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Programme

FAO Rural Youth Development Programming

FAO's rural youth programming is carried out through field projects, with individual countries and/or several countries together on a regional basis; and through programmed activities which are part of a six-year Medium Term Plan. To better understand the nature of FAO's work, the terms "operational" and "normative" are often used to describe how projects and activities are carried out and their intended outcomes. Rarely do projects and activities exist in the pure form of being exclusively operation or exclusively normative; they are often a blend of the two. Usually projects and activities are referred to as "tending to be more operational" or "tending to be more normative."

Many field projects are considered primarily operational, especially those providing straight forward technical assistance, involving already tested methods and technology. On the other hand, work under the Medium Term Plan is considered mostly normative. Normative work involves the design and testing of innovative methodologies; carrying out research; building databases; and establishing norms and standards. In addition, normative work includes getting the technical information out to end users, in our case, rural youth professionals, volunteer leaders and young people themselves. This can be accomplished through training, newsletters, electronic media, written publications and other documents, such as guides, handbooks, training modules and curriculum materials. Most of the rural youth development field projects include major normative components.

Projects

Many field projects are considered primarily operational, especially those providing straight forward technical assistance, involving already tested methods and technology. On the other hand, work under the Medium Term Plan is considered mostly normative. Normative work involves the design and testing of innovative methodologies; carrying out research; building databases; and establishing norms and standards. In addition, normative work includes getting the technical information out to end users, in our case, rural youth professionals, volunteer leaders and young people themselves. This can be accomplished through training, newsletters, electronic media, written publications and other documents, such as guides, handbooks, training modules and curriculum materials. Most of the rural youth development field projects include major normative components.

  Current Projects

  Country

Project Code

Title

  Funding Source

  Namibia

TCP/NAM/0066 (T)

Training Youth for Sustainable Livelihoods in Rural Namibia

  FAO

  Mali

TCP/MLI/8923 (A)

Stratégie nationale de formation et d'insertion de jeunes dans le secteur agricole et rural

  FAO

  Burkina Faso

BKF/98/006

Appui à la fixation des jeunes dans leurs terroirs

  UNDP

  Cameroon

CMR/99/PO3

Information, education et communication communautaire en matière de santé de la reproduction

  UNFPA

 

Normative Work under the 2002-2007 Medium Term Plan

Starting January 2000, FAO began a new initiative in support of rural youth development programming, Youth in Agriculture, Food Security and Sustainable Livelihoods. Building on previous work, the new plan has three major outputs: (1) strategic actions to promote and support rural youth development worldwide; (2) building human capacity through staff development/training and information/knowledge support; and (3) improving the design and delivery of rural youth development programming. This programme is built on recommendations from the 1995 Expert Consultation on Extension Rural Youth Programmes and Sustainable Development and subsequently influenced by the 1996 World Food Summit.

The plan is ambitious! Only certain areas will be worked on during each of the three two-year planning and budget cycles (2002-2003, 2004-2005, and 2006-2007) that make up the Medium Term Plan. Over the course of the six years, many of these activities will be completed, however some will have to be postponed until partners are found and/or additional funds becomes available.

The major outputs, components and proposed results include the following:

Outputs

Components

Products

Strategic Action for Rural Youth Development

National Youth Policy

Guide for national youth policy development and review teams

Rural Youth Database

Global database of rural youth organizations

Networking and Partnerships

Guide to building national networks and partnerships for rural youth and food security.

Advocacy

Brochures, fact sheets and displays on rural youth and food security.

Strategies for Strengthening and Expanding Programmes

Guide on participatory strategic planning, case studies.

Resource Development

Guide on resource development for rural youth organizations.

Building Human Capacity for Rural Youth Development

Agricultural University Curriculum

Reference on incorporating rural youth development into curriculum of agricultural colleges and universities.

Staff Development and Training

Regional and national workshops; biennial International Workshop for Rural Youth Leaders (Germany).

Information/Knowledge Support

Publish electronic and hard copy versions of YouthWorks; maintain RY Website

Enhanced Design and Delivery of Rural Youth Development Programming

Innovative Media and ICTs

Case studies, guides on youth and rural radio.

Educational Design, Methods and Content

Participatory curriculum development guide; Prototype lesson plans

Youth Employment

Case studies; Guide on selecting and implementing income-generating project and activities

Accessibility of FAO research/knowledge base

FAO technology notes for rural youth programme workers and rural teachers

Volunteer Leadership Development

Case studies and guide on volunteer leadership development for rural youth programming

 

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