Font size:

Contact us:

Topic: Agricultural techniques

Moringa for increased nutrition and poverty reduction

by Ms. Tyson Deal

Familiar with Moringa?  I need your help! My name is Tyson Deal, and I am a graduate student at the University of Georgia pursuing a Master’s of Agricultural Leadership. I am conducting a study about Moringa and the limiting factors of its adoption and use for agricultural development.

I am looking for individuals to participate in a research study for my master’s thesis. The study involves answering questions regarding the subject of Moringa and agricultural development. If you would be interested to lend your expertise by participating in the study, if you have questions, or would like more information, please contact me or the primary investigator (PI) Maria Navarro at fsn-moderator@fao.org.

If you are interested in participating, the link to the questionnaire is: https://ugeorgia.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_6Xy1dFhvC4VrQcB. Please feel also free to answer the questions in this Forum.

Your time, participation, and input are greatly appreciated. I thank you in advance for helping a graduate student and contributing to research for the greater-good.

Tyson Deal and Dr. Maria Navarro

University of Georgia
United States of America

Fixing Uganda's Extension System

by Mr. Rwakakamba Morrison

Uganda has only 1600 extension workers mandated to serve 4,000, 000 million farmer households in Uganda giving a ratio of 1: 2500 farmer households.
The rural nature of most farms remains a challenge to graduate and fresh extension workers from college as these fresh professionals often prefer enjoying the trappings of peri-urban life.  
How do we crack this state of affairs? Do we leave solutions to policy makers and technocrats? Do we call for reinstatement and restoration of regional district farm demonstrations and stock farms?
A solution may perhaps lie in a stronger role of the private sector such as engaging in public –private partnerships and embracing technology. There is a pool of Extension Link farmers that were in late 1990’s trained by Uganda National Farmers Federation all over Uganda. Mobile phones technology can be used to complement extension efforts. Could such a model bring down the current expansive farmer-extension worker ratio and abridge the current information gap at the farm level?

How to improve fertility of sesame plots

by Robert Okello Omach

Hello members,

in Lamwo district of Northern Uganda, sesame is majorly grown in plots that were fallowed the previous year(s) as such plots have high organic matter content and thus high fertility. This practice however limits the elderly from participating in sesame production (yet it is among the major income generating crops) because farmers have to go far from homesteads (an average of about 6 Km) to access the fallowed or virgin plots. An elderly farmer asked me how they could improve the fertility of the plots around the homesteads so that they are able to use them for sesame production. I would love to get views and experiences from colleagues on this issue.

Regards,

Robert Okello Omach
Agricultural Development Officer
Mercy Corps Uganda.

Download resource

What do we really know about the number and distribution of farms and family farms in the world?

The agricultural economics literature provides various estimates of the number of farms and small  farms in the world. This paper is an effort to provide a more complete and up to date as well as  carefully documented estimate of the total number of farms in the world, as well as by region and  level of income.

It uses data from numerous rounds of the World Census of Agriculture, the only  dataset available which allows the user to gain a complete picture of the total number of farms  globally and at the country level. The paper provides estimates of the number of family farms, the  number of farms by size as well as the distribution of farmland by farm size.

These estimates find that:  there are at least 570 million farms worldwide, of which more than 500 million can be considered  family farms. Most of the world’s farms are very small, with more than 475 million farms being less  than 2 hectares in size. Although the vast majority of the world’s farms are smaller than 2 hectares,  they operate only a small share of the world’s farmland. Farmland distribution would seem quite  unequal at the global level, but it is less so in low- and lower-middle-income countries as well as in  some regional groups.

These estimates have serious limitations and the collection of more up-to-date  agricultural census data, including data on farmland distribution is essential to our having a more representative picture of the number of farms, the number of family farms and farm size as well as farmland distribution worldwide.