La resiliencia
Recent global agreements give small-island and land-locked developing countries the backing they need to better prepare for disasters

Recent global agreements give small-island and land-locked developing countries the backing they need to better prepare for disasters

09/03/2016

A series of recent global agreements have left governments of small-island developing states (SIDS) and land-locked developing countries (LLDCs) better placed to implement risk reduction strategies to deal with climate change and natural disasters, an FAO convened meeting heard today.

While typhoons, floods, earthquakes and other disasters will continue to plague some of Asia-Pacific’s most vulnerable countries, a convergence of international instruments has emerged to help small-island and landlocked countries become more resilient to disasters.

The high-water mark of this convergence became evident last December with the Paris Agreement (COP21) to limit global average temperatures to below 2°C and another breakthrough a year earlier, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction to mitigate loss of life, livelihoods and health resulting from natural disasters. Both of these international commitments are underpinned by the world’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the 2030 Agenda – approved by the United Nations last September.

Eighteen small-island and landlocked countries are participating in a consultation to discuss the recent endorsements at a meeting in Putrajaya, Malaysia, convened by FAO and co-hosted with the Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI).

“This meeting couldn’t have come at a more important time,” said Dan Gustafson, FAO Deputy Director General, during opening remarks. “I strongly welcome the 2030 Agenda, in part, because I believe that it acknowledges the crucial role that resilience plays in achieving universal food security and, by extension, sustainable development.”

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