Sistemas de investigación y extensión

Publicaciones

Type: Publicaciones
Year: 2005

This new publication aims to provide a preliminary response to the question: How can developing countries encourage the various systems, organizations and producers concerned with agricultural research, education and extension, and operating in the public or private sector, to behave as one system with regard to the agricultural development component of rural development? In other words: what do developing countries need to establish and maintain an Agricultural Knowledge and Information System (AKIS) that targets agriculture – broadly conceived as crops, livestock, fisheries and forestry – as a main component of rural development (RD)?

Type: Publicaciones
Year: 2005

This workshop was a follow-up to the study, Georgia: ICT Infrastructure and Use in Agriculture, Agricultural Policy, Research, and Education Organizations (T. Temel, A. Maru, 2003), commissioned by the Sustainable Development Group (REUS) of the FAO Regional Office for Europe (REU). Ten presentations and discussions on information and communication systems (ICS) in their respective organizations showed relative strength in technologies and databases at institutional levels, but weak connectivity to the local user levels.

Type: Publicaciones
Year: 2005

The rural people in developing countries are often far removed from many important decision-making processes. Production and consumption of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is a topical issue and could impact on socio-cultural systems of rural populations in developing countries. Involving the rural people in decision-making on GMOs was discussed during this moderated e-mail conference hosted by the FAO Biotechnology Forum in 2005.

Type: Publicaciones
Year: 2005

The geographical location of farmers is one of the factors under consideration when strategies for client-oriented agricultural extension approaches are being outlined. A large number of men and women are engaged in farming in thousands of small, medium and large islands, and they need extension advice according to their unique situation. FAO has conducted several studies to identify extension and training needs of farmers living in different geographical locations such as mountains, desert and small islands. This publication is based on a study that was conducted in the island country of Samoa, located in the Pacific Ocean.

Type: Publicaciones
Year: 2004

All walnut species of the genus Juglans are trees or large shrubs having shoots with chambered piths, large aromatic compound leaves, staminate catkins on one-year-old wood and female flowers on the top of the current year's twigs. The husked fruit is a false drupe containing a large woody-shelled nut. All Juglans produce edible nuts, although size and extrability differ considerably. Most species are highly regarded for their timber. The genus Juglans consists of approximately 20 species grouped taxonomically into four sections: Rhysocaryon, Cardiocaryon, and Trachycaryon, Dioscaryon.