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Global Parliamentary Summit against Hunger and Malnutrition

Figures and tables according to The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2018.

 

This graphic identifies a number of trends, challenges and priority actions along a path towards Zero Hunger by 2030, the end date of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture, Zero Hunger in short, is Goal 2 of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that countries adopted in September 2015 to address global challenges, including poverty, hunger and malnutrition, climate change, inclusive growth and sustainable management of natural resources. Actions to achieve Zero Hunger, SDG2, can accelerate progress in ending poverty, SDG1, and in goals and targets across the 2030 Agenda. The actions presented in this graphic are ordered for design and presentation purposes. They are not intended to be sequential, exhaustive or globally applicable.

The report sheds some light on the nature of the challenges that agriculture and food systems are facing now and throughout the 21st century, and provides some insights as to what is at stake and what needs to be done. What emerges is that “business as usual” is no longer an option but calls for major transformations in agricultural systems, in rural economies and in how we manage our natural resources.

The second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2) is expected to endorse a political outcome document, the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and an accompanying technical Framework for Action to guide its implementation. The Declaration commits countries to eradicate hunger and prevent all forms of malnutrition worldwide – particularly undernutrition in children, anaemia in women and children, among other micronutrient deficiencies – as well as reverse the trend in obesity. It aims to do this by increasing investments in food systems to improve people’s diets and nutrition. The Framework proposes the creation of an enabling environment for effective action and for strengthening sustainable food systems, including through investments in pro-poor agriculture and smallholder agriculture to improve diets and raise levels of nutrition; nutrition education and information; social protection; strengthened health systems for addressing specific conditions; improved water, sanitation and hygiene; and improved food safety.

This infographic highlights the importance of food and nutrition education for healthy diets, and FAO's role and interventions in this area.

 

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