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Energy

Increasing resilience in emergencies, protracted crises and rehabilitation

FAO is working to respond to the energy needs in emergencies and protracted crises, particularly in the context of forced displacement, migration and climate change. FAO’s response to the cooking, heating, and agriculture powering and lighting needs of affected populations in emergencies, protracted crises and recovery contexts focuses on ensuring sustainable natural resources management and diversifying livelihood activities. It contributes to FAO’s Strategic Programme 5 on increasing the resilience of livelihoods to threats and crises.

Vulnerable populations, including refugees and Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) as well as the communities hosting them, are often exposed to a range of risks and challenges related to the collection, production and use of traditional biomass.

Safe Access to Fuel and Energy (SAFE)

FAO is a member of the inter-agency SAFE Humanitarian Working Group, along with IOM, UNHCR, WFP and the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves. FAO’s work on Safe Access to Fuel and Energy (SAFE) adopts a holistic, multi-faceted approach which takes into account the mutually reinforcing linkages between energy and environment, nutrition, health, gender, protection and livelihoods. This approach is comprised of three interlinked pillars: 

  1. Ensuring a sustainable supply of energy by promoting sustainable natural resource management, sustainable bioenergy production and the use of alternative and renewable energy sources;
  2. Addressing energy demand through the promotion of fuel-saving cooking practices and fuel-efficient technologies for cooking, heating and livelihood activities;
  3. Promoting sustainable livelihoods, by promoting income-generating activities in both energy- and non-energy sectors as an alternative to selling woodfuel.

Strengthening resilience of crisis-affected populations through Safe Access to Fuel and Energy (SAFE)

Crisis-affected populations – including refugees, internally displaced and the communities hosting them – often have severely constrained access to fuel and energy for cooking, heating, lighting and powering. FAO is working with partners through the Safe Access to Fuel and Energy (SAFE) initiative to address energy needs during emergencies and protracted crises, and to build resilient livelihoods in a sustainable manner.

This publication provides a snapshot of FAO programmes in order to satisfy the fuel and energy needs for cooking, heating and lighting and powering the agriculture sector in a safe and sustainable manner, without fear or risk to health, well-being, and personal security of crisis-affected populations

 

Building resilience through Safe Access to Fuel and Energy (SAFE)

The work of FAO on Safe Access to Fuel and Energy (SAFE) adopts a holistic, multi-faceted approach which takes into account the mutually reinforcing linkages between energy and nutrition, disaster risks and climate change, conflict, health, gender, protection and livelihoods.

This publication presents the key elements of a framework for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) for rolling out work on Safe Access to Fuel and Energy (SAFE).

 

Technical Handbook for Assessing Woodfuel Supply and Demand

This technical handbook is co-published by FAO and UNHCR and presents a methodology for assessing woodfuel supply and demand in displacement settings.

The methodology addresses important aspects of FAO’s efforts to build the resilience of livelihoods by providing guidance on how to map and assess the gap between the demand and supply of woodfuel for cooking inside camps, settlements and surrounding areas, supporting field-based actors and decision-makers on taking appropriate actions.

Case studies

Bangladesh

Bangladesh

In Cox’s Bazar, FAO provides immediate support to address the cooking fuel crisis, which has become a “crisis within a crisis” due to the displacement of Rohingya refugees.

Ethiopia

Ethiopia

FAO is working to sustainably address the energy needs of crisis-affected households in and around refugee camps. This includes surveying and mapping woody biomass resources and assessing woodfuel consumption and energy efficiency of cooking systems in refugee camps

Kenya

Kenya

FAO strengthened linkages and supported dialogue between refugee and host communities in Kakuma and Kalobeyei camps (Kenya) to improve incomes, food security and nutrition.

Nigeria

Nigeria

In northeast Nigeria, FAO is enhancing the resilience of crisis-affected populations. Improved energy access and land rehabilitation are one of the pillars of this approach.

Somalia

Somalia

In Somalia, FAO is supporting energy security and more resilient livelihoods by gradually reducing the unsustainable production, trade and use of charcoal.

South Sudan

South Sudan

In 2017, FAO provided 30 000 emergency livelihood kits to crisis-affected populations comprising fuel-efficient stoves in camps, improvised settlements and host communities.

Sudan

Sudan

In the Sudan, FAO is working to save lives, improve food security and strengthen the livelihoods of South Sudanese refugees and the most vulnerable host community members.

Syrian Arab Republic

Syrian Arab Republic

Due to the ongoing crisis, the high dependence on woodfuel in the Syrian Arab Republic, especially in rural areas, is resulting in an alarming rate of deforestation.

Uganda

Uganda

Land and working rights are granted to refugees. FAO supports the energy needs of refugees and the communities hosting them by reducing the impact of poor energy access on the environment, supporting forestry plantation schemes and mainstreaming solar irrigation for supporting livelihood.

Yemen

Yemen

Acute fuel shortage in Yemen has a deep impact on household livelihoods particularly on health, transport and agriculture.