary Industries- New Zealand. This is a radio interview with RadioLiveSport

16 Jun 2014
EuFMD Real Time Training: Tasman nations unite on disease prevention
New Zealand Herald

New Zealand has now joined the well-established Australian FMD training programme in Nepal, which has engaged the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation to provide veterinarians and key livestock industry representatives the opportunity to experience FMD in the field. New Zealand Minister for Primary Industries Nathan Guy and Australian Minister for Agriculture Barnaby Joyce have signed a memorandum of understanding to emphasise the importance of collaboration. "Our No1 plan and focus of much of our biosecurity efforts is to keep FMD out of Australia and New Zealand," Joyce said. "But you can't stick your head in the sand about something this significant, you have to plan for the worst.

16 Jun 2014
EuFMD Real time Training: Vets working and networking in Nepal
University of Melbourne

In response to the risk the Commonwealth Federal Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF) convened and funded a FMD training program for veterinarians in Nepal. Dr Hall was nominated for a place and supported in her travel by the Faculty of Veterinary Science.

Twenty vets from Australia took part in the training program, visiting communities in Nepal with active foot-and-mouth outbreaks.

Dr Hall says they worked in epidemiological and clinical teams, took samples and used the local reference laboratories and ‘penside tests’ to confirm the disease

16 Jun 2014
EuFMD: Real time Training in Nepal:Carter's push for greater foot and mouth vigilance
Daily Liberal

The senior vet at Dubbo Veterinary Hospital said foot and mouth disease is constant in Nepal and he wanted to be prepared if a similar outbreak occurred in Australia.

"An outbreak would, to a large extent, decimate our export agriculture market and would lead to widespread job losses in rural communities," Mr Carter said.

He said the disease would also have an extensive economic impact

04 Jun 2014
New Zealand vet in Nepal for the EuFMD Realtime Training

Ministry of Primary Industries veterinarian Katie Hickey speaks to Rachel Smalley on KPMG Early Edition about a trip to Nepal to research Foot and Mouth disease in case an outbreak were to occur in NZ. This is against the framework of the EuFMD Realtime training course.

14 Feb 2014
Surveillance of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in susceptible wildlife and domestic ungulates in Southeast of Bulgaria following a FMD case in wild boar
Science Direct

Following a foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) case of serotype O in wild boar in Southeast of Bulgaria, notified in January 2011 and eleven FMD outbreaks in livestock, a control and eradication plan according to the EU legislation was implemented. Based on the epidemiological considerations a “Cordon Sanitaire” along the border to Turkey, consisting of a defined infected area (1240 km2) and two areas of risk (2160 km2) was established. Within these areas a total of 812 wild boar, 68 roe deer, 7 red deer and 2 mouflons, hunted between February 2011 and January 2012, were tested for the presence of FMD. No FMD virus could be detected. Seropositive animals were found in wild boar (6.9%) and roe deer (4.4%), most of them spatially clustered around the FMD outbreaks in livestock, limited within a radius of 20 km. The outbreaks in domestic ungulates were controlled in the framework of EU legislation, including stamping out, standstill and no use of vaccination. All villages within the Cordon Sanitaire were examined for the presence of FMD according to the control and eradication plan. Neither clinical signs nor seroconversion was detected and the region could regain its status of FMD freedom without vaccination. The relatively low seroprevalence and clustered spatial distribution of seropositive wild boar and roe deer suggest that the FMD infection in wildlife was mainly a short living event, which failed to develop into a large scale epidemic.

24 Oct 2013
The European Commission for the Control of Foot-and-Mouth Disease: working together to protect livestock

Article on the Russian magazine Agrobezopasnost, concerning the EuFMD. The link is to the Russian magazine; the attached file is in english.

1 2 3 4