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Common Oceans - A partnership for sustainability in the ABNJ

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ABNJ DEEP SEA MEETING 2019 - Agenda
Category: Deep Seas & Biodiversity
Type of document: Miscellanea
This is the agenda for The DEEP SEA MEETING 2019, an effort carried out be the GEF-funded Common Oceans ABNJ Deep Seas Project that is jointly implemented by FAO and UN Environment. FAO is also partners with the SponGES Project, which is a research and innovation Project funded under the H2020 Blue Growth initiative. The DEEP SEA MEETING 2019 aims to build on the Common Oceans ABNJ Deep Seas Project and SponGES Project, to showcase existing knowledge, practices, and innovative research for sustainable deep-sea fisheries management and biodiversity conservation in the ABNJ.
ABNJ DEEP SEA MEETING 2019 - Concept Note
Category: Deep Seas & Biodiversity
Type of document: Miscellanea
This is a Concept Note of The DEEP SEA MEETING 2019, an effort carried out be the GEF-funded Common Oceans ABNJ Deep Seas Project that is jointly implemented by FAO and UN Environment. FAO is also partners with the SponGES Project, which is a research and innovation Project funded under the H2020 Blue Growth initiative. The DEEP SEA CONFERENCE 2019 aims to build on the Common Oceans ABNJ Deep Seas Project and SponGES Project, to showcase existing knowledge, practices, and innovative research for sustainable deep-sea fisheries management and biodiversity conservation in the ABNJ.
Connectivity: A critical biodiversity consideration in global ocean sustainability
Category: Deep Seas & Biodiversity
Type of document: Reports
The relevance of connectivity for marine biodiversity has been recognised in the negotiations for a new international legally binding instrument for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity of areas beyond national jurisdiction. This technical brief provides evidence to support future negotiations. It explains how connectivity can be considered in negotiations on three of the four ‘package elements’ of the instrument: area-based tools, environmental impact assessments and technology transfer and capacity building. This technical brief provides an opportunity to consider appropriate ways to include ecological connectivity in order to support the delivery of the ecosystem approach. This brief was produced under the auspices of the ABNJ Deeps Seas Project funded by the Global Environment Facility. This is a 5-year project jointly implemented by the Food and Agriculture Organization of United Nations (FAO) and United Nations Environment Programme (UN Environment) in partnership with regional fisheries bodies, Regional Seas Programmes, the fishing industry, international organziations and governments. 
Workshops to define a strategy to move forward on the use of biodegradable FADs in the Western Pacific Ocean
Category: Tuna & Biodiversity
Type of document: Reports
These workshops held in the Western Pacific Ocean, in Phonpei and Port Moresby the 23th and 28th of January 2019, are part of the research that International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF) is coordinating with support provided by the Common Oceans ABNJ Tuna Project to move towards the use of biodegradable FADs. The initiative addresses some of the challenges facing the fishing sector by implementing best practice solutions to reduce the amount of plastic used to construct FAD´s structures, with the aim to contribute to achieving responsible, efficient and sustainable fisheries and biodiversity conservation.
Deep-ocean climate change impacts on habitat, fish and fisheries
Category: Deep Seas & Biodiversity
Type of document: Technical papers
This publication presents the outcome of a meeting between the FAO/UNEP ABNJ Deep-seas and Biodiversity project and the Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative. It focuses on the impacts of climatic changes on demersal fisheries, and the interactions of these fisheries with other species and vulnerable marine ecosystems. Regional fisheries management organizations rely on scientific information to develop advice to managers. In recent decades, climate change has been a focus largely as a unidirectional forcing over decadal timescales. However, changes can occur abruptly when critical thresholds are crossed. Moreover, distribution changes are expected as populations shift from existing to new areas. Hence, there is a need for new monitoring programmes to help scientists understand how these changes affect productivity and biodiversity.
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