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Country Briefs

  Peru

Reference Date: 29-June-2017

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  1. Uncertain prospects for 2017 cereal production

  2. Cereal imports in 2017/18 marketing year anticipated at record level

  3. Cereal prices eased in May pressured by high import levels

Uncertain prospects for 2017 cereal production

Cereal production in Peru occurs on a continuous basis, with harvesting taking place across the country at different times in the calendar year. The bulk of the 2017 cereal harvest is currently ongoing and will conclude in August, prospects are currently favourable. By contrast, harvests which took place during the first quarter of the year were severely affected by flooding. Excess precipitations in the month of February caused significant damages to crops and reduced yields, particularly maize, in the main producing regions of Lambayeque, Piura and Ica. Official estimates point to a decline of some 8 percent in maize output during the January to March period, relative to the same time a year earlier. Although official estimates for the current harvest are not yet available, assuming yields will remain at last year’s level, FAO anticipates that cereal output for 2017 may decline by some 2 percent to almost 5 million tonnes, reflecting the impacts of the flooding.

Cereal imports in 2017/18 marketing year anticipated at record level

Cereal import requirements in the 2017/18 marketing year (January/December) are initially forecast at a record level of about 5.5 million tonnes. This forecast mainly reflects higher maize imports as a result of the decline in output during the first quarter of the year and high local demand. Wheat flour prices also remained stable.

Cereal prices eased in May pressured by high import levels

Prices of yellow maize eased in May and were lower than a year earlier, pressured by significant amounts of imports since the beginning of the year. Wheat flour prices remained unchanged in May and around or below their year-earlier values, mainly reflecting adequate imports. Rice prices eased in May with the beginning of the new harvest and imports, but were higher than a year earlier.

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