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Forty years of natural hazards turning into food insecurity disasters in eastern Africa

Actions to enhance climate-related disaster risk reduction in food security and agriculture

For over 40 years, natural hazards (mainly droughts, floods and landslides) have affected millions of people in the eastern Africa sub-region. The impact of these hazards have been high, continue to rise in frequency and are mostly felt in the agriculture and food sectors. In some other countries of the World with comparable exposure to weather and climate variability, livelihoods impacts are much lower and do not necessarily result in resurgent food insecurity disasters. The major impediments in the subregion lie in the high vulnerabilities and low coping capacities of the eastern African populations, mostly sustaining their livelihoods through rainfed agriculture. This brief examines underlying reasons why a sub-region that benefits from a substantial share in humanitarian assistance for food security is still striving to reduce hunger and poverty caused by recurrent natural hazards. Action and policy recommendations to change this situation are provided.

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Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
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Year: 2017
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Country/ies: Burundi, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, South Sudan, Uganda
Geographical coverage: Africa
Type: Policy brief/paper
Full text available at: http://www.fao.org/3/a-i6921e.pdf
Content language: English
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