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Reference Date: 09-April-2014

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  1. Drought affecting food security in the Northwest region

  2. More rains needed for planting of the 2014 main season cereal crop

  3. Cereal imports forecast to remain high in the 2013/14 marketing year (July/June)

  4. Rice and maize meal prices remain stable in March

Drought affecting food security in the Northwest region

Well below-average precipitation from November to March has resulted in crop losses of the 2013/14 “autumn” season, mainly sorghum, beans and maize, in high altitude areas and prevented farmers from planting in low-lying parts. Although the impact of the reduced output in the region in the 2013 national production is not significant, the Northwest region is one of the most vulnerable regions in the country, with 43 percent of household suffering from food insecurity and high rates of chronic malnutrition. In order to assist the drought-affected population, the Government of Haiti and the United Nations have launched a joint appeal for international support. The World Food Programme (WFP) has recently distributed 1 500 tonnes of food to approximately 164 000 people, mainly women and children. In addition, the Ministry of Agriculture also provided 6 000 seed kits. Additional emergency assistance is still needed, in particular with agricultural inputs for planting of the 2014 main season crop which has just started with improved precipitation in late March.

More rains needed for planting of the 2014 main season cereal crop

In the main producing regions of Artibonite and West, planting of the 2014 main “spring” season cereal crops, mainly maize, is well advanced. Remote sensing data indicate below-average precipitation in February and March, which delayed planting. More rain is needed to avoid significant reduction of yield potential this season.

Recovery in 2013 cereal output

The 2013 cereal production (main and second seasons) was estimated at 540 000 tonnes, or 35 percent up on the previous year’s sharply-reduced level. This mainly reflects a recovery in yields of maize, rice and sorghum due to favourable weather during the cropping season, in particular the absence of tropical storms and flooding.

Cereal imports forecast to remain high in the 2013/14 marketing year (July/June)

Despite the 2013 good cereal production, imports in the 2013/14 marketing year (July/June) are forecast at 706 000 tonnes, unchanged from the previous year’s level but 5 percent higher than the five-year average. The increase reflects greater wheat imports, which are forecast to reach their pre-earthquake levels of 197 000 tonnes. Imports of other cereals are expected to remain at average levels.

Rice and maize meal prices remain stable in March

The prices for imported rice, the main food staple, remained unchanged in most of the country and declined slightly in Port‑au‑Price, reflecting the weakening of U.S. rice export quotations for a second consecutive month. Prices of maize meal, the country’s second most important food staple, remained stable in most markets and were lower than a year earlier, reflecting adequate supplies from the good 2013 production.













Relevant links:
From GIEWS:
 Food Price Data and Analysis Tool
 Main Food-related Policy Measures (From 1 Jan 2008 to 11 Oct 2011)
 Crop and Food Security Assessment Mission (CFSAM) Reports & Special Alerts: 2010, 2005
From FAO:
 FAO Country Profiles

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