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Aboard the Nansen (#EAFNansen)

Is it time already? Wrapping up the first leg of the Nansen voyage!

Let the research begin! Sorting, identifying and researching by species in the fish lab.
Pagellus acarne fish being researched. This fish species’ habitat is along the northwestern and west African coats, all the way down to Senegal.
Magne inputs data into the Nansen’s Nansis database.

It’s hard to believe, but the first leg of the Nansen is quickly coming to a close as our team of intrepid, international scientists steam closer to land – Las Palmas in Spain’s Gran Canaria Island.

It’s been an exciting maiden journey for the Norwegian crew and scientists, working alongside the Moroccan scientists on board this leg of the journey.

It will be a quick stop before stocking up, changing national scientists and already setting out again on Saturday.

New local scientists and a new cruise leader will continue the research on this next leg – conducting research on a Mesopelagic survey.

As this first leg nears an end, these scientists are pleased to return home to their friends and family – and more regular work hours, to be sure – but the maiden voyage of this new Nansen research vessel is a unique experience, and one that will certainly remain with them as they return to their institutes, universities and ministries.

We thank all the Moroccan scientists for having participated in this first leg of the Nansen voyage.

And we hope you, our readers, will continue to follow along on our journey as we work our way down the African coast.

In a little over a week, the Ocean Conference in New York will be examining how to strengthen work on our oceans and countries will identify areas in which they are working towards achieving the objectives of SDG 14 – Life under water.

Here on board the Nansen, these scientists are hard at work doing just that, bringing their new knowledge and research back to benefit their countries.

Thank you all for your dedication to ocean research and your commitment to #SaveourOcean. 

Clearly what your mom told you is true. There are more fish in the sea. Scientists gather fish from the trawl.
Our local cruise leader is hard at work identifying species to record in the database.
Despite the long hours, our scientists clearly enjoy their work in these shiny, new laboratories.

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