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Noto’s Satoyama and Satoumi

Noto Peninsula has a rich history and culture that dates back over 2100 years. Though life on the peninsula was initially typical of a hunting and gathering society, according to archeological surveys, the roots of today‘s agricultural system can be traced to the Nara Era over 1300 years ago.  Over the last millennia, human settlements on Noto peninsula have evolved, shaped by their natural environs. Today, indigenous animism, feudal era based hereditary resource use rights and practices, along with contemporary regulations and laws influenced by Western thought coexist and influence nature views, resource use rights and practices on the peninsula. Traditional customs based on indigenous Shinto and Buddhist traditions such as planting and harvesting festivals, culturally distinct festivals referred to as kiriko celebrating of the Gods protection of marine life and coastal peoples‘ livelihoods, Oku-noto Aenokoto an agricultural rice planting and harvest ritual unique to the Noto region which was inscribed on the UNESCO Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, among other nature-based traditional customs and festivals are a constant of community life throughout the peninsula.  The peninsula is a microcosm of traditional rural Japan where agricultural systems are integrally linked to mountains and forest activities upstream and coastal marine activities down stream. Holistic approaches to integrated human activities of fishing, farming and forestry have traditionally been practiced and continue to coexist. Hilly terrain interspersed with wide valleys and fields forming a green corridor surrounded by volcanic rock coastline typify the peninsular landscape. The peninsula is characterized by a mosaic of managed socio-ecological systems referred to as satoyama, terrestrial-aquatic landscape ecosystems comprised of secondary woodlands, plantations, grasslands, farmlands, pasture, irrigation ponds and canals, and satoumi, marine-coastal ecosystems comprised of seashore, rocky shore, tidal flats and seaweed/eelgrass beds1 .  The communities of Noto have joined to work together to sustainably maintain the satoyama and satoumi landscapes and the traditions that have sustained generations for centuries, aiming at building resilience to climate change impacts and to secure biodiversity on the peninsula for future generations. 

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Editor: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
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Organización: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
Otras organizaciones: Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)
Año: 2011
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País(es): Japan
Cobertura geográfica: Asia y el Pacífico
Tipo: Estudio de caso
Idioma utilizado para los contenidos: English
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