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Sustainable Development Goals

Means of Implementation

The need for significant mobilization of resources from a variety of sources and the effective use of financing is widely recognized as being critical to a truly transformative global development framework.

Means of implementation (MoI) describes the interdependent mix of financial resources, technology development and transfer, capacity‐building, inclusive and equitable globalization and trade, regional integration, as well as the creation of a national enabling environment required to implement the sustainable development agenda.

MoI and sustainable development financing were initially discussed by UN Member States in the context of the post-2015 development agenda in twin working groups mandated by the Outcome Document (The Future We Want) of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20): The Intergovernmental Open Working Group (OWG) of the UN General Assembly (UNGA) on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the Intergovernmental Committee of Experts on Sustainable Development Financing.

In the post-2015 outcome document, Transforming our world: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, MoI are included in targets under each of the first 16 goals and also as the final standalone goal where 19 targets are separated into sections on finance, technology, capacity building, trade and systemic issues. The report also devotes a dedicated section to Means of Implementation and the Global Partnership, where significant mention is made to the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, the outcome document of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development.

Intergovernmental negotiations

UN General Assembly resolution 68/279 emphasized “the need for effective coordination” between the preparatory process for the Third Financing for Development Conference and the preparations for the summit to be held in September 2015 for the adoption of the post-2015 development agenda, “in order to promote coherence and to minimize duplication of effort”.

Drawing on its expertise and experience as the leading UN specialized body committed to food security and sustainable development, FAO supported Member States with information and analysis on MoI relating to 14 key themes in sustainable development: Food Security and the Right to Food; Nutrition; Poverty Eradication; Resilience; Social Protection; Climate Change; Ecosystems, Biodiversity and Genetics; Energy; Fisheries, Aquaculture, Oceans and Seas; Forests and Mountains; Land and Soils; Sustainable Agriculture (crops and livestock); Tenure Rights; and Water.

Drawing on its expertise and experience as the leading UN specialized body committed to food security and sustainable development, FAO is supporting Member States with information and analysis on MoI relating to 14 key themes in sustainable development: Food Security and the Right to Food; Nutrition; Poverty Eradication; Resilience; Social Protection; Climate Change; Ecosystems, Biodiversity and Genetics; Energy; Fisheries, Aquaculture, Oceans and Seas; Forests and Mountains; Land and Soils; Sustainable Agriculture (crops and livestock); Tenure Rights; and Water.

Shaping up the UN system

A key question in the process is the role, capacity and readiness of the UN system to support countries implement the post-2015 development agenda. The post-2015 framework is expected to complement existing work on the MDGs and will ultimately become an important factor in determining UN System activities at all levels, with post-2015 targets informing UN Country Teams in the development of the next generation of UN Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF) or other UN programming frameworks.

In ongoing discussions, the UN System Chief Executives Board for Coordination (CEB) identified five driving elements of being “fit for purpose”: universality, integration, human rights, equality and data for development. Meanwhile, the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) has been holding a series of dialogues on the long-term positioning of the UN Development System. The first dialogue in December 2014 focused on the governance, evolution and priorities of the System.

Monitoring and review

The High-level Political Forum on sustainable development (HLPF), set up at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), will be the main platform for monitoring and review of the post-2015 development agenda. The HLPF meets every four years at the level of Heads of State and Government under the auspices of the UNGA, and every year under the auspices of ECOSOC.

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