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Topic: Agricultural techniques

Fixing Uganda's Extension System

by Mr. Rwakakamba Morrison

Uganda has only 1600 extension workers mandated to serve 4,000, 000 million farmer households in Uganda giving a ratio of 1: 2500 farmer households.
The rural nature of most farms remains a challenge to graduate and fresh extension workers from college as these fresh professionals often prefer enjoying the trappings of peri-urban life.  
How do we crack this state of affairs? Do we leave solutions to policy makers and technocrats? Do we call for reinstatement and restoration of regional district farm demonstrations and stock farms?
A solution may perhaps lie in a stronger role of the private sector such as engaging in public –private partnerships and embracing technology. There is a pool of Extension Link farmers that were in late 1990’s trained by Uganda National Farmers Federation all over Uganda. Mobile phones technology can be used to complement extension efforts. Could such a model bring down the current expansive farmer-extension worker ratio and abridge the current information gap at the farm level?

How to improve fertility of sesame plots

by Robert Okello Omach

Hello members,

in Lamwo district of Northern Uganda, sesame is majorly grown in plots that were fallowed the previous year(s) as such plots have high organic matter content and thus high fertility. This practice however limits the elderly from participating in sesame production (yet it is among the major income generating crops) because farmers have to go far from homesteads (an average of about 6 Km) to access the fallowed or virgin plots. An elderly farmer asked me how they could improve the fertility of the plots around the homesteads so that they are able to use them for sesame production. I would love to get views and experiences from colleagues on this issue.

Regards,

Robert Okello Omach
Agricultural Development Officer
Mercy Corps Uganda.

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Healthy soils are the basis for healthy food production

The most widely recognized function of soil is its support for food production. It is the foundation for agriculture and the medium in which nearly all food-producing plants grow. In fact, it is estimated that 95% of our food is directly or indirectly produced on our soils. Healthy soils supply the essential nutrients, water, oxygen and root support that our food-producing plants need to grow and flourish. Soils also serve as a buffer to protect delicate plant roots from drastic fluctuations in temperature.

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Improving food safety and quality along the chain to protect public health, support fair food trade and contribute to food security and economic development

Ensuring food safety is a public health priority, and an essential step to achieving food security. Effective food safety and quality management systems are key not only to safeguarding the health and well-being of people but also to fostering economic development and improving livelihoods by promoting access to domestic, regional and international markets