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Sustainable Forest Management (SFM) Toolbox

Reducing Deforestation

This module is intended for forest and land managers and stakeholders in all sectors involved in joint efforts to reduce deforestation. It provides specific guidance on the analysis of deforestation drivers and how to address them at different scales, and what forest managers can do within their spheres of influence and control. Readers may find it helpful to read this module in conjunction with the Reducing Forest Degradation module

Colombia has an excellent opportunity to develop a national land-use strategy over the next two or three years that is supported by government, the private sector, and civil society. The likelihood of success of this strategy will be enhanced through a sustained, orchestrated commitment from donor nations that helps to maintain momentum...
This paper assesses proponent activities to address tenure insecurity in light of actions required for effective and equitable implementation of REDD+. Field research was carried out at 19 REDD+ project sites and 71 villages in Brazil, Cameroon, Tanzania, Indonesia, and Vietnam. Results show proponents addressed tenure insecurity by demarcating village...
Important transformations are underway in tropical landscapes in Latin America with implications for economic development and climate change. Landscape transformation is driven not only by national policies and markets, but also by global market dynamics associated with an increased role for transnational traders and investors. National and global trends affect...
Key underlying causes identified in the 2010 report ‘Getting to the Roots: Underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation, and drivers of forest restoration,’ included: persistently high demand for wood; spiralling demand for land for plantations and other forms of agriculture; conflict over land tenure; industrialisation, urbanisation and infrastructure; poor...
Deforestation affects climate change because it releases the carbon stored in the plants and soils and alters the physical properties of the surface. Tropical ecosystems are the most productive, and changes to them are likely to have the greatest impact on climate change. Models predict that their loss will have a...
Dr. Paulo Moutinho, Executive Director of the Amazon Environmental Research Institute (IPAM) discussed Brazil's climate change and deforestation policies in this webinar, which aired February 16, 2012.